Guidenet

Guidenet

Lives in United States Orlando, US, FL, United States
Works as a Retired Corporate Photographer
Has a website at http://faithartsvillage.com/
Joined on Sep 27, 2007
About me:

I'm a 63 year old retired corporate photographer who has also been a software engineer. My academia is largely based on Vision and my dissertation was on Fluids. I have a small studio and gallery which I enjoy on occasion. My specialty is bird photography, and I've been lucky to have had a few attempts published over the years. For the past twenty years, I worked for a large Fortune 500 company as their in-house photographer for the communications, publicity and care departments. I’ve also done their corporate meetings and events. As the company owns several television stations, making the opportunities endless.
I had to retire because I suffered a massive right side stroke in the spring of 2013. My small portrait studio and gallery are doing better than ever.
I have a daughter who is a successful Wedding Photographer. As I’ve embraced retirement, I've taken more and more shooting contracts, but only those I enjoy like the local little league baseball teams. I occasionally act as a cruise photographer for some of the cruise lines here in Florida when requested by organizations.
I also spend more and more time teaching basic photography for several resources locally as well as out of my studio located at FAVO (Faith-based Art Village of Orlando). As well as Photography, I am also a Water Color and Acrylic painter and enjoy recreating some of my favorite work in those mediums. Learning how to create art is a lifelong passion.
I'm seriously passionate about people learning exposure and the Zone System of Photography before considering themselves sufficiently astute in this craft. I’ve held several Zone System Workshops over the years as well as one Cruise based workshop. I’m also passionate about Ansel Adams’ ideas about pre-visualization. Pressing the shutter button and the camera are just one small part of the image creation process.
I started at eight years old in 1959 when my dad and I built a darkroom, him more than me. My father taught me the Zone System at a very young age. I continued as a youthful photographer, buying glass with lawn mowing money through my high school and then into college with odd jobs. I paid most of my tuition as an undergraduate shooting weddings and baby pictures as well as for the university newspaper. Many of those years I shot 4x5, 5x7 and 8x10 field cameras and sheet film. In small format, I shot Pentax until 1968 when I switched to Nikon, needing a better more professional system tool. I still shoot Nikon today as well as Nikkor lenses for some of my large format gear. I also mostly shoot digital but still maintain a darkroom for up to 5x7 format. 8x10 is stored in the attic and is only black and white. I even have a Nikkor enlarging lens. Over the years, I believe Nikon has been instrumental in the creation of truly great glass.

Comments

Total: 234, showing: 1 – 20
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On Hands-on with Nikon D7200 article (53 comments in total)
In reply to:

RichRMA: The D300's "litter runt" edition 3 is born! BTW, why use a wide angle shot to make the 18-135mm lens look so much bigger than it is?

All those shots seem to have been taken with an old Canon 40D using between 52mm and 70mm focal lengths. Moreover, I believe that's the Nikon 18-140, not the somewhat smaller and long discontinued 18-135. The older lens didn't have VR and was a kit choice on the old D80 as well as a few others.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 2, 2015 at 12:27 UTC
In reply to:

JackM: I'll wait for the version that is the size of a film MX, so I can use my nice small K primes on something discrete.

I just hope there is some reason to own it alongside my Canon system. i.e., mega DR and no AA filter.

I have a feeling it will be a bit large, but wouldn't it be cool if it were the size of the MX. I might would get one to go along with my Nikon system. Well, maybe. Retirement stretches things a little.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 11, 2015 at 06:17 UTC
In reply to:

Lassoni: Nikon needs to start moving that 300 PF, or atleast provide better sample images. I'm dying to know more about this lens, but the images they have don't really tell that much. If anything, they leave a sour impression of what it can do.

