Donnie G

Donnie G

Lives in United States United States
Works as a Retired
Joined on Apr 15, 2012

Comments

Total: 460, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

nixda: As a scientist, I was immediately intrigued by this sensor and could think of a myriad of applications in various types of microscopy.

I find it annoying that many people here think, because they don't have a use for this type of device, nobody else would have a use either. And then there are even those who think that nobody else SHOULD have a use either. How narrow-minded and ignorant.

This website does attract more than its fair share of unmedicated paranoid schizophrenic trolls, but they are generally harmless. Just ignore them. There are some useful discussions that take place here as well. :))

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2015 at 19:04 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: It'll be fun to see what the creative minds in the motion picture industry produce with this camera. It'll be even more fun watching the Canon bashers beat their keyboards to a bloody pulp as the ME20F-SH goes about the business of generating new revenue for Canon and does its part to help propel EF lens production toward a 120 million milestone. Now that's mirrorless done right, lol. :))

Very true dash. This camera will simplify a lot of nighttime color video production work by reducing or even eliminating the need for TV and other broadcast crews to carry and setup complex lighting equipment in order to mimic capturing a night scene. They will be able to capture those color shots easily in real time. The savings in production man hours alone is worth a heck of a lot more than a paltry $30,000 to the folks in that business. :))

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2015 at 18:08 UTC

It'll be fun to see what the creative minds in the motion picture industry produce with this camera. It'll be even more fun watching the Canon bashers beat their keyboards to a bloody pulp as the ME20F-SH goes about the business of generating new revenue for Canon and does its part to help propel EF lens production toward a 120 million milestone. Now that's mirrorless done right, lol. :))

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2015 at 15:01 UTC as 23rd comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

Donnie G: The ME20F-SH is a good example of how Canon plays to its strengths by creating entirely new imaging tools that present real solutions to longstanding problems encountered by imaging industry professionals instead of simply imitating what's being done by others. This camera is the only product available that addresses a longstanding need, (30 years or more), in the broadcast and surveillance industries for high quality color video capture in total darkness. At $30,000 a pop, you and I won't be buying one, but Canon will sell boatloads of these cameras to those who need them. Also, expect to see that new locking EF cinema mount on all future Cinema EOS camera bodies. Good job Canon!

Ah Francis, we understand. Truly we do. :))

Direct link | Posted on Jul 30, 2015 at 23:42 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: The ME20F-SH is a good example of how Canon plays to its strengths by creating entirely new imaging tools that present real solutions to longstanding problems encountered by imaging industry professionals instead of simply imitating what's being done by others. This camera is the only product available that addresses a longstanding need, (30 years or more), in the broadcast and surveillance industries for high quality color video capture in total darkness. At $30,000 a pop, you and I won't be buying one, but Canon will sell boatloads of these cameras to those who need them. Also, expect to see that new locking EF cinema mount on all future Cinema EOS camera bodies. Good job Canon!

Well Eleson, while all of the camera makers have been fighting for a piece of an ever shrinking consumer camera market, Canon has proven to be one of the few camera companies that has successfully moved into new growth revenue streams like cinema photography and now surveillance. So while Canon still owns the lion's share of the consumer camera market, they are smart enough to expand into other markets that their competitors can't even dream of entering into. It's called diversification, and as the new ME20F-SH will prove in the near future, Canon is very good at diversifying. Do I admire the company for their business sense? Absolutely!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 30, 2015 at 23:28 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: The ME20F-SH is a good example of how Canon plays to its strengths by creating entirely new imaging tools that present real solutions to longstanding problems encountered by imaging industry professionals instead of simply imitating what's being done by others. This camera is the only product available that addresses a longstanding need, (30 years or more), in the broadcast and surveillance industries for high quality color video capture in total darkness. At $30,000 a pop, you and I won't be buying one, but Canon will sell boatloads of these cameras to those who need them. Also, expect to see that new locking EF cinema mount on all future Cinema EOS camera bodies. Good job Canon!

I suspect that the color images will look a like more natural to the human eye than what we see with night vision goggles and infrared capture. Very useful for identification purposes. Think homeland security and CCTV without the need for lights that give away the camera's location. Absolutely huge market potential for this new camera. Huge!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 30, 2015 at 20:47 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: The ME20F-SH is a good example of how Canon plays to its strengths by creating entirely new imaging tools that present real solutions to longstanding problems encountered by imaging industry professionals instead of simply imitating what's being done by others. This camera is the only product available that addresses a longstanding need, (30 years or more), in the broadcast and surveillance industries for high quality color video capture in total darkness. At $30,000 a pop, you and I won't be buying one, but Canon will sell boatloads of these cameras to those who need them. Also, expect to see that new locking EF cinema mount on all future Cinema EOS camera bodies. Good job Canon!

