Guidenet

Guidenet

Lives in United States Orlando, US, FL, United States
Works as a Retired Corporate Photographer
Has a website at http://faithartsvillage.com/
Joined on Sep 27, 2007
About me:

I'm a 63 year old retired corporate photographer who has also been a software engineer. My academia is largely based on Vision and my dissertation was on Fluids. I have a small studio and gallery which I enjoy on occasion. My specialty is bird photography, and I've been lucky to have had a few attempts published over the years. For the past twenty years, I worked for a large Fortune 500 company as their in-house photographer for the communications, publicity and care departments. I’ve also done their corporate meetings and events. As the company owns several television stations, making the opportunities endless.
I had to retire because I suffered a massive right side stroke in the spring of 2013. My small portrait studio and gallery are doing better than ever.
I have a daughter who is a successful Wedding Photographer. As I’ve embraced retirement, I've taken more and more shooting contracts, but only those I enjoy like the local little league baseball teams. I occasionally act as a cruise photographer for some of the cruise lines here in Florida when requested by organizations.
I also spend more and more time teaching basic photography for several resources locally as well as out of my studio located at FAVO (Faith-based Art Village of Orlando). As well as Photography, I am also a Water Color and Acrylic painter and enjoy recreating some of my favorite work in those mediums. Learning how to create art is a lifelong passion.
I'm seriously passionate about people learning exposure and the Zone System of Photography before considering themselves sufficiently astute in this craft. I’ve held several Zone System Workshops over the years as well as one Cruise based workshop. I’m also passionate about Ansel Adams’ ideas about pre-visualization. Pressing the shutter button and the camera are just one small part of the image creation process.
I started at eight years old in 1959 when my dad and I built a darkroom, him more than me. My father taught me the Zone System at a very young age. I continued as a youthful photographer, buying glass with lawn mowing money through my high school and then into college with odd jobs. I paid most of my tuition as an undergraduate shooting weddings and baby pictures as well as for the university newspaper. Many of those years I shot 4x5, 5x7 and 8x10 field cameras and sheet film. In small format, I shot Pentax until 1968 when I switched to Nikon, needing a better more professional system tool. I still shoot Nikon today as well as Nikkor lenses for some of my large format gear. I also mostly shoot digital but still maintain a darkroom for up to 5x7 format. 8x10 is stored in the attic and is only black and white. I even have a Nikkor enlarging lens. Over the years, I believe Nikon has been instrumental in the creation of truly great glass.

Comments

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I've always considered the big four of Arca Swiss, Really Right Stuff, Kirk and Markins to be the largest part of the Arca dovetail market with Aratech in there at a slightly lower price point. Quite honestly, I've never heard of the rest of them in both tests.

Personally, I'd not consider Gitzo because it's not Arca compatible. Gitzo is part of the Manfrotto group which is also not represented in either the 2014 or this review.

If we consider ballheads which are not Arca compatible, then we're certainly missing Manfrotto which probably has a market share larger than all these put together. Their top models are superb. I'm a little surprised at their omission. The Hydrostatic and magnesium models seem technologically interesting enough as well as being as unique as many that are represented but unheard of. ;-)

Maybe this is a list of ballheads owned by staff members and therefore readily available for review. Nothing wrong with that.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 8, 2015 at 06:51 UTC as 15th comment | 12 replies
On Sony Alpha a7 II Review preview (809 comments in total)
In reply to:

RubberDials: The review reads like it was written by a Nikon D750 owner and manages to skilfully bury almost all that's good about the A7ii under faint praise and exaggerated weaknesses.

What's funny is no one considering buying the A7ii is going to buy a D750 instead. A7ii buyers are trying to get away from cameras like that.

And if you want to compare them properly the D750 doesn't come off that well at all. Not surprising considering the A7ii is a higher-specced camera. It has a faster shutter, faster flash sync, twice raw buffer size, higher video bit-rate, focus peaking and IBIS as well as all the advantages of a mirrorless.