Agreed. Several good reviews from the better sources would be a whole lot better than sample images on the Web. On the Web, you'd have a hard time picking between birds in flight I took with my Nikon 300 f/2.8 AFS VR and my 70-300 f/4.5-5.6 AFS VR. The Web just can't show that level of quality unless you download the NEF files and look carefully.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 14:08 UTC
In reply to:

Naveed Akhtar: Go with the mainstream fullframe camera guys .. it will take ages, to fuji, to develop lenses for this new system.

@Tabaplar, you might very well be wrong. I don't know, but maybe history will repeat. At one time, Pentax was a huge competitor in the professional SLR marketplace. It was more Pentax verses Nikon, not Canon. Pentax made the exquisite jewel-like small cameras with the superb Takumar lenses while Nikon made the larger, more robust systems camera with user interchangeable finders, motordrives, backs and focus screens. With Nikon, you could just grab these things off the shelf and they'd work, while you'd have to send the Pentax in if you wanted to fit a motordrive and 250 bulk film pack et al. Pentax finally released the LX model but it was really too late and they'd lost most of their professional dominance to Canon by then, in my opinion, but I think the LX was the better camera.

That's what I think has always been a Pentax issue, being just a little too late in recognizing the trend. Pentax was a serious joy to use though, and history could repeat where Pentax could be pro again.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 23:30 UTC
In reply to:

Dennis: The real innovation here is that it's destined to be the first full frame digital camera to be offered in 17 different colors.

@TurvyT, again, it was a joke and I don't see anyone complaining about Pentax offering color choices. Who really cares? If Pentax marketing thinks pink and yellow cameras will help to sell them, more power to them. If Nikon made the type gear I buy in multiple colors, I might get one too just to be different, if it didn't cost more. They are just tools to get a job done, not something to cause religious fervor. I wouldn't pay a dime more for a yellow screwdriver over a black one. ;-)

One thing though, the camera color would absolutely be the last thing I'd consider in a purchase decision. As far as vehicles go, it's different. I always buy red pickup trucks. It's pragmatic because red just about always has a higher resale value later when it's time to get a new one.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 15:40 UTC
In reply to:

Naveed Akhtar: Go with the mainstream fullframe camera guys .. it will take ages, to fuji, to develop lenses for this new system.

@Naveed, I agree with you about the use of APS-C glass in a crop mode and the use of adapters. I like neither, but I think Pentax still makes a good number of full frame lenses themselves which will work natively with a new Pentax full frame camera. Like others, they have maintained compatibility with older film cameras as well as the fact, often crop lenses really don't save that much size and weight.

As was also mentioned, many new third party optics are also native full frame in K-Mount. The availability of these Pentax and Pentax mount full fame lenses will be a real boon to users from the very start without needing adapters or used glass, though nothing wrong with used glass. ;-)

It's a lot different than the Sony situation where the backward compatibility was only extended to Minolta Maximm glass without adapters, some of dubious quality while some quite good.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 15:14 UTC
In reply to:

Naveed Akhtar: Go with the mainstream fullframe camera guys .. it will take ages, to fuji, to develop lenses for this new system.

I'm not sure why Fuji will develop anything for a full frame Pentax, but as ragmanjin said, there are a plethora of choices out there now by Pentax and other optics makers. I just don't see lens availability as an obstacle for Pentax. They're been at it a long long time. The K Mount has a long history of supplying quality optics.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 13:37 UTC

I love Pentax coming out with a full frame model finally. I switched from Pentax to Nikon in 1968 because I wanted more of a systems camera, but have a soft spot for my first SLRs. When I went digital, I almost went back, but held off and as time went by and no FF, they went out of consideration. Retired now and I've got way too much invested in Nikon gear, but I love what Pentax is doing. I'm sure they will implement it very well. It's another great choice for up and coming enthusiasts and professionals. Kudos to Pentax.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 13:28 UTC as 9th comment
In reply to:

Dennis: The real innovation here is that it's destined to be the first full frame digital camera to be offered in 17 different colors.