Well Francis, I guess you've never watched a National Geographic or BBC documentary on the habits of nocturnal creatures. Also, think military, law enforcement, scientific research, and a whole bunch of other commercial uses for this camera. Just because you can't use the camera doesn't mean that the camera doesn't have any valid uses. Of course, if all you're really interested in is Canon bashing, then go right ahead. We understand.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 30, 2015 at 20:01 UTC

The ME20F-SH is a good example of how Canon plays to its strengths by creating entirely new imaging tools that present real solutions to longstanding problems encountered by imaging industry professionals instead of simply imitating what's being done by others. This camera is the only product available that addresses a longstanding need, (30 years or more), in the broadcast and surveillance industries for high quality color video capture in total darkness. At $30,000 a pop, you and I won't be buying one, but Canon will sell boatloads of these cameras to those who need them. Also, expect to see that new locking EF cinema mount on all future Cinema EOS camera bodies. Good job Canon!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 30, 2015 at 17:08 UTC as 50th comment | 17 replies
On Alpha dog: Hands-on with Sony a7R II article (1067 comments in total)

In terms of specs, the a7R II appears to be the first full frame body from Sony to seriously challenge Nikon's 800 series and Canon's 5D series cameras. If the a7R II works as well as its specs suggest it can, then Sony has hit a home run that pros will take seriously, and the legacy FF SLT bodies can finally be laid to rest at last. Good job Sony!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2015 at 12:47 UTC as 131st comment | 1 reply
On Interview: Canon's Chuck Westfall on the new XC10 article (347 comments in total)
In reply to:

Donnie G: Someone commented here that the Canon XC10 is a prosumer PowerShot camera, and I agree. The camera is everything that a PowerShot built for pros on a budget should be. I won't try to comment on its image quality or even on whether it will be accepted by the target user base until I can get my hands on one and check it out for myself. What impresses me the most at this time are the design and ergonomics. I think Canon has made a very user friendly camera that, like all PowerShots, can be picked up and used by anyone regardless of their skill level. If all of this proves to be true in practice, then I will definitely buy one for myself by next spring. It would be the first small sensor camera that I would consider to be a compliment to my DSLR system and the way I work. As first impressions go, I really like what I see in the XC10. :))

Exactly, TheDevil, I just prefer to use the term video camera instead of camcorder, but you are correct. Maybe you could pass that info on to T3 and his Canon bashing buddies (doubt if it would do any good). It seems to me that being able to operate all of the controls from the grip while using the viewfinder is a very intuitive design feature that would work well for stills shooting, (the sensor is large enough), as well as video capture. For that reason, I think that stills photographers, newly entering into the world of broadcast quality video capture, would become very comfortable, using the XC10, very quickly, thus reducing the learning curve involved in mastering high level video capture techniques. Additionally, the fixed lens and its aperture range covers most of what a majority of working photographers and videographers are called upon to do on a daily basis. If they need more, then they need to step up to a Cinema EOS camera. :))

Direct link | Posted on Apr 30, 2015 at 17:34 UTC
On Interview: Canon's Chuck Westfall on the new XC10 article (347 comments in total)
In reply to:

Donnie G: Someone commented here that the Canon XC10 is a prosumer PowerShot camera, and I agree. The camera is everything that a PowerShot built for pros on a budget should be. I won't try to comment on its image quality or even on whether it will be accepted by the target user base until I can get my hands on one and check it out for myself. What impresses me the most at this time are the design and ergonomics. I think Canon has made a very user friendly camera that, like all PowerShots, can be picked up and used by anyone regardless of their skill level. If all of this proves to be true in practice, then I will definitely buy one for myself by next spring. It would be the first small sensor camera that I would consider to be a compliment to my DSLR system and the way I work. As first impressions go, I really like what I see in the XC10. :))

Love your rants, T3, because they do occasionally contain a nugget of truth, even if only by accident. Example, it is absolutely true that I tend to be loyal to those manufacturers who have never produced a product that has let me down, like Jeep, Apple, and yes, Canon. It's also true that I prefer to shop top drawer, but I'm not opposed to picking up a bargain when it meets my needs. But enough about me. What do you do with your time and how do you spend your money when you're not busily trashing all things Canon? Still living with your parents or what? Oh, and once again, thanks for your support. :))