And where the D750 outperforms the A7ii at high ISO you fail to mention the contribution of the IBIS which you found conferred '2-3.3 stops of 'hand-hold-ability', so any high-ISO advantage is essentially eliminated.

Also the D750 can't shoot any wider than f1.2 either whereas the Sony has a range below f1. It can even shoot the rangefinder only Nikon 35mm f0.95. :)

And that's the times I sometimes use LV, on a tripod for macro and landscape, but I don't think it matters a bit about the DSLR verses Mirrorless experience in those two situations. You're on a tripod and generally have time to get it the way you want it. With landscapes, I've generally taken an incident reading with a light meter and with macro, I'm often using a strobe or two.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 7, 2015 at 00:58 UTC
On Sony Alpha a7 II Review preview (809 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike Sandman: Sony, if you're listening out there... fix the RAW compression issue via a firmware update and I'll place my order the next day.

I think the review is on target with its complaint. They say you're a "stone's throw" from being fully equal to a FF DSLR. You'll be a hair's breadth away with lossless RAW, or perhaps an option to save as an (uncompressed) DNG.

I'm with you. My Canon friends were quite angry as my 4/3rd friends were when Olympus dumped that mount for m4/3rds. Many of my m4/3rd friends aren't happy with Olympus still using an old 16 mp sensor either, but that's another story. Sony has jumped around with mounts and OIS verses IBIS for a while too. I'm not trusting these companies to be consistent with their systems. Nikon and Pentax are the only ones who've stayed rather true to their owner base, as far as I'm concerned and thus would be the only two I'd invest in long term.

I own Nikon glass I bought used in the 1960s with the money I made from mowing lawns. I still use some of these lenses today in a professional portrait and product studio. It's not just a hobby where I think six or seven years is a commitment to a lens mount or system.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 6, 2015 at 15:26 UTC
On Sony Alpha a7 II Review preview (809 comments in total)
In reply to:

RubberDials: The review reads like it was written by a Nikon D750 owner and manages to skilfully bury almost all that's good about the A7ii under faint praise and exaggerated weaknesses.

What's funny is no one considering buying the A7ii is going to buy a D750 instead. A7ii buyers are trying to get away from cameras like that.

And if you want to compare them properly the D750 doesn't come off that well at all. Not surprising considering the A7ii is a higher-specced camera. It has a faster shutter, faster flash sync, twice raw buffer size, higher video bit-rate, focus peaking and IBIS as well as all the advantages of a mirrorless.

And where the D750 outperforms the A7ii at high ISO you fail to mention the contribution of the IBIS which you found conferred '2-3.3 stops of 'hand-hold-ability', so any high-ISO advantage is essentially eliminated.

Also the D750 can't shoot any wider than f1.2 either whereas the Sony has a range below f1. It can even shoot the rangefinder only Nikon 35mm f0.95. :)

@nandbytes I've used Liveview on Sony cameras, Olympus cameras, as well as various compacts and bridge cameras. I've composed on the ground glass of various medium format cameras as well, which is a somewhat better experience, though not preferable, most of the time. I don't think Liveview is a particularly stable way to hold a camera. I also think the sun tends to wash out the view.

Moreover, I think the 6 or 8 bit tiny VGA LCD monitors of both the back panel and EVF tend not to show the image the sensor is capable of when the sensor is in capture mode. Along with added gain, the camera includes a rendition which includes sharpening and contrast based on JPeg settings meant for a full image, not that I shoot Jpeg. I think it lulls novice photographers into thinking what they see is what they can expect in the final image. It doesn't help that the marketing departments have promoted this idea.

It has nothing to do with my DSLR experience with Liveview.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 6, 2015 at 14:28 UTC
On Sony Alpha a7 II Review preview (809 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike Sandman: Sony, if you're listening out there... fix the RAW compression issue via a firmware update and I'll place my order the next day.

