Guidenet

Guidenet

Lives in United States Orlando, US, FL, United States
Works as a Retired Corporate Photographer
Has a website at http://faithartsvillage.com/
Joined on Sep 27, 2007
About me:

I'm a 63 year old retired corporate photographer who has also been a software engineer. My academia is largely based on Vision and my dissertation was on Fluids. I have a small studio and gallery which I enjoy on occasion. My specialty is bird photography, and I've been lucky to have had a few attempts published over the years. For the past twenty years, I worked for a large Fortune 500 company as their in-house photographer for the communications, publicity and care departments. I’ve also done their corporate meetings and events. As the company owns several television stations, making the opportunities endless.
I had to retire because I suffered a massive right side stroke in the spring of 2013. My small portrait studio and gallery are doing better than ever.
I have a daughter who is a successful Wedding Photographer. As I’ve embraced retirement, I've taken more and more shooting contracts, but only those I enjoy like the local little league baseball teams. I occasionally act as a cruise photographer for some of the cruise lines here in Florida when requested by organizations.
I also spend more and more time teaching basic photography for several resources locally as well as out of my studio located at FAVO (Faith-based Art Village of Orlando). As well as Photography, I am also a Water Color and Acrylic painter and enjoy recreating some of my favorite work in those mediums. Learning how to create art is a lifelong passion.
I'm seriously passionate about people learning exposure and the Zone System of Photography before considering themselves sufficiently astute in this craft. I’ve held several Zone System Workshops over the years as well as one Cruise based workshop. I’m also passionate about Ansel Adams’ ideas about pre-visualization. Pressing the shutter button and the camera are just one small part of the image creation process.
I started at eight years old in 1959 when my dad and I built a darkroom, him more than me. My father taught me the Zone System at a very young age. I continued as a youthful photographer, buying glass with lawn mowing money through my high school and then into college with odd jobs. I paid most of my tuition as an undergraduate shooting weddings and baby pictures as well as for the university newspaper. Many of those years I shot 4x5, 5x7 and 8x10 field cameras and sheet film. In small format, I shot Pentax until 1968 when I switched to Nikon, needing a better more professional system tool. I still shoot Nikon today as well as Nikkor lenses for some of my large format gear. I also mostly shoot digital but still maintain a darkroom for up to 5x7 format. 8x10 is stored in the attic and is only black and white. I even have a Nikkor enlarging lens. Over the years, I believe Nikon has been instrumental in the creation of truly great glass.

Comments

Total: 346, showing: 41 – 60
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On Canon announces 50mm F1.8 STM lens article (310 comments in total)
In reply to:

beavertown: Budget users should forget about Nikon from now on. This lens makes the Nikon 50mm 1.8 prime lens look exorbitant.

And therein lies the problem. If you're worried about the minor price difference between the AF-D and AF-S, then you probably have a body which can't autofocus the AF-D. If you're buying a D7100 or better camera and need a 50 f/1.8, you'll probably be able to afford a couple of hundred for the AF-S lens.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2015 at 09:25 UTC
On Canon announces 50mm F1.8 STM lens article (310 comments in total)
In reply to:

Canon EOS 60D: Canon sold its old 50mm 1.8 Mk II design to Yongnuo because China has been longing to manufacture its very own Chinese brand lenses. For sure after Yongnuo's release of 35mm f2, Canon would release a 35mm f/2 STM.

Yongnuo 50 f/1.8 at Adorama for $84.95 but backordered.

http://www.adorama.com/YN5018CAEF.html

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2015 at 09:11 UTC
On Canon announces 50mm F1.8 STM lens article (310 comments in total)
In reply to:

beavertown: Budget users should forget about Nikon from now on. This lens makes the Nikon 50mm 1.8 prime lens look exorbitant.

Not only that, but it isn't a hundred bucks. This new Canon will probably sell at $129 for a while. The Nikon sells for around $215. Now considering the Nikon comes with a hood and lens pouch which don't seem to come with the Canon, and the gap narrows. Canon will probably sell the hood for $25 and a pouch would be maybe $25 for their cheaper soft case, so now the Canon 50 f/1.8 costs $180 equivalently equipped. So at $35 difference, I think the Nikon 50 f1.8 with its superior optical formula and what still looks to be a more solid build level, makes it look the bargain here. Of course you could buy an off brand hood and pouch, but the Nikon uses Nikon so that's how I matched them, based on B&H pricing. Never the less, we won't know about these things until we try it out in hand and camera.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2015 at 08:56 UTC
On Canon announces 50mm F1.8 STM lens article (310 comments in total)

Well, this will certainly be a welcome improvement, I hope. The older model used double sided tape in its manufacturing, plastic mount, and a focus ring which was useless. You couldn't even mount a hood without an adapter.