Direct link | Posted on Apr 28, 2015 at 14:55 UTC
On Interview: Canon's Chuck Westfall on the new XC10 article (347 comments in total)
In reply to:

Donnie G: Someone commented here that the Canon XC10 is a prosumer PowerShot camera, and I agree. The camera is everything that a PowerShot built for pros on a budget should be. I won't try to comment on its image quality or even on whether it will be accepted by the target user base until I can get my hands on one and check it out for myself. What impresses me the most at this time are the design and ergonomics. I think Canon has made a very user friendly camera that, like all PowerShots, can be picked up and used by anyone regardless of their skill level. If all of this proves to be true in practice, then I will definitely buy one for myself by next spring. It would be the first small sensor camera that I would consider to be a compliment to my DSLR system and the way I work. As first impressions go, I really like what I see in the XC10. :))

If smartphone video clips define the upper limits of your need for, and, understanding of video production, T3, then I can see why a device like the XC10 wouldn't make sense to you. However, my work demands that I strive for higher ground when producing video, for myself or for my customers, and if the XC10 proves to be the camera that can help me achieve my goals, then yes, I will buy one, or maybe even two. Meanwhile, when between jobs, as long as I can entertain myself by catching swarms of testy trolls in my net, then I can have fun and relax too. And the fishing is always good in these waters. Thank you for your support! :))

Direct link | Posted on Apr 28, 2015 at 13:12 UTC
On Interview: Canon's Chuck Westfall on the new XC10 article (347 comments in total)
In reply to:

Donnie G: Someone commented here that the Canon XC10 is a prosumer PowerShot camera, and I agree. The camera is everything that a PowerShot built for pros on a budget should be. I won't try to comment on its image quality or even on whether it will be accepted by the target user base until I can get my hands on one and check it out for myself. What impresses me the most at this time are the design and ergonomics. I think Canon has made a very user friendly camera that, like all PowerShots, can be picked up and used by anyone regardless of their skill level. If all of this proves to be true in practice, then I will definitely buy one for myself by next spring. It would be the first small sensor camera that I would consider to be a compliment to my DSLR system and the way I work. As first impressions go, I really like what I see in the XC10. :))

Fixed lens pro video cameras routinely cost $2500 and more, and the XC10 is a video camera first and foremost. What sets it apart from other single chip video cameras, like the GH4, is that it is built around video ergonomics instead of a stills camera SLR design. Canon's approach to this video camera design appears to be equally well suited to being used by stills photographers who are new to video capture, but find themselves being forced to learn it in order to stay competitive in todays multimedia hungry marketplace. If, like me, you are trying to transition from stills capture to pro level video capture, then a camera, like this XC10, that comes complete with everything you need to get started for a mere $2500, is cheap compared to the cost of any cinema camera or even the GH4 once you add up the cost of lenses and other accessories that you will have to buy for the GH4 before you can use it. Of course, if you don't do pro grade video then none of this matters to you. :))

Direct link | Posted on Apr 27, 2015 at 13:13 UTC
On Interview: Canon's Chuck Westfall on the new XC10 article (347 comments in total)
In reply to:

Donnie G: Someone commented here that the Canon XC10 is a prosumer PowerShot camera, and I agree. The camera is everything that a PowerShot built for pros on a budget should be. I won't try to comment on its image quality or even on whether it will be accepted by the target user base until I can get my hands on one and check it out for myself. What impresses me the most at this time are the design and ergonomics. I think Canon has made a very user friendly camera that, like all PowerShots, can be picked up and used by anyone regardless of their skill level. If all of this proves to be true in practice, then I will definitely buy one for myself by next spring. It would be the first small sensor camera that I would consider to be a compliment to my DSLR system and the way I work. As first impressions go, I really like what I see in the XC10. :))

Well T3, you're at least right about one thing, Canon does count on people who think. Is the camera worth its asking price? Nobody will know the answer to that one until they become available to buy. Just because you may not be able to afford the camera is no reason to knock it. Chances are you aren't one of the folks that this camera was designed for in the first place. The camera is expensive because it's designed to withstand heavy pro use and therefore must be as reliable as a 5DIII or 1DX. The absence of interchangeable lenses and RAW capture aren't deal breakers for me. Whether they prove to be deal breakers for other targeted users will be made crystal clear in the marketplace when these cameras become available for sale. Now, do I think this type of camera is a good idea? Yes I do, but as in all things, time will tell who's right and who's wrong, so save your venom until after the Christmas buying season when you might actually have some facts to backup your rant with. :))

Direct link | Posted on Apr 26, 2015 at 23:21 UTC
On Interview: Canon's Chuck Westfall on the new XC10 article (347 comments in total)