I think the review is on target with its complaint. They say you're a "stone's throw" from being fully equal to a FF DSLR. You'll be a hair's breadth away with lossless RAW, or perhaps an option to save as an (uncompressed) DNG.

@bluevellet I seem to remember not many years ago the 4/3rd consortium with their flagship E3 camera body and various lenses. Now a forgotten tombstone to remark its passing. Remember "telecentric" lenses? These 4/3rd consortium manufacturers were going to "own" the market. They were going to be the demise of compact and other DSLR cameras. Remember? You don't have to go back very far.

Step back a couple of generations to the OM line of fine Olympus cameras. What happened to that mount? Another stranded bunch of photographers, that's what. They were touted as tiny cameras which were going to own the market and be the demise of full sized DSLRs. Where have all the OMs gone, long time passing... (singing).

Step again back to that lovely line of Olympus Pen half frame cameras which were going to end the need for bulky SLRs. History now.

We have a long line of Olympus abandoning lens formats and mounts, stranding their fans. Adapters anyone?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 6, 2015 at 09:52 UTC
On Sony Alpha a7 II Review preview (809 comments in total)
In reply to:

RubberDials: The review reads like it was written by a Nikon D750 owner and manages to skilfully bury almost all that's good about the A7ii under faint praise and exaggerated weaknesses.

What's funny is no one considering buying the A7ii is going to buy a D750 instead. A7ii buyers are trying to get away from cameras like that.

And if you want to compare them properly the D750 doesn't come off that well at all. Not surprising considering the A7ii is a higher-specced camera. It has a faster shutter, faster flash sync, twice raw buffer size, higher video bit-rate, focus peaking and IBIS as well as all the advantages of a mirrorless.

And where the D750 outperforms the A7ii at high ISO you fail to mention the contribution of the IBIS which you found conferred '2-3.3 stops of 'hand-hold-ability', so any high-ISO advantage is essentially eliminated.

Also the D750 can't shoot any wider than f1.2 either whereas the Sony has a range below f1. It can even shoot the rangefinder only Nikon 35mm f0.95. :)

I agree. There's a lot of people who take the camera brand they've chosen as a religion rather than a tool. Moreover, liveview performance in anything much over a point and shoot is pretty much of a non-issue, and I'm not fond of it on a point and shoot, for that matter.

I know it sounds elitist, but watching these tourists at Disney holding their DSLRs out at arm's length is a bit humorous at best. They take forever attempting to see something on their sun-washed screens only to capture Facebook images to bore their friends.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 6, 2015 at 09:36 UTC
On Sony Alpha a7 II Review preview (809 comments in total)
In reply to:

QuantumPhysics: Can I post twice? I neglected to mention that all the lenses identified in my comment are without image stabilization. But for digital work with the A7 II they are now stabilized on three axes--you just dial in the focal length. The Canon 16-35mm f/2.8L is a zoom, but using the metabones adapter, focal length is communicated to the body.

The point I am making here is quite important. Low light performance is improved by three or four stops by image stabilization, compared to Canon and Nikon, so you can work at lower ISO levels in the first place. I think the images are just sumptuous using lenses I never thought suitable for digital cameras.
(Have you checked the price on a sub-645 Hasselblad digital back lately?)

All well and good, but the review pointed at more of a 2-3 stop improvement. Moreover, a tripod or good hand holding technique often trumps any form of electronic stabilization which can often degrade the images in many ways. The less jiggling around the optics or sensor the better.