This new model seems to cover most of those bases, but I still don't see screws so I hope they're not using that double sided tape still. I like the real bayonet hood connection, but they really should include the hood. Making you pay for what I think is a necessary part of a lens is unfortunate, and raises the price. Buy a hood and a pouch which are included with the competition and you're no longer so attractive, price-wise.

I also like the 7 blades over 5 and the closer focusing over the previous model. The overall build quality also looks better, whether or not it is. Overall, a nice offering for Canon users. Next, they need a 35 f/2 along the same lines and under $200 for their crop cameras.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2015 at 04:45 UTC as 65th comment
In reply to:

Dimit: Canon sensor...Rebel body...would anyone expect something outstanding???
We live in 2015,in a reasonable consumer world Rebels shouldn't sell over 1k pieces..totally..worldwdle !!

fmian One is fun playing around and the other is a heated political statement where both sides can back up with evidence, but I'm not going to restate this anymore. I'm only contributing to the furthering of political remarks.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2015 at 02:23 UTC
In reply to:

Dimit: Canon sensor...Rebel body...would anyone expect something outstanding???
We live in 2015,in a reasonable consumer world Rebels shouldn't sell over 1k pieces..totally..worldwdle !!

@Azurael "And neither point is really relevant to faulty filters on Canon's sensors." And is why a hot political view has no place when I was just teasing about the word Rebel. Whether true or no, even your contribution is politically argumentative at the best and highly contentious at the worst. There are many intelligent, cultured, and educated individuals on both sides of this issue, each with reams of supportive statistics, regardless of your personal viewpoint.

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2015 at 11:29 UTC
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: While I agree that there is an issue with these cameras I cringe at the fact that some people think that shooting at F32 is an essential aspect to their A-PSC photography. The earliest reports were only reporting that it was an issue at focal ratios past F20.

I suspect that most people shooting at Focal Ratios that high on a regular basis with an A-PSC camera have no clue what the depth of field actually is at that focal ratio. In addition I bet they have no clue what focal ratio yields the greatest detail across the entire frame for their particular lenses. I guarantee F32 is not the most detailed focal ratio.

@Azurael I agree. Many are making excuses with things like, you don't need those apertures, or you're hurting the Canon employees, or other companies also have issues, when that's all irrelevant. As you say, a faulty camera is indeed a faulty camera.

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2015 at 14:26 UTC
In reply to:

Dimit: Canon sensor...Rebel body...would anyone expect something outstanding???
We live in 2015,in a reasonable consumer world Rebels shouldn't sell over 1k pieces..totally..worldwdle !!

@fmian Regardless of where you got it and what some other op-ed you quote, it still is irrelevant and a personal opinion which doesn't match the rest of what you said. Many US citizens on both sides of that issue are intelligent and cultured individuals. Regardless of not wanting to discuss politics, that remark was more political rather than cultural. Note, your article is under politics, if you look at the URI. OP-Ed at best, flame bait, at worst.

In recent years, The National Journal has been criticized for hiring left-leaning journalists. I don't know or care. This really shouldn't be a political forum. My teasing about the word Rebel was in no way politically motivated.

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2015 at 12:47 UTC
In reply to:

Dimit: Canon sensor...Rebel body...would anyone expect something outstanding???
We live in 2015,in a reasonable consumer world Rebels shouldn't sell over 1k pieces..totally..worldwdle !!

@fmian You had me nodding in agreement, until you tossed in that last little piece of irrelevant op-ed personal opinion to what otherwise might have been a good point. :/

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2015 at 01:58 UTC
In reply to:

Dimit: Canon sensor...Rebel body...would anyone expect something outstanding???
We live in 2015,in a reasonable consumer world Rebels shouldn't sell over 1k pieces..totally..worldwdle !!

LOL. I know, but underneath that tape, I'd still be a Rebel, by Gawd. YeeHaw! Chew tobaccee, spit. ;-)

What was Canon thinking?

Direct link | Posted on May 5, 2015 at 00:53 UTC
In reply to:

Biowizard: And while Canon tries to add a celestial touch to its latest sensor, covering it with a veritable constellation of physical artifacts which, brilliantly, make noise at high ISO settings irrelevant to its owners (and, apparently, renters), and while Nikon continues to lubricate its sensors with shutter oil, so as to save the user buying their own can of WD40 to create the desired effects ...

