Samuel Dilworth

Samuel Dilworth

Lives in France Paris, France
Joined on Feb 20, 2011

Comments

Total: 622, showing: 1 – 20
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On Samsung NX1 firmware v1.2 now available article (36 comments in total)
In reply to:

Randy Veeman: One of the new features is the ability to download more FW updates over the camera's WiFi. This tells me Samsung is not done yet and more goodies are on the way.
Thank you Samsung!

Now we’re talking. Trust an outsider to implement this obvious and frankly necessary feature while the old guard continues to act like it hates its customers. If Nikon and Canon do get their comeuppance, no-one will be able to deny they deserved it. Which is a great shame.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 24, 2015 at 21:44 UTC
On Hands-on with Nikon's new D5500 article (268 comments in total)
In reply to:

Samuel Dilworth: Amazing: just after adding a GPS receiver to this class of cameras (in the D5300) Nikon now removes it. What is going on?

Surely geotagging is worth more than the next three dozen gizmos no-one asked for? Taking photos of our lives is no longer the problem; organising and using those photos is the problem, and for that we need better metadata. Geotags and time-stamps are a good start. To me, GPS is far more valuable than Wi-Fi.

Otherwise, this camera shows off several interesting new design ideas. Small steps but probably important ones, since SLRs increasingly look and feel low quality compared to mirrorless cameras.

Yes, I’ve used a Dawn Technology di-GPS (similar to the Nikon GP-1 which came later) for years. For a long time Nikon had the best support for external GPS receivers, which is why it so surprises me to see the lack of progress on this front (and regression in the D5500).

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 18:24 UTC
On Hands-on with Nikon's new D5500 article (268 comments in total)
In reply to:

Samuel Dilworth: Amazing: just after adding a GPS receiver to this class of cameras (in the D5300) Nikon now removes it. What is going on?

Surely geotagging is worth more than the next three dozen gizmos no-one asked for? Taking photos of our lives is no longer the problem; organising and using those photos is the problem, and for that we need better metadata. Geotags and time-stamps are a good start. To me, GPS is far more valuable than Wi-Fi.

Otherwise, this camera shows off several interesting new design ideas. Small steps but probably important ones, since SLRs increasingly look and feel low quality compared to mirrorless cameras.

I’m under 40 but can’t remember where I took most of my photos.

Battery power is a complete non-issue for me. Most camera owners own one battery (the one that came with the camera) and seldom run out of power. Who takes 500 photos a day on a regular basis? Not me, that’s for sure. There are days I take a dozen.

Besides, as I said, GPS receivers use negligible power these days. If the camera can’t power the GPS receiver without powering other sub-systems then that’s just the manufacturer being cheap and lazy. I’m calling for an end to that precise laziness, which is endemic in the camera industry.

It’s funny, I could do without literally 90 % of the features on today’s cameras, many of which barely work or are otherwise useless. In fact, I’d strongly prefer cameras to have fewer features. But a GPS receiver is the one thing I want, and hardly anyone does it. Talk about frustrating!

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 17:07 UTC
On Hands-on with Nikon's new D5500 article (268 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ben O Connor: They could make a body or hand grip (like Panasonic did for gh4, not necessarily bulky as the video grip) , which would suit 5100,5200,5300. And even maybe suitable for 3100,3200,3300 series, and built it many in numbers, would drop the costs and selling better etc etc.

Instead they made a whole new camera (or did they?) which has GPS (that others can track you!) and Wi-Fi (which would not work for my window phone anyway!).

End of the day; there is D810! Why would I spend a single cent for anything else from Nikon! (forgot to mentioned D4s, D750 are also cool stuff.. But man! That ovf and shutter voice... And off camera jpegs ! Amazing!)

The D5500 doesn’t have GPS.

(And although GSM and GPS both start with ‘G’, they aren’t further related.)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 14:36 UTC
On Hands-on with Nikon's new D5500 article (268 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ben O Connor: They could make a body or hand grip (like Panasonic did for gh4, not necessarily bulky as the video grip) , which would suit 5100,5200,5300. And even maybe suitable for 3100,3200,3300 series, and built it many in numbers, would drop the costs and selling better etc etc.

Instead they made a whole new camera (or did they?) which has GPS (that others can track you!) and Wi-Fi (which would not work for my window phone anyway!).

End of the day; there is D810! Why would I spend a single cent for anything else from Nikon! (forgot to mentioned D4s, D750 are also cool stuff.. But man! That ovf and shutter voice... And off camera jpegs ! Amazing!)

Sadly, no-one can track you with this D5500. Check the specs.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 13:22 UTC
On Hands-on with Nikon's new D5500 article (268 comments in total)
In reply to:

Samuel Dilworth: Amazing: just after adding a GPS receiver to this class of cameras (in the D5300) Nikon now removes it. What is going on?