Think about this. At shutter speeds over flash sync the shutter is never fully open. It's a slit running over the sensor. One curtain is closing while the other has started moving. At what point to you jiggle the sensor or optics? Does the level and type of stabilization stay constant while that slit is moving, exposing the sensor? This might be part of the reason tripod taken images just seem so darn sharp in comparison. It might also be why many professional sports and others like me leave stabilization defaulted to Off unless absolutely needed for a particular shot.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 6, 2015 at 09:11 UTC
On Sony Alpha a7 II Review preview (809 comments in total)
In reply to:

Calvin Palmer: I think the weight of any review must be put into the context of who is doing the review. Do the reviewers have an award-winning international reputation? Are they respected within the field of photography? I think the fact that both reviewers work for DPReview answers both questions. What we have here is simply an opinion that is as flawed as they reckon the A7II is. I found it, at times, patronizing, irrational and not quite as objective as they seem to think it is.

For the record, I do not own any Sony cameras. I do have a tenuous link in that I shot with a Minolta XD-7 for more than 25 years. I was probably taking photographs before the parents of the reviewers had even met.

However, I may become the owner of a Sony A7 II tomorrow. I am in the position to choose any FF camera but I simply do not want to have to carry the weight of a Canon or Nikon DSLR. And what attracts me most of all to the A7 II is the chance to shoot with the Otus Lite -- the Zeiss FE 55mm f/1.8 lens.

@ttrans I also could care less about liveview the vast percentage of the time. Most novice photographers I've met graduate from holding the camera out in front to eye-level finders in short order. Even back in the film days, Hasselblad owners often couldn't wait to mount their eye-level prism finder over the ground glass. Using a back LCD or ground glass for framing has been around a long time, and most of us find it an inferior way to hold a camera most of the time. Live View is nothing particularly new.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 6, 2015 at 08:58 UTC
On Sony Alpha a7 II Review preview (809 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike Sandman: Sony, if you're listening out there... fix the RAW compression issue via a firmware update and I'll place my order the next day.

I think the review is on target with its complaint. They say you're a "stone's throw" from being fully equal to a FF DSLR. You'll be a hair's breadth away with lossless RAW, or perhaps an option to save as an (uncompressed) DNG.

@Roman Korcek Why would you expect unusable photographs to be displayed in the internet? I don't believe anyone wants compressed lossy RAW files. That's the point of a RAW capture, to have the camera do as little as possible to the data. Sony's RAW implementation is poor on this model, and they need to fix it, obviously.

@Naveed Akhtar We're discussing a full frame camera, not m43 which I think is becoming less and less relevant anyway. Even my Canon G1x point and shoot has a larger sensor. It might be time for Olympus to obsolete another mount and move on up in sensor size. Over the years, Olympus fans have gotten used to the company abandoning a mount often enough.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 6, 2015 at 08:36 UTC
On Nikon D5500 Review preview (342 comments in total)
In reply to:

koolbreez: From looking at the comparisons with the D5300, the only useful thing upgraded is the battery life. They both use the same sensor, and processing engine, so no difference in image quality. They both have the same resolutions, although the high end is listed now as regular instead of extended, which actually means no difference. Buffers are the same, shutter speads are the same. The GPS has been removed, and can't be considered an upgrade, even if people didn't use it. So how can this review state that the D5500 is an upgrade in every respect, when only one useful item has been upgraded? A better grip? There never was a problem with the old grip contributing to shaky images...lolol. This simply looks like a review to sell cameras, not print the real truth. As more time passes DPReview gets less and less reliable.

I totally understand the disagreement with DPR's wording is what seems to be driving this conversation, but that's just semantics and marketing speak. No big deal. My point is if you upgrade features above what defines the D5xxx line, you get a D7xxx camera, and we have that available.

Within the specs of a D5xxx camera, things have been upgraded nicely, in my opinion. To me, those are the important features which appeal to photographers over camera owners. Moving to a tough but 14.9 oz body is a big deal, in my eyes. An extra stop in ISO and a touch screen might be big in other's views. An overhaul in the processing engine might be considered a pretty big thing as well, yet all this keeping the feature set aligned with the D5xxx specification. So, within that specification, one might consider the D5500 a pretty solid upgrade. It's just an opinion and viewpoint, not something to get riled up about. That's all.