... like a silent goddess from the eponymous mount, Olympus slides in to place to give those of us with faith and love for such things, the finest of all cameras.

CANIKON? No, it can't. Olympus can.

Brian

I agree. I want a camera with a small noisy sensor too. Let me buy it from a company who abandons its eponymous mounts every so often so I can reinvest in my glass. I love that, as well. I love telecentric lenses... no wait, that was their last lens mount. Maybe heliocentric this time around. It all revolves around Olympus. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on May 4, 2015 at 22:58 UTC
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: While I agree that there is an issue with these cameras I cringe at the fact that some people think that shooting at F32 is an essential aspect to their A-PSC photography. The earliest reports were only reporting that it was an issue at focal ratios past F20.

I suspect that most people shooting at Focal Ratios that high on a regular basis with an A-PSC camera have no clue what the depth of field actually is at that focal ratio. In addition I bet they have no clue what focal ratio yields the greatest detail across the entire frame for their particular lenses. I guarantee F32 is not the most detailed focal ratio.

That was my point. I do a lot of product photography where small apertures come into play. Also, some landscapes where you want a fence to frame a distant scene or a field of flowers with one up close and mountains in the background. There are many instances where I want something very close to be as sharp as possible and the same with the background. A 4.85 foot hyperfocal distance may not be enough. I've needed 12-18 inches sometimes. I admit, I do shoot full frame, but none the less.

I didn't say you were wrong so much as painting with too broad of a brush. Just like too many novice photographers excessively stop down, not understanding how to isolate, too many novice photographers over-use shallow depth of field too. Note how many over-use aperture priority, getting stuck there for life, never learning much more. :-)

Direct link | Posted on May 4, 2015 at 22:25 UTC
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: While I agree that there is an issue with these cameras I cringe at the fact that some people think that shooting at F32 is an essential aspect to their A-PSC photography. The earliest reports were only reporting that it was an issue at focal ratios past F20.

I suspect that most people shooting at Focal Ratios that high on a regular basis with an A-PSC camera have no clue what the depth of field actually is at that focal ratio. In addition I bet they have no clue what focal ratio yields the greatest detail across the entire frame for their particular lenses. I guarantee F32 is not the most detailed focal ratio.

Some have reported it being visible at f/11 and smaller. I shoot regularly at f/11, f/16 and don't mind f/22 regardless of the diffraction boogieman, especially in the studio with white seamless paper backgrounds and maximum DOF on products. You just can't paint with too broad of a brush. There are many photographic opportunities where a wide DOF is preferred. I have all my camera's sensors cleaned around once per year, professionally at the nearest manufacturer's facility because dust and specs add to processing time in removing them. I'd be one annoyed photographer if my new camera came with those built in spots.

Direct link | Posted on May 4, 2015 at 21:32 UTC
In reply to:

jrkliny: It seems to take Canon a long time to do anything. Lens Rentals notified Canon, waited 3 days and then announced the issue towards the end of last week.

By now I would have expected to at least hear that Canon is working on this issue.

I don't think it's quite been enough time. When they respond, they should probably be very sure what the issue is even if they haven't a plan yet. As mentioned, others have probably identified it, but Canon can't guess. They have to know what the problem is when they make a press release to say they are working on a solution. A guess could end up being wrong. That would amplify the damage that's already occurred.

I would expect 7-10 days to accurately identify the issue, come up with an initial plan on how to fix it, then to construct an official response. Then they can say they are working to correct this issue and formulate a return and repair policy.

Direct link | Posted on May 4, 2015 at 18:31 UTC
In reply to:

Dimit: Canon sensor...Rebel body...would anyone expect something outstanding???
We live in 2015,in a reasonable consumer world Rebels shouldn't sell over 1k pieces..totally..worldwdle !!

They can be great cameras. My only problem with CanonUSA's Rebel line is somewhat silly of me, I know, but I hate the word Rebel emblazoned in red on a camera. It strikes me as somewhat insulting to think we Americans need Rebel on a camera to be hairy chested macho Marlboro Men. They don't use Rebel anywhere else in the world. LOL Just us.

Like I said, it's not a serious objection, just a pet peeve towards Canon's US marketing arm.

Direct link | Posted on May 4, 2015 at 18:19 UTC
In reply to:

D Bowcut: My T6s sensor is fine. Camera purchased 04/26.

That's a good sign. Thanks Doug.

Edit: I think good because this might mean a faster fix for people who have the damaged ones because Canon could use non-damaged sensor arrays from the current production run.

