Samuel Dilworth

Samuel Dilworth

Lives in France Paris, France
Joined on Feb 20, 2011

Comments

Total: 634, showing: 1 – 20
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On Phase One's Capture One Pro 8.2 software now available article (68 comments in total)
In reply to:

SmilerGrogan: Wow, the Three-Way Color Corrector comes to still photos. I just started using it in Resolve and Premiere and it's quite different from the way Photoshop and the rest do color correction...It's like the difference between skiing and snowboarding. Or maybe snow skiing and water skiing. DPR should do an article on how to use it.

Well, something similar has been in Aperture for years, as I noted below. But I agree – would be useful to have a DPReview article on using it.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 25, 2015 at 18:54 UTC
On Phase One's Capture One Pro 8.2 software now available article (68 comments in total)
In reply to:

OBI656: CaptureOne is a great application for pro photographers however to install CaptureOne and specifically do an upgrade it is absolute pain.

I have NOT seen application in history of Mac computer being so terribly difficult to install and upgrade.

Why they are doing this so difficult for end user is beyond to comprehend.

It’s not drop and click (or even drag and drop). It’s an unintuitive process of mounting disk images and making sure you’re not running an app from the disk image. This is an archaic way to install software and should have been abolished years ago (and it has been abolished by most software developers). You have to be modestly computer savvy to do it right – trust me, I’ve spent a lot of time sorting out problems caused by people not understanding this seemingly simple process.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 25, 2015 at 14:18 UTC
On Phase One's Capture One Pro 8.2 software now available article (68 comments in total)

This new Color Balance Tool will be very useful if it works well (and why shouldn’t it?)

You can do colour grading of this sort with multiple RGB curves, but you have to know what you’re doing and it’s still cumbersome. Curves are more precise than colour wheels, but often that precision is unneeded.

I had success using the Tint colour wheels in Aperture for grading, even though they were really designed for removing colour casts in mixed lighting – in fact, those colour wheels were a key reason I chose Aperture over Lightroom, lo those many years ago.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 24, 2015 at 23:46 UTC as 12th comment
In reply to:

matthias jurisch: € 3000.00 for this lens...no thanks...I`ll gladly stick with my Tokina 11-16mm 2.8...for about € 550.00...

They both go to 11, right?

Direct link | Posted on Mar 19, 2015 at 13:39 UTC
On Elinchrom announces new ELB 400 portable flash system article (23 comments in total)
In reply to:

tex: Why are these, and others, so no knock on Elinchrom per se, so doggone expensive? Considering what cameras are and can do today, and what they cost, I don't get it.

Many reasons, no doubt, but the big one is the very small market for such gear.

Then there’s the fact they’re designed and marketed by an old European company that thinks about things like backward compatibility, upgrades for old customers (such as the lightweight li-ion battery replacement for the original gel-electrolyte battery), and spare parts ten years down the line.

The light quality from these heads is impressive, too. Rich, beautiful, full-spectrum light. For some reason, colours look noticeably better under these heads than under my SB-26 and SB-700 Speedlights (I’m not talking about differences in modifiers).

But yes, they are very expensive, and when Chinese companies learn more about design and marketing there will be no room left for these prices. Or will the Chinese companies have greatly raised their prices by that point? Hard to say.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2015 at 10:44 UTC
On Elinchrom announces new ELB 400 portable flash system article (23 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sergio Rojkes: Not much different from the already fantastic ranger quadra.
Im glad to see that elinchrom preserves the clients keeping the heads compatible.
Kudos

Agreed. I have an earlier Ranger Quadra, and it’s nice to know I can use newer battery tech and new heads with my old pack. Renaming the A and S heads to Action and Pro also helps clarify their purpose (though Pro is still ambiguous).

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2015 at 10:35 UTC
On Kowa announces pricing for three Micro Four Thirds lens article (148 comments in total)
In reply to:

MarkInSF: Looks good in black. Not so sure about green. Not that it isn't a nice, tasteful green, but still...

Kowa has used that green for many decades. It practically identifies Kowa products.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 10:00 UTC
On Kowa announces pricing for three Micro Four Thirds lens article (148 comments in total)
In reply to:

RichRMA: I don't know. Olympus makes a high-end 12mm f/2.0 with AF and much smaller and cheaper than the Kowa so apart from some kind of video application, why buy the Kowa?

The appeal of very large Micro Four Thirds lenses is definitely limited.

But in other regards these lenses are attractive to a certain kind of photographer, one who works slowly and methodically and has an appreciation of fine mechanical things. These are all-metal lenses, unlike anything by Olympus or Samyang. They’ll last a hundred years unless you drop them.

