Samuel Dilworth

Samuel Dilworth

Lives in France Paris, France
Joined on Feb 20, 2011

Comments

Total: 711, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Henry McA: A problem is the weird focal length of 21 - 30 mm on APSC. That´s not very useful, 16 - 35mm is useful, 15 - 24 would be useful but this is just a odd - why not use primes instead.

One reason is that such primes essentially don’t exist. There is even a dearth of f/2.8 primes in that angle-of-view range, much less f/2 models.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 2, 2016 at 09:31 UTC
On article Inching forward? Canon PowerShot G5 X review posted (386 comments in total)
In reply to:

TFD: I fail to see the point of an $800 camera that you cannot slip into your pocket. If I want an $800 camera that does not slip into my pocket I will buy a DLSR.

I think IvanM’s question is also asked by others. Why does this camera, like every Canon compact for many years, but unlike every cheap SLR (including Canon’s) for at least a decade, have such poor shot-to-shot times?

It seems to fly in the face of Moore’s law and all the rest. Is it done deliberately to encourage SLR sales? Perhaps DPReview should badger Canon until they give a plausible answer.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 15, 2015 at 14:52 UTC
On article Inching forward? Canon PowerShot G5 X review posted (386 comments in total)
In reply to:

Samuel Dilworth: What is the shot-to-shot time in raw? I hope I didn’t miss this somewhere in the review.

To me, the shot-to-shot time is much more important than the continuous frames per second.

Thanks.

Thanks, Jeff. That is not nearly quick enough for me. I wonder why Canon has barely improved this key factor in responsiveness in so many years.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 15, 2015 at 08:22 UTC
On article Inching forward? Canon PowerShot G5 X review posted (386 comments in total)

What is the shot-to-shot time in raw? I hope I didn’t miss this somewhere in the review.

To me, the shot-to-shot time is much more important than the continuous frames per second.

Thanks.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 14, 2015 at 20:51 UTC as 98th comment | 2 replies
On article Readers' Showcase: Rob Kearney (76 comments in total)
In reply to:

sop51: Just look at Andreas Gursky's "Rhein II" or Cindy Sherman's "Untitled #96." Someone actually paid $4.3 million for Gursky's print recently, breaking Sherman's record of $3.9 million for the most overpriced photographic print ever sold. Can anyone honestly say those prints are any better than Kearney's work? I gave up trying to figure out what "great photography" is a long time ago.

This is a better insight into Gursky, albeit from 13 years ago: https://vimeo.com/17692722

Direct link | Posted on Dec 14, 2015 at 08:59 UTC
On article Readers' Showcase: Rob Kearney (76 comments in total)
In reply to:

showmeyourpics: Let's keep some perspective. The young man shows promise. His pics show his efforts to "see" the picture. The processing leaves a lot to be desired. He definitely deserves encouragement and I wish him not to grow a gigantic ego

Read the text when you get a moment.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 13, 2015 at 19:54 UTC
In reply to:

Cihangir Gzey: Ball bearings used to avoid zoom creeping in long term usage and bigger screws are used for reliable long term operation. These items don't even needed to be mentioned considering the price of the end product. BUT, we are all so fed up to see disposable products which give away soul during warranty or just after warranty (car, camera, TV, phone, etc.), we get amazed when we see a product which has been put into shape properly. We need to see similar level of engineering quality from their cheaper lenses as well. After all, the main cost of these units are GLASS!
When you guess the labor cost of a glass element (which you don't see any here apart from the front element), these bearings, gaskets, injection moulded plastic parts mean nothing! :) Well done anyway.

Well said.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 13:07 UTC

Like the Egyptian pyramids, this one is built to far outlive its usefulness (which risks being terribly short, given the current seismic shifts in the camera industry).

Still, I applaud well-built things.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 12:31 UTC as 42nd comment | 7 replies
On Connect post Apple launches battery case for iPhone 6 & 6s (147 comments in total)
In reply to:

Samuel Dilworth: The Apple site says it is compatible with both the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6s. If I had to guess whether DPReview or Apple got this wrong, I’d have to bet on DPReview. But what about a confirmation all the same?

There is no satisfactory way to design an add-on battery. This way is at least honest and probably ergonomic (making the phone easier to pick up from a flat surface among other things). I prefer it to the usual technique of faking a new back, which goes against all principles of good design.

Still, it is design by designers for designers. Surprisingly, the iPhone itself has sold well despite its similar take on design, but I am not so sure the sort of person who wants an add-on battery pack is the sort of person who likes highfalutin industrial design.

Swoopy curves do not make something ergonomic, whether that thing is a pen, a camera, or a keyboard. That Fiskars used curves ergonomically in a pair of scissors does not prove that curves are always ergonomic or that ergonomic product design must revolve around conforming to the surfaces of an imagined body shape. The last fifty years are littered with examples of this faux style of ergonomics.

I have never typed as quickly (over 100 words/minute) as I do on my Mac’s flat keyboard with short-travel keys. And you can pry my Magic Mouse from my cold, dead fingers: it finally put an end to years of repetitive strain symptoms inflicted by Microsoft, Dell, and Logitech mice, likely of the shape your IT guys smugly handed out to replace the puck mice (which I agree were dreadful).