Happy Easter to those who celebrate it. :-)

Direct link | Posted on Apr 6, 2015 at 00:29 UTC
On Nikon D5500 Review preview (342 comments in total)
In reply to:

dfsaqwe: I recently sold an EM1 kit looking to downgrade to something more midrange (life+priority changes, etc). Was hoping to look back into a Nikon but I'm just thoroughly unimpressed. The technology seems almost a generation or two behind what I left behind on m43.

Also being spoiled by 5 axis sensor IS ...

@Tord Sounds like you have a nice setup. I shoot almost exclusively Nikon FX but am looking really hard at a Nikon 1 V3 or a D7200 for light weight fun as I suffered a stroke in 2013 and have a harder time being mobile. Putting a lot of pixel density on a distant bird seems intriguing, at least in good light. I may regulate the D800 to the studio more and more and the D3S to the grandkid's baseball and football events. When birding in challenging light, the FX gear will still be the choice if I am feeling well enough to carry it afield.

I've saved very few of my older DX lenses from the past in case I ever decided to get another DX camera. That's the reason for considering the D7200. Two of them don't have focus motors so as much as I like this D5500, i can't consider it with my diabetic eyesight being less able to manually focus easily. Besides, I really prefer a real optical glass pentaprism viewfinder over a penta-mirror arrangement or an electronic viewfinder.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2015 at 00:56 UTC
On Nikon D5500 Review preview (342 comments in total)
In reply to:

koolbreez: From looking at the comparisons with the D5300, the only useful thing upgraded is the battery life. They both use the same sensor, and processing engine, so no difference in image quality. They both have the same resolutions, although the high end is listed now as regular instead of extended, which actually means no difference. Buffers are the same, shutter speads are the same. The GPS has been removed, and can't be considered an upgrade, even if people didn't use it. So how can this review state that the D5500 is an upgrade in every respect, when only one useful item has been upgraded? A better grip? There never was a problem with the old grip contributing to shaky images...lolol. This simply looks like a review to sell cameras, not print the real truth. As more time passes DPReview gets less and less reliable.

Again, typical response from the PlayStation gamer crowd who equate gee gaw features with upgrading or advancement. This is a photographic tool. The new lightweight 14.9 oz monocoque body with a better, more ergonomic feel and fit is vastly a better upgrade than all your novice feature checkboxes put together.

If you want or need more feature upgrades, feel free to consider a model upgrade to the new D7200. The D5300 to D5500 update is just the typical annual upgrade where some things get refined and the good parts don't need to be touched. These are tools to make images with. If I need more, there's the aforementioned D7200 or maybe a D750 or D810. Pick your poison but don't whine that the D5500 is not a D750, D4S, 7D MkII, etc.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2015 at 16:39 UTC
On Nikon D5500 Review preview (342 comments in total)
In reply to:

dfsaqwe: I recently sold an EM1 kit looking to downgrade to something more midrange (life+priority changes, etc). Was hoping to look back into a Nikon but I'm just thoroughly unimpressed. The technology seems almost a generation or two behind what I left behind on m43.

Also being spoiled by 5 axis sensor IS ...

I agree with Delicverator. This camera as well as most Nikon, Pentax and Canon cameras are not for your Facebook selfy, PlayStation gamer, etc. set of novice camera buffs. It is more designed as a serious tool to create images and does this job as well or better than most. Even so, it has more gee gaw features than I would choose. Add focus adjust, a second command dial and a pentaprism viewfinder, and you can keep the rest. I suppose that's why Pentax has the K3 and Nikon the D7200 for people like me, but the D5500 seems like a pretty good camera.