For tripod-mounted photography, I much prefer to work with all-metal, manual-focus lenses. It’s just easier to get consistently good results.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 09:59 UTC
On Kowa announces pricing for three Micro Four Thirds lens article (148 comments in total)
In reply to:

Hubertus Bigend: Why the heck do I have to click through eleven pages of images and (however short) text until I finally know what that "pricing" actually is?! This publishing style is a nuisance for the reader, especially on smaller screens. Ever heard the word 'usability' in the context of web publishing?

It’s a usability plus in that it tricks people with notoriously short attention spans into reading multiple paragraphs – something they might not do unless the text was presented in easily digestible chunks.

And the high number of clicks and seeming engagement look good to advertisers.

On the other hand, it is frustrating for anyone genuinely interested in the content – like me, in this case. And it trivialises the content, making it seem like empty filler rather than something Damien worked hard to make. Paradoxically, this impression actively encourages readers to adopt the click-happy, skim-reading browsing style that these techniques were designed to combat in the first place.

In short, when good websites like DPReview adopt these practices, it makes the world a (very slightly) worse place. Web designers would do well to remember the golden rule: treat others as you would like others to treat you.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 09:51 UTC
On Kowa announces pricing for three Micro Four Thirds lens article (148 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Well, it's nice to see Kowa getting back into more "consumer" lenses again. The green branding is distinctive without being too odd. Good luck to them.

The green colour is indeed distinctive. It’s also Kowa’s traditional colour. I disagree with Damien that it doesn’t make sense without a green camera.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 09:48 UTC
On Nikon D7200 First Impressions Review preview (827 comments in total)
In reply to:

Horshack: Welcome to iteration city, population you.

Can anyone point me to the nearest exit?

Direct link | Posted on Mar 2, 2015 at 10:08 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 Review preview (437 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dave Oddie: <grammar alert>

Little, Improved

That is ambiguous grammar.

Is that supposed to mean the camera has hardly been improved over the previous version (as in little improvement) or is a small camera that has had improvements made to it?

"Small, improved" is less ambiguous if you are going to adopt a spartan headline and use a comma instead of a "but" or an "and".

</grammar alert>

The comma is there. Any ambiguity is playful and engaging. It’s the kind of thing that makes writing (and reading) fun!

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 11:42 UTC
On Samsung NX1 firmware v1.2 now available article (43 comments in total)
In reply to:

Randy Veeman: One of the new features is the ability to download more FW updates over the camera's WiFi. This tells me Samsung is not done yet and more goodies are on the way.
Thank you Samsung!

Now we’re talking. Trust an outsider to implement this obvious and frankly necessary feature while the old guard continues to act like it hates its customers. If Nikon and Canon do get their comeuppance, no-one will be able to deny they deserved it. Which is a great shame.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 24, 2015 at 21:44 UTC
On Hands-on with Nikon's new D5500 article (286 comments in total)
In reply to:

Samuel Dilworth: Amazing: just after adding a GPS receiver to this class of cameras (in the D5300) Nikon now removes it. What is going on?

Surely geotagging is worth more than the next three dozen gizmos no-one asked for? Taking photos of our lives is no longer the problem; organising and using those photos is the problem, and for that we need better metadata. Geotags and time-stamps are a good start. To me, GPS is far more valuable than Wi-Fi.

Otherwise, this camera shows off several interesting new design ideas. Small steps but probably important ones, since SLRs increasingly look and feel low quality compared to mirrorless cameras.

Yes, I’ve used a Dawn Technology di-GPS (similar to the Nikon GP-1 which came later) for years. For a long time Nikon had the best support for external GPS receivers, which is why it so surprises me to see the lack of progress on this front (and regression in the D5500).

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 18:24 UTC
On Hands-on with Nikon's new D5500 article (286 comments in total)
In reply to:

Samuel Dilworth: Amazing: just after adding a GPS receiver to this class of cameras (in the D5300) Nikon now removes it. What is going on?

Surely geotagging is worth more than the next three dozen gizmos no-one asked for? Taking photos of our lives is no longer the problem; organising and using those photos is the problem, and for that we need better metadata. Geotags and time-stamps are a good start. To me, GPS is far more valuable than Wi-Fi.

Otherwise, this camera shows off several interesting new design ideas. Small steps but probably important ones, since SLRs increasingly look and feel low quality compared to mirrorless cameras.

I’m under 40 but can’t remember where I took most of my photos.