@Simen01, it was a joke. It's not a religion. Get it? Don't take yourself too seriously. It was funny, too. :-)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 13:18 UTC
In reply to:

Leok: I decided this wasn't going to happen 4 years ago (despite annual rumours to the contrary). Sold all my Pentax gear and went Nikon instead. I'm so glad I did, no FF for all this time is why Pentax hasn't been taken seriously in the digital era.

@Simen01 People don't bash or troll Pentax any more than any other brand out there. Don't be paranoid. If anyone, Sony probably gets the worst of it. For many, brand ownership is a religion. They will bash anything they don't personally own and claim being bashed by all the others. The old Chevy / Ford or Apple / Windows mentality.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 13:14 UTC
In reply to:

Lassoni: Nikon needs to start moving that 300 PF, or atleast provide better sample images. I'm dying to know more about this lens, but the images they have don't really tell that much. If anything, they leave a sour impression of what it can do.

Sample images viewed on the Web is about the most ridiculous way to judge the optics of a lens. You're viewing 8 bit lossy format Jpegs probably with a 6 bit uncalibrated TN monitor. Moreover, you probably do not know the camera's settings nor any settings applied during processing. How would that in the least help a person in making a $2000 purchase?

If you could download high quality RAW files captured by a good photographer then printed them with a quality printer, you might be able to tell something, but otherwise, it's pretty useless. I guess I don't understand people caring about sample images from a lens or camera in a review.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2015 at 12:25 UTC
On Sony launches support program for pro photographers article (115 comments in total)
In reply to:

Guidenet: I'm not sure charging $100 is a wise idea. It sends a message. My NPS membership has always been free which I appreciate. This also sends a message. If Sony were to open it up to every weekend warrior with a crop camera body, the system would become too diluted for the average pro to consider useful.

Part of what Sony has to overcome is their reputation. Not having a couple of solid full frame DSLRs doesn't help that reputation.

Well, that's too bad. If you want, PM me your real name if this is not and a contact number. I'd be happy to call on your behalf and tell someone to call you. I can't guarantee anything, but I'd be happy to try. Maybe there's some kind of glitch with respect to your ID and the database. I don't know. It just seems as if you were connected to an off shore call center for consumers. :-)

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2014 at 12:17 UTC
On Sony launches support program for pro photographers article (115 comments in total)
In reply to:

Guidenet: I'm not sure charging $100 is a wise idea. It sends a message. My NPS membership has always been free which I appreciate. This also sends a message. If Sony were to open it up to every weekend warrior with a crop camera body, the system would become too diluted for the average pro to consider useful.

Part of what Sony has to overcome is their reputation. Not having a couple of solid full frame DSLRs doesn't help that reputation.

Well my experiences have been entirely different. I can talk freely with my assigned rep in Melville without issue. They've done a repair at no charge out of warranty and many other good things over the years. They even overnighted some loaner gear to my hotel room in Texas where I'd been burglarized right before a shoot. They even suggested it as I was just calling for serial numbers for the police report. Moreover, I've never been sent to an offshore call center.

Are you sure you're dealing with NPS? Sounds like a standard consumer's call center. I'm not calling you out, but your and my experiences are entirely different on many levels.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2014 at 10:24 UTC
On Sony launches support program for pro photographers article (115 comments in total)
In reply to:

Guidenet: I'm not sure charging $100 is a wise idea. It sends a message. My NPS membership has always been free which I appreciate. This also sends a message. If Sony were to open it up to every weekend warrior with a crop camera body, the system would become too diluted for the average pro to consider useful.

Part of what Sony has to overcome is their reputation. Not having a couple of solid full frame DSLRs doesn't help that reputation.