As far as being a generation or two behind your old m43, I think your priorities are out of line if you're serious about photography. Then again, you did say you had life+priority changes which may be the reason for your thinking especially with respect to what is technologically important in a photographic tool.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2015 at 16:17 UTC
On Nikon 1 J5: What you need to know article (493 comments in total)
In reply to:

grasscatcher: For those people wondering who the market is for a camera like this, I think a large portion of the market is birders (which can be a very lucrative market). With the 70-300 lens, they can get 800mm equivalent along with fast focus tracking and high fps in a relatively small package. It's closest competition is the FZ1000, which lacks hybrid AF, but mostly makes up for it with DFD AF. However, most birders are more comfortable with the Nikon name (as in binos), so will continue to flock to the J3/V3, no pun intended. :)

@worldcup1982 The Nikon 1 AW1 is doing very well with divers. Its waterproof, shockproof, freezeproof construction is good to 49 feet underwater and that is without the need for a bulky enclosure. You still get all the other Nikon 1 advantages like the fastest AF made and this one does 15 frames per second with AF on each frame. 60 frames per second with AF on the first. You also get built in GPS which is nice. It has two dedicated underwater lenses.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 18:09 UTC
On Nikon 1 J5: What you need to know article (493 comments in total)
In reply to:

grasscatcher: For those people wondering who the market is for a camera like this, I think a large portion of the market is birders (which can be a very lucrative market). With the 70-300 lens, they can get 800mm equivalent along with fast focus tracking and high fps in a relatively small package. It's closest competition is the FZ1000, which lacks hybrid AF, but mostly makes up for it with DFD AF. However, most birders are more comfortable with the Nikon name (as in binos), so will continue to flock to the J3/V3, no pun intended. :)

@tkbslc I agree and is why I'm considering the V3 which indeed has an eyelevel finder. Understand though, digiscopers have been mounting compact cameras on field scopes for quite a few years and have not had too much of a problem. Of course, this is mounted on a field scope which includes a tripod. They have often been doing this with tiny sensors and no stabilization. Even a gentle breeze can destroy the image, tripod or no.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 17:54 UTC
On Nikon 1 J5: What you need to know article (493 comments in total)
In reply to:

Richard Franiec: At times I try to imagine where all of largish sensor "advanced enthusiast compact" cameras will be in 3 years. Possibly they will share the demise of small sensor cams which were considered "advanced" just a few years ago. The World is shooting and sharing with smartphones which seems more than adequate for the purpose. And their users can make calls and receive Emails at the touch of a button. Each time I see new 1" compact I feel sad to see so much wasted efforts since the enthusiasts market is drifting toward the top shelf offerings from M4/3, APS-c or FF. Some of these could be on the chopping block sooner than we thought, mainly to the lack of consumer support.

@HowaboutRAW The fact we now have 13 CX native lenses available is pretty good, especially considering the 32 f/1.2 and the new 70-300 f/4.5-5.6 AFS N. Add that to the fact we can use the FT1 to mount our collection of AFS Nikon F lenses, and we have a really awesome selection to choose from, especially comparing other makers. That FT1 really makes it a great choice to augment our existing DSLR investment as we get to retain autofocus and VR. I don't think Richard and others really understand where these are being marketed these days. The Nikon 1 is no longer just a soccer mom camera anymore, if it ever really was.

With the V3 I'm considering, you get the fastest AF in the business, 20 frames per second with AF on every frame, and superb 3D tracking. Not much to complain about especially considering the rather large collection of existing Nikon glass I have. It's a pretty slick birding, wildlife and sports camera, something I don't expect from my iPhone. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 17:42 UTC
On Nikon 1 J5: What you need to know article (493 comments in total)
In reply to:

instamatic: I generally agree with Richard. I also think, than unless we have a camera that is Android (or iOS) based, fully connected via a cellular network (yes cellular, not only WI-FI) I don't see this market going anywhere but into further erosion.

The smartphone has pretty much significantly subdued, or even killed this market, and smartphone photos look excellent nowadays (I only have iPhone experience). The typical image-maker these days does not care about interchangeable lenses, and rarely knows (or cares for that matter) what depth-of-field, or lens wide-angle distortion is, so it does not matter to them, as long as they are happy with what their smartphone gives them.