Battery power is a complete non-issue for me. Most camera owners own one battery (the one that came with the camera) and seldom run out of power. Who takes 500 photos a day on a regular basis? Not me, that’s for sure. There are days I take a dozen.

Besides, as I said, GPS receivers use negligible power these days. If the camera can’t power the GPS receiver without powering other sub-systems then that’s just the manufacturer being cheap and lazy. I’m calling for an end to that precise laziness, which is endemic in the camera industry.

It’s funny, I could do without literally 90 % of the features on today’s cameras, many of which barely work or are otherwise useless. In fact, I’d strongly prefer cameras to have fewer features. But a GPS receiver is the one thing I want, and hardly anyone does it. Talk about frustrating!

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 17:07 UTC
On Hands-on with Nikon's new D5500 article (286 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ben O Connor: They could make a body or hand grip (like Panasonic did for gh4, not necessarily bulky as the video grip) , which would suit 5100,5200,5300. And even maybe suitable for 3100,3200,3300 series, and built it many in numbers, would drop the costs and selling better etc etc.

Instead they made a whole new camera (or did they?) which has GPS (that others can track you!) and Wi-Fi (which would not work for my window phone anyway!).

End of the day; there is D810! Why would I spend a single cent for anything else from Nikon! (forgot to mentioned D4s, D750 are also cool stuff.. But man! That ovf and shutter voice... And off camera jpegs ! Amazing!)

The D5500 doesn’t have GPS.

(And although GSM and GPS both start with ‘G’, they aren’t further related.)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 14:36 UTC
On Hands-on with Nikon's new D5500 article (286 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ben O Connor: They could make a body or hand grip (like Panasonic did for gh4, not necessarily bulky as the video grip) , which would suit 5100,5200,5300. And even maybe suitable for 3100,3200,3300 series, and built it many in numbers, would drop the costs and selling better etc etc.

Instead they made a whole new camera (or did they?) which has GPS (that others can track you!) and Wi-Fi (which would not work for my window phone anyway!).

End of the day; there is D810! Why would I spend a single cent for anything else from Nikon! (forgot to mentioned D4s, D750 are also cool stuff.. But man! That ovf and shutter voice... And off camera jpegs ! Amazing!)

Sadly, no-one can track you with this D5500. Check the specs.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 13:22 UTC
On Hands-on with Nikon's new D5500 article (286 comments in total)
In reply to:

Samuel Dilworth: Amazing: just after adding a GPS receiver to this class of cameras (in the D5300) Nikon now removes it. What is going on?

Surely geotagging is worth more than the next three dozen gizmos no-one asked for? Taking photos of our lives is no longer the problem; organising and using those photos is the problem, and for that we need better metadata. Geotags and time-stamps are a good start. To me, GPS is far more valuable than Wi-Fi.

Otherwise, this camera shows off several interesting new design ideas. Small steps but probably important ones, since SLRs increasingly look and feel low quality compared to mirrorless cameras.

GPS receivers need very little power these days (on the order of 10–100 mW).

Besides, geotagging is one of the most useful applications of battery power. I won’t remember where I took half of last week’s photos next week, much less in the year 2025. Maybe it’s different for people who only photograph in places they know well.

It’s also fun and useful to see on a map exactly where you stood when you took a photo. With the help of an almanac (or suitable smartphone app) you can then plan a return trip knowing exactly where the sun will be when you get there.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 12:21 UTC
On Hands-on with Nikon's new D5500 article (286 comments in total)

Amazing: just after adding a GPS receiver to this class of cameras (in the D5300) Nikon now removes it. What is going on?

Surely geotagging is worth more than the next three dozen gizmos no-one asked for? Taking photos of our lives is no longer the problem; organising and using those photos is the problem, and for that we need better metadata. Geotags and time-stamps are a good start. To me, GPS is far more valuable than Wi-Fi.

Otherwise, this camera shows off several interesting new design ideas. Small steps but probably important ones, since SLRs increasingly look and feel low quality compared to mirrorless cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 08:55 UTC as 64th comment | 10 replies
On Canon announces five PowerShot compacts article (150 comments in total)
In reply to:

WT21: I don't care at all about these, but it caught my eye that the ELPH160 and 170 are using CCD sensors?? What is that getting Canon? I'd almost think they were old sensors lying around, but at 20MP, they sound like new development. Of course, the limitation is immediately evident with movie mode of only 720 (maybe it's an avi file type?) Is there much upside to using CCD this day and age?

Sony wants to keep the old CCD fabs running as long as possible, so offers these as a low-end option at an unbeatable price?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 5, 2015 at 16:53 UTC
Total: 634, showing: 1 – 20
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