Surely geotagging is worth more than the next three dozen gizmos no-one asked for? Taking photos of our lives is no longer the problem; organising and using those photos is the problem, and for that we need better metadata. Geotags and time-stamps are a good start. To me, GPS is far more valuable than Wi-Fi.

Otherwise, this camera shows off several interesting new design ideas. Small steps but probably important ones, since SLRs increasingly look and feel low quality compared to mirrorless cameras.

GPS receivers need very little power these days (on the order of 10–100 mW).

Besides, geotagging is one of the most useful applications of battery power. I won’t remember where I took half of last week’s photos next week, much less in the year 2025. Maybe it’s different for people who only photograph in places they know well.

It’s also fun and useful to see on a map exactly where you stood when you took a photo. With the help of an almanac (or suitable smartphone app) you can then plan a return trip knowing exactly where the sun will be when you get there.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 12:21 UTC
On Hands-on with Nikon's new D5500 article (268 comments in total)

Amazing: just after adding a GPS receiver to this class of cameras (in the D5300) Nikon now removes it. What is going on?

Surely geotagging is worth more than the next three dozen gizmos no-one asked for? Taking photos of our lives is no longer the problem; organising and using those photos is the problem, and for that we need better metadata. Geotags and time-stamps are a good start. To me, GPS is far more valuable than Wi-Fi.

Otherwise, this camera shows off several interesting new design ideas. Small steps but probably important ones, since SLRs increasingly look and feel low quality compared to mirrorless cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 08:55 UTC as 56th comment | 10 replies
On Canon announces five PowerShot compacts article (150 comments in total)
In reply to:

WT21: I don't care at all about these, but it caught my eye that the ELPH160 and 170 are using CCD sensors?? What is that getting Canon? I'd almost think they were old sensors lying around, but at 20MP, they sound like new development. Of course, the limitation is immediately evident with movie mode of only 720 (maybe it's an avi file type?) Is there much upside to using CCD this day and age?

Sony wants to keep the old CCD fabs running as long as possible, so offers these as a low-end option at an unbeatable price?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 5, 2015 at 16:53 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1833 comments in total)

The very enthusiastic reception for this camera surprises me.

To me it seems like just another fractional iteration of Nikon’s FX platform, largely put together from existing or tweaked technology modules. It does little or nothing to solve the big problems causing SLR sales to fall. (It doesn’t even have a built-in GPS receiver for geotagging.) Unless I’m missing something, it has nothing that might attract a new type of customer either. Even the design is a nondescript, black blob indistinguishable from any other Nikon SLR to a causal observer. It practically defines banality.

What is there to get excited about? The main innovation seems to be a novel, cost-cutting construction technique – not that you’d notice as a buyer, since a D750 sells for $800 more than the functionally similar D610 (itself overpriced).

Obviously it’s not for me, but I can appreciate many cameras that aren’t. This one defeats me. Maybe my expectations are out of whack.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 30, 2014 at 14:35 UTC as 183rd comment | 11 replies
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 First Impressions Review preview (302 comments in total)
In reply to:

Merel: It's amazing that most of top rated camera's (of course at higher price) do not include GPS. Almost everybody shoots extremely high amount of pictures during vacations, at locations often far away from home.

Eventually we all end up with those unavoidable questions
" Darling where was this picture taken ? And this one ? Where was that again? "

So why is this GPS feature so neglected ? The DMC-GM5 (and others) would have been so much nicer camera in my list ! For that price, most people would expect GPS to be a standard feature or at least an option. Everybody might have it's own reasons, but on the subject I guess anybody will agree.

When showing your best pictures, what is the most common question you will get to answer ? .... " Waaow ! WHERE was this ? "

The conversation above shows it doesn’t have to be like that, Eric. Camera makers have just been cheap and lazy and (in some cases, they made cameras before better GPS receivers were available).

But even if it took two minutes to get a fix, that would still be useful for some photographers in some situations – me, for example.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 24, 2014 at 08:55 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 First Impressions Review preview (302 comments in total)
In reply to:

Merel: It's amazing that most of top rated camera's (of course at higher price) do not include GPS. Almost everybody shoots extremely high amount of pictures during vacations, at locations often far away from home.

Eventually we all end up with those unavoidable questions
" Darling where was this picture taken ? And this one ? Where was that again? "

So why is this GPS feature so neglected ? The DMC-GM5 (and others) would have been so much nicer camera in my list ! For that price, most people would expect GPS to be a standard feature or at least an option. Everybody might have it's own reasons, but on the subject I guess anybody will agree.