Many Apple products are not just ergonomic but highly so. From time to time they make a dud.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 00:57 UTC

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, Leica should be blushing.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 9, 2015 at 17:29 UTC as 21st comment | 1 reply
On Connect post Apple launches battery case for iPhone 6 & 6s (147 comments in total)

The Apple site says it is compatible with both the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6s. If I had to guess whether DPReview or Apple got this wrong, I’d have to bet on DPReview. But what about a confirmation all the same?

There is no satisfactory way to design an add-on battery. This way is at least honest and probably ergonomic (making the phone easier to pick up from a flat surface among other things). I prefer it to the usual technique of faking a new back, which goes against all principles of good design.

Still, it is design by designers for designers. Surprisingly, the iPhone itself has sold well despite its similar take on design, but I am not so sure the sort of person who wants an add-on battery pack is the sort of person who likes highfalutin industrial design.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 9, 2015 at 11:47 UTC as 28th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Franz Weber: Here is a nice read from 2010:

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/4562533607/samsungmirrorless

"Samsung wants to own camera market"

Samsung never wanted for hubris.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2015 at 09:02 UTC
On article Sony Europe introduces a68 SLT with 79-point AF module (305 comments in total)

How does Sony reconcile the plastic horror of this thing with its view of what the ‘Sony’ brand means? Japanese companies are such a mystery to me.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2015 at 20:47 UTC as 71st comment

Earth is a hard place to live if you have a modicum of taste.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 2, 2015 at 10:51 UTC as 29th comment | 11 replies

In Europe, the defective cameras never got sold. Sales have just started here – I know because I have had a pre-order for a month and finally got mine a few days ago.

Seems to have been worth the wait, by the way! A nice camera at a sensible price.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 29, 2015 at 10:07 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Markol: No 4k,no gps, no viewfinder.... What sets the g9x apart from the original RX100?
Wifi. To me, this seems very little for such a long time since the first 1" compact.

My three-year-old iPhone 5’s Assisted GPS “doesn’t suck”.

When I get out of the Métro it takes 5–10 seconds to nail my precise position. Every time. Surrounded by buildings. I suppose newer phones are even better.

If Assisted GPS is required to make GPS workable in cameras then cameras should have it. It’s that simple. The sort of network connection that Kindles have would do the job.

My own experience is that Assisted GPS is not needed. I am happy to wait slightly longer for a fix at the start of a session and then run the receiver for the rest of the day.

There are problems about what to do when you lose signal, such as when walking into a cathedral. Established GPS companies like DawnTech (I’ve used a di-GPS for years) have solved these problems after a fashion. Clever people could solve them in better ways.

No-one’s trying because they’re witless. Sorry to be blunt.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 14, 2015 at 11:38 UTC
In reply to:

Archiver: About seven years ago, I would have been salivating at the prospect of a new Canon compact camera. I own the S45, S70, G7, G10, and S90. My credit card would have been ready for Canon's latest camera. It's a little sad that either my interests have moved past a once-favourite brand, or that they no longer produce cameras that suit me as well as they once did.

I have seen variations on this theme in several places. But what is sad about being freed at last from a consumerist addiction?

I think the G9 X is genuinely interesting. Fitting a 1"-type sensor and zoom lens with appropriate coverage in such a small package is impressive. It makes the RX100 cameras look big!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 14, 2015 at 10:33 UTC
In reply to:

Markol: No 4k,no gps, no viewfinder.... What sets the g9x apart from the original RX100?
Wifi. To me, this seems very little for such a long time since the first 1" compact.

This anti-GPS attitude is peculiar. What would it matter to you if I got my wish and cameras had workable geotagging?

The numbers above suggest the battery charge would fall by 2.4% after 12 hours of continuously running the GPS receiver. That leaves 97.6% for running the camera before charging overnight.

Larger cameras have larger batteries and would be even less affected by running the GPS.

There is no such product because many people – customers, reviewers, camera makers – don’t have the wit to know why it would be useful.

I think they’ll eventually get there. But I’m surprised first Nikon and then Canon implemented basic geotagging only to abandon it in favour of phone-linked geotagging – which almost no-one uses, the disadvantages being too severe.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 14, 2015 at 06:31 UTC
In reply to:

mxx: Camera nomenclature these days baffles me. One of the 3 new Canons is labeled as mirrorless, so one would then think the other two have mirrors... But no.

‘Mirrorless’ is short for mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera. The mirrorless bit refers to the lack of a reflex mirror.

It is common to call these cameras mirrorless. It is not common to call compact cameras like the LX100 mirrorless even though it’s literally true.

In a similar way, ‘wireless’ once meant a home radio receiver (in the UK, at least). A horseless carriage was a car. Etc.

Language evolves and mirrorless will eventually be a quaint term, like wireless for radio or horseless carriage for car. But for now, it’s the accepted parlance and the best term for the breed.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 13, 2015 at 14:50 UTC
In reply to:

Richard Murdey: And these are better than the RX100 series how exactly?

They are a lot thinner and cheaper. These things are very important even though you’d never guess it from camera reviews.

Of all the camera companies, Canon still best understands the value of removing features.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 13, 2015 at 12:32 UTC
Total: 711, showing: 1 – 20
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