Direct link | Posted on May 4, 2015 at 18:04 UTC
In reply to:

digiart: If the protective glass over the sensor is coated (which it probably is) this may be caused by a problem in the coating process. This seems to me a more plausible explanation than a problem in the adhesives used to put the layers of glass together.

Several labs and other facilities have looked at the issue using photomicrography and other techniques. They've measured where these bubbles actually exist. At this time, most believe it's in the layer between the outside glass and next in the adhesive, sandwiched in and not accessible via normal cleaning methods.

There are several layers to a filter array with adhesive between each. The specs are actual spherical bubbles a few mm from the actual sensor but not on the outside. That's measurable. There are now several websites with photographs, micro measurements, diagrams and other visual aides pinpointing the issue. They are not sure what caused it, but have certainly measured where it is located at this point, and it is not in the outside coating regardless on how plausible that might appear if one hasn't checked it out.

Direct link | Posted on May 3, 2015 at 15:26 UTC
In reply to:

D Bowcut: My T6s sensor is fine. Camera purchased 04/26.

I would agree. At least for the time being, I'd check it on occasion, maybe a month or so. These seem to be tiny bubbles which could be caused by the adhesive deteriorating over time. It might be a chemical reaction like oxidation. Not being a chemist, I've just theorizing, but I'd none the less do my due diligence and keep an eye on it.

Canon might do some kind of time limited repair or replacement which you could miss if you'd checked yours out, finding it clean, then assumed it remained that way.

It seems to me, since this was missed at the QA level, maybe it was because it didn't exist at that point, but might be a deterioration which developed over time and after shipping. Too early to tell, but something to consider and keep an eye on.

Direct link | Posted on May 2, 2015 at 23:52 UTC
In reply to:

D Bowcut: I "louped it" and my new T6s has a clean sensor, so I am probably the luckiest Canon purchaser in the dpreview.com diaspora. Whew!

Sensor bandwagoneers aside, before springing for the T6, I tried out the D5500 and D7200--a week each--and find this camera better or equal, respectively. Neither of the Nikon sensors demonstrated the anticipated quality issues--guess I was lucky there too.

Glad Lensrental was on-the-job. Perhaps s/n checking will help Canon track their glitch, and certainly potential buyers ought to be a bit wary. I bet many camera shops will check before purchase, but not sure about mail order...

I agree with you. As I said, return policies are good for people who find themselves with defective or a mistaken purchase. Both apply, I believe. It's the ones who buy repeated items, playing around with them and trying them out, who really need to use the Rental companies for this purpose rather than creating all those open box and used cameras for the rest of us.

Many of us, including me, detest the idea of maybe paying full price for some camera or lens someone else might have messed around with for a week or two. This is especially true when some online stores carefully repackage a returned camera or lens so it's hard to tell. It's often that or defraying the cost back to us because of open box discounts.

I would be extremely annoyed at paying full new price then finding one or two thousand clicks in the EXIF on my new camera.

I think if there are excessive clicks on a non-defective camera, there should be a restocking fee to offset the open box discount expected by the next.

Direct link | Posted on May 2, 2015 at 19:07 UTC
In reply to:

D Bowcut: I "louped it" and my new T6s has a clean sensor, so I am probably the luckiest Canon purchaser in the dpreview.com diaspora. Whew!

Sensor bandwagoneers aside, before springing for the T6, I tried out the D5500 and D7200--a week each--and find this camera better or equal, respectively. Neither of the Nikon sensors demonstrated the anticipated quality issues--guess I was lucky there too.

Glad Lensrental was on-the-job. Perhaps s/n checking will help Canon track their glitch, and certainly potential buyers ought to be a bit wary. I bet many camera shops will check before purchase, but not sure about mail order...

That was smart. Renting or borrowing a camera before purchasing just makes good sense. So many people abuse retailer's return policies these days.

Return policies are designed to protect people from defective products or mistakenly purchased products, and so they don't have to go through warranty on a product that might be dead on arrival. I believe the fraudulent use of this policy to play around with new cameras as a lazy try before you buy method just creates open boxes and used cameras for the more honest consumers, not to mention an overall higher price for everyone to offset discounts on open box models.

Rental companies exist so smart buyers like yourself who rightfully want to try before buying can do so in an above board manner. So way to go and kudos for doing it the honest way. I doubt the dishonest would admit to it in a public forum like this. :-)

Direct link | Posted on May 2, 2015 at 05:56 UTC
Total: 346, showing: 41 – 60
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