When showing your best pictures, what is the most common question you will get to answer ? .... " Waaow ! WHERE was this ? "

The Garmin GPSMAP 60CSx uses a SiRFstarIII GPS receiver, which for many years was the gold standard. It’s a 20-channel receiver, so it can download data from all visible satellites simultaneously, greatly shortening time to first fix (hence your 45 seconds).

I tried my Garmin nüvi on a TGV once (at 300-odd km/h). It took literally half an hour to get a fix but did eventually do it. Obviously I wouldn’t want to rely on it achieving that.

My phone’s receiver, like yours, is dramatically quicker and more sensitive. It also taps into the Russian GLONASS satellite system – how much that helps I don’t know.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2014 at 20:27 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II Review preview (1233 comments in total)
In reply to:

Zerg2905: Dear DPREVIEW...
I read your reviews carefully. Because I think you have the skills, and the expertise, to produce quite good reviews. And many, many times, I was on the same page with you, especially when you pointed (rightly) the clear flaws some of the Canon cameras have. But not this time. I own the 7D 2. I had the 7D before, and between these two there is no contest. Sony sensors, ah, yes, they DO have more DR (but not that much). Other brands DO have more video mumbo jumbo (and big minuses in other areas). But the 7D 2 is, in my opinion, a photo tool, first hand. So tell me, please: which photo tool in the APS-C world is matching the 7D 2? The SLT A-77 II? I would have to disagree, as I have use it, too. Other brands don't have anything close, but, like the 7100, are "Gold award" cameras.
I think the Silver Award is a BIG MISTAKE (and many EU and US articles seem to be on my side here...), a mistake that will cost you credibility. Not now, but in the mid-long term. If it matters.

Flaws may be overstating it, but videographers had to work around many inconveniences – hence the rise to prominence of companies like Zacuto. And for stills, it lacked the speed and autofocus sophistication of its Nikon D700 rival.

But that 21-megapixel sensor derived from the eight-grand 1Ds Mark III made it all worthwhile for a lot of photographers, many of whom still rely on their 5D Mark II daily.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2014 at 09:48 UTC
In reply to:

iAPX: I still don't understand how someone could spend so much into a camera and then use a non-calibrated iPhone display on it. Non-sense!

As DStudio says, iPhones are calibrated and profiled quite well when they leave the factory – likely better than anything made by a camera manufacturer!

Besides, precise colour accuracy doesn’t really matter on a camera display (and is anyway impossible to achieve in bright and varied ambient light).

Direct link | Posted on Dec 17, 2014 at 16:31 UTC
In reply to:

Angrymagpie: So beautiful, so far away.

[Mistaken post removed. But you’re right – so wistful!]

Direct link | Posted on Dec 17, 2014 at 16:29 UTC
On Pocket Watch in the Macro - Machine challenge (5 comments in total)

Mechanical timepieces are among the most astonishing, beautiful, and of course influential of human achievements. The idea that the oscillation of a balance wheel like the one in this photo could be regulated to a few parts per million by minute weights and temperature-compensating bimetallic construction is to me laughably audacious – and yet John Harrison’s marvellous chronometers achieved that already in the 18th century.

If you are mechanically minded, learning how these watches function will give you enormous pleasure.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 17, 2014 at 15:14 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply

ALPA cameras are uncommonly beautiful and well-made things. It’s worth visiting the ALPA stand at your next camera show just to check them out, though be sure to wear your best tie!

By the way, the 35 mm lens is variously described as f/4 and f/5.6 above. I think it’s the former.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 17, 2014 at 12:27 UTC as 36th comment
On Have your say: Best Lens of 2014 article (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

smafdy: Pentax SMC-FA 77mm f/1.8 Limited

I agree with all of that, Mescalamba.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 15, 2014 at 22:38 UTC
On Have your say: Best Consumer ILC of 2014 article (27 comments in total)
In reply to:

WillWeaverRVA: EDIT: Never mind. The acronym "ILC" is confusing, though, as it's typically taken to mean "interchangeable lens compact" (i.e. a mirrorless camera) and not what it's supposed to mean here: "interchangeable lens camera".

The term ‘mirrorless’ is understood by everyone and rather apt. Like the horseless carriage (now car) and wireless set (now radio), it will disappear when the time is right.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 15, 2014 at 22:36 UTC
On Have your say: Best Consumer ILC of 2014 article (27 comments in total)

I have a feeling the horrible little α6000 is going to take this.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 15, 2014 at 21:32 UTC as 13th comment | 5 replies
On Have your say: Best Lens of 2014 article (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

smafdy: Pentax SMC-FA 77mm f/1.8 Limited

A fine lens from 1999.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 15, 2014 at 20:01 UTC
Total: 622, showing: 1 – 20
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