Paul, I'm not sure you have ever been a member of NPS so wouldn't know. I've had great experiences with NPS over the years, especially with loaner equipment. Can you recount a personal experience with NPS where you can show credence to your remark? Otherwise, it sounds like another case of Nikon envy to me.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2014 at 03:02 UTC
On Sony launches support program for pro photographers article (115 comments in total)

I'm not sure charging $100 is a wise idea. It sends a message. My NPS membership has always been free which I appreciate. This also sends a message. If Sony were to open it up to every weekend warrior with a crop camera body, the system would become too diluted for the average pro to consider useful.

Part of what Sony has to overcome is their reputation. Not having a couple of solid full frame DSLRs doesn't help that reputation.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 3, 2014 at 01:55 UTC as 6th comment | 7 replies
On The elegant Great Egret (Ardea alba) Landing photo in Guidenet's photo gallery (2 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tidewater: Interesting photo and description. Wing structure is so elegant. Unfortunately i meet a lot of bird photographers who are not nature lovers but just looking for a subject to shoot.

Thank you for your kind words. I love the wetlands too.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2014 at 10:05 UTC
On Nikon D7100 In-Depth Review preview (98 comments in total)
In reply to:

Westmill: Actions speak louder than words..... Just ordered a second body :)
Sigma 18-35 F1.8 on one body and the Sigma 50-150 F2.8 on the other !
Also ordered the 18-140 as a walkabout for when I am not in the mood for carrying a lot of weight :)
Still waiting for the D400 though... grrrrrr Please wake up NIKON !!!!!!!

Birders and macro shooters should understand that a smaller sensor just makes a smaller crop of a larger image, whatever that image is. No enlargement occurs. The bird is the same size on a crop sensor as on FX. There's just less space around him. The crop sensor just could maybe help you put more pixels on the target. I'd rather have all the advantages of FX, then crop after the fact, if I need to do so.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 20, 2014 at 06:34 UTC
On Nikon D7100 In-Depth Review preview (98 comments in total)
In reply to:

Westmill: Actions speak louder than words..... Just ordered a second body :)
Sigma 18-35 F1.8 on one body and the Sigma 50-150 F2.8 on the other !
Also ordered the 18-140 as a walkabout for when I am not in the mood for carrying a lot of weight :)
Still waiting for the D400 though... grrrrrr Please wake up NIKON !!!!!!!

I just don't see any reason for a D400. If you want and need pro-level features, you don't need to be spinning your wheels on APS-C. Nikon isn't really doing much in the way of DX glass anyway.

Why no go ahead and move up to FX and invest in FX glass? I would imagine that as a percentage people wanting more than entry level, those satisfied with the D7100 make up the most. Those of us Who want or need that next step above the D7100 have long since migrated to FX.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2014 at 17:16 UTC
On What just happened?! Looking back on last week article (98 comments in total)
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: Sony has really given FF a shot in the arm. If a person has stayed away from FF because of size, weight or cost, Sony has addressed all those things. And once somebody shoots 24mp or more, full frame, they're not going back to 4/3 or smaller. This is the one thing that has remained constant since film and across all brands; the bigger the sensor, the better the image quality. Fuji, in particular makes great use of small sensors--that is, until you see what they can do with bigger sensors.

If Sony has addressed size weight, and cost perspectives not already addressed by the Nikon D600 or Canon 6D, I'm not sure what they are. There has to be some low hanging fruit, but Sony has been really late on going after it.

Without a doubt, FF is not only here to stay but other orientations might be regulated to the snapshooters.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 23, 2013 at 17:43 UTC
In reply to:

HeyItsJoel: I'll never understand why Nikon insist on starting their kit lenses at 18mm when the ideal length to start is @ 16mm (~24mm fov).

I think 18mm just happens to be easier to design and a good place to start for most. It will take most photographers years to learn how to properly use a lens wider than that. To "Get it all in" is a pretty poor reason, in my opinion.

Using a wide angle to help you emphasize depth and space is where the wider fields of view come in handy. You need to learn how to get closer, not get in more on the sides. :-)

Direct link | Posted on Oct 23, 2013 at 11:43 UTC
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