PIX 2015
Guidenet

Guidenet

Lives in United States Orlando, US, FL, United States
Works as a Retired Corporate Photographer
Has a website at http://faithartsvillage.com/
Joined on Sep 27, 2007
About me:

I'm a 64 year old retired corporate photographer who has also been a software engineer. My academia is largely based on Vision and my dissertation was on Fluids. Much of my post work was involved in research mostly in the realm of massively parallel systems like BSP. I have a small studio and gallery which I enjoy on occasion. My specialty is bird photography, and I've been lucky to have had a few attempts published over the years. For the past twenty years, I worked for a large Fortune 500 company as their in-house photographer for the communications, publicity and care departments. I’ve also done their corporate meetings and events. As the company owns several television stations, making the opportunities endless.
I had to retire because I suffered a massive right side stroke in the spring of 2013. My small portrait studio and gallery are doing better than ever.
I have a daughter who is a successful Wedding Photographer. As I’ve embraced retirement, I've taken more and more shooting contracts, but only those I enjoy like the local little league baseball teams. I occasionally act as a cruise photographer for some of the cruise lines here in Florida when requested by organizations.
I also spend more and more time teaching basic photography for several resources locally as well as out of my studio located at FAVO (Faith-based Art Village of Orlando). As well as Photography, I am also a Water Color and Acrylic painter and enjoy recreating some of my favorite work in those mediums. Learning how to create art is a lifelong passion.
I'm seriously passionate about people learning exposure and the Zone System of Photography before considering themselves sufficiently astute in this craft. I’ve held several Zone System Workshops over the years as well as one Cruise based workshop. I’m also passionate about Ansel Adams’ ideas about pre-visualization. Pressing the shutter button and the camera are just one small part of the image creation process.
I started at eight years old in 1959 when my dad and I built a darkroom, him more than me. My father taught me the Zone System at a very young age. I continued as a youthful photographer, buying glass with lawn mowing money through my high school and then into college with odd jobs. I paid most of my tuition as an undergraduate shooting weddings and baby pictures as well as for the university newspaper. Many of those years I shot 4x5, 5x7 and 8x10 field cameras and sheet film. In small format, I shot Pentax until 1968 when I switched to Nikon, needing a better more professional system tool. I still shoot Nikon today as well as Nikkor lenses for some of my large format gear. I also mostly shoot digital but still maintain a darkroom for up to 5x7 format. 8x10 is stored in the attic and is only black and white. I even have a Nikkor enlarging lens. Over the years, I believe Nikon has been instrumental in the creation of truly great glass.

Comments

Total: 347, showing: 1 – 20
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I think it's an awesome image. I have no problem with Photoshop, multiple images or anything else. Photography is not about trying to Xerox reality. That's impossible anyway. It's also not about pure illustration. It's about creating what is in your mind's eye. I think some of these comments are by envious folks who find themselves lacking in creativity.

Whether one likes this particular art, it certainly is creative and that's what's important in my opinion. Just like a movie can be fiction, a painting doesn't need to be photorealistic, a photograph doesn't need to be a static snapshot. I think a good image comes from the rendering of a previsualized image created your mind's eye. Much comes from what is accomplished in the darkroom or modern version of a darkroom. Anyone can press a shutter button. It takes more to be creative, whether with oils, acrylics or a camera.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 11, 2015 at 16:01 UTC as 92nd comment
On Canon EOS Rebel T6i Review preview (302 comments in total)
In reply to:

fuxicek: I wish the successor to canon 100d/sl1 would be more more rebellious, with evf, rangefinder style and with some automatic panorama mode..

@fuxicek Yeah, that's what we need, another PlayStation Walmart point and shoot. That's rebellious! They can get rid of that optical reflex viewfinder and substitute a cheap EFV. Then add a bunch of "Make Art" buttons for the wannabes photographers. While