I'm not sure you're even considering the market being targeted by this camera. Nikon is more and more realizing the 1 series is being considered by SLR owners as second, third or more cameras to augment their existing gear. I, for one, would never consider a Nikon 1 as a competitor to my iPhone camera. Never. I do like the fact I can use my existing Nikon glass and get a 2.7 crop factor and 20 frames per second with autofocus on every frame something a smart phone could never do very well.

Moreover, I absolutely do not want the UI my iPhone has. It's a camera and I want a camera interface. I want tactile controls. The point is they are just not meant nor do I want them to be competitors. My phone can stay being my phone. I call folks on it. I don't need to push phone selfies to my Facebook page and create a more boring timeline than it already is.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 17:24 UTC
On Nikon 1 J5: What you need to know article (493 comments in total)
In reply to:

grasscatcher: For those people wondering who the market is for a camera like this, I think a large portion of the market is birders (which can be a very lucrative market). With the 70-300 lens, they can get 800mm equivalent along with fast focus tracking and high fps in a relatively small package. It's closest competition is the FZ1000, which lacks hybrid AF, but mostly makes up for it with DFD AF. However, most birders are more comfortable with the Nikon name (as in binos), so will continue to flock to the J3/V3, no pun intended. :)

You're absolutely correct. The V3 allows one to put a lot of pixels on a distant bird and has the fastest AF and frame-rates in the business. With the V3, we can get a free FT1 adapter from Nikon and be able to mount all of our full sized birding glass to use that 2.7 crop factor. What that means is that I can take a V3 and put on my 2.0 converter and my Nikon 500 f/4 and end up being able to put 18 megapixels on a target similar to a 2700mm lens on FX. That's without using a digital zoom as with a Panasonic bridge camera.

That new Nikon CX mount 70-300 f/4.5-5.6 is also pretty amazing with a field of view reaching on out to putting those 18 megapixels on a target like an 810 lens. Also, not digital zoom though I know crop factor enlarging really is a digital operation. Still, pretty amazing for birding.

I'm not sure about the lack of an eye-level viewfinder on the J5 for birding though. We'll have to see. Digiscopers have been using LCDs for birding for quite a while, but not BIF.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 17:10 UTC
On Pentax K-3 Review preview (513 comments in total)
In reply to:

We PhotoBooth You: I still think Pentax are falling behind too much.

Why on earth would you think that? The K3 might be the most advanced APS-C camera made today. If I weren't so much invested in Nikon and Full Frame, the K3 might be my first choice for the type features advanced photographers want and need. Where else can one get a solid cast magnesium alloy weather sealed body at this price point. Where else can you get a 100% view optical glass pentaprism viewfinder at $800 street. Add in the pro level controls and ergonomics and you've got a winner well deserving of its Gold award.

For that price other brands offer a less build quality and a cruddy electronic viewfinder or pentamirrors. The Pentax is designed to appeal to real serious photographers instead of the PlayStation crowd. The K3 feature set is used to create compelling images rather than checking off whiz bang, gew gaw features which are mostly useless and shunned by long time photographers.

Is it important for your camera to have WiFi so you can pop Jpegs to your Facebook page?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 16:33 UTC
On Pentax K-3 Review preview (513 comments in total)
In reply to:

davids8560: What does it mean when you really just happen to stumble across a $100 used K-x in a garage sale, and like it so much that you decide to buy a cheap, used K-7 without even reading the reviews, and then read the reviews, and realize you really want a K-5, and then buy a brand new K-5, but after using it only five months, you impulse buy a $809 brand new K-3 with a battery grip that will probably never see any use? (The battery grip, I mean!)

GAS (gear acquisition syndrome) is a subset of NAS (Nikon acquisition syndrome) which tends to be the most virulent form of the infection. Maybe PAS is a strain which rivals NAS. I don't know. Regardless, you obviously have it and the K3 is a superb way to get it. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 16:10 UTC
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