Someone commented here that the Canon XC10 is a prosumer PowerShot camera, and I agree. The camera is everything that a PowerShot built for pros on a budget should be. I won't try to comment on its image quality or even on whether it will be accepted by the target user base until I can get my hands on one and check it out for myself. What impresses me the most at this time are the design and ergonomics. I think Canon has made a very user friendly camera that, like all PowerShots, can be picked up and used by anyone regardless of their skill level. If all of this proves to be true in practice, then I will definitely buy one for myself by next spring. It would be the first small sensor camera that I would consider to be a compliment to my DSLR system and the way I work. As first impressions go, I really like what I see in the XC10. :))

Direct link | Posted on Apr 26, 2015 at 20:48 UTC as 26th comment | 17 replies
On Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal article (813 comments in total)

Canon creates another tool for working pros that, once again, sends armchair hobbyists stomping about madly and foaming at the mouth with rage and resentment because the product wasn't designed for them and isn't priced for them either. Boohoo! How dare Canon put pros before trolls! Let's teach Canon a lesson by running out right now and buying all the A7s, A6000s, FZ1000s, and GH4s we can find, then put our Canon lenses on them. I bet that'll show Canon who's boss. :))

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 20:24 UTC as 69th comment | 7 replies
On Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal article (813 comments in total)
In reply to:

Donnie G: It's wonderful to see the trolls whipped up into a feeding frenzy over Canon's XC10 multi-media camera, especially since, on this site, that usually means that Canon has hit another grand slam home run out of the marketplace ballpark. Canon's fresh approach to camera design ergonomics, distilled from their Cinema EOS cameras, is a very clear indication of the form any mirrorless EOS DSLR replacement will take in the future. Imagine a mirrorless EOS Rebel with no need of a battery draining EVF and no need for a mirror box to support an OVF because it would have a simple removable eye loupe that attaches directly to the live view display. You would control the sensor display from the grip via a joystick when the loupe is attached. Ah, but first things first. :))

It'll be great to see what real world users actually think of the camera. As in all things, time will tell. Won't it be fun to see the sales figures at the end of the year? I think so. :))

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 02:12 UTC
On Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal article (813 comments in total)

It's wonderful to see the trolls whipped up into a feeding frenzy over Canon's XC10 multi-media camera, especially since, on this site, that usually means that Canon has hit another grand slam home run out of the marketplace ballpark. Canon's fresh approach to camera design ergonomics, distilled from their Cinema EOS cameras, is a very clear indication of the form any mirrorless EOS DSLR replacement will take in the future. Imagine a mirrorless EOS Rebel with no need of a battery draining EVF and no need for a mirror box to support an OVF because it would have a simple removable eye loupe that attaches directly to the live view display. You would control the sensor display from the grip via a joystick when the loupe is attached. Ah, but first things first. :))

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 01:04 UTC as 176th comment | 9 replies
On Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal article (813 comments in total)
In reply to:

munro harrap: I have just read Canon's stuff on this on their own website. UK price is £1600, so it is only 2.something times more expensive than an FZ1000, but they are advertizing it as an aspiring filmaker and enthusiasts camera. IT is worth downloading the spec sheets, but as well as limited IS in 4K mode there is none in slow or fast modes either anywhere and the battery life typically is around 75 minutes, people.
I cannot see anything about recording levels or external recording level monitoring, but it does have an external mic and a headphone socket.
Very expensive considering you get just a loupe instead of an optical or even EVF viewfinder. I cannot imagine using it for stills, and cannot imagine how noisy it might be in poor light with an f5.6 lens on a 1" sensor, can you?

It will be interesting to see if any of the pros who will actually buy and use the XC10 on a daily basis will share any of your imagined concerns about a camera you have never touched or used. But hey, I get it, trolls need love too. :))

Direct link | Posted on Apr 8, 2015 at 23:50 UTC
On Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal article (813 comments in total)

What makes the Canon XC10 better or more brilliant than the GH4, A7s, NX1, etc.? Well, instead of building a "me too" version of those other cameras, Canon chose to create the 1st. affordable, purpose built, multi-media device for today's up and coming multi-media professionals. Traditional enthusiasts are not the target audience, although many of the ergonomic and other design elements, such as the clip on viewfinder, will surely find their way into products designed for enthusiasts in the near future. Meanwhile, Canon will sell millions of these new multi-media cameras to those who do see the brilliance and bang for the buck in its design. Great job Canon! Great article DPR! :))

Direct link | Posted on Apr 8, 2015 at 22:17 UTC as 195th comment | 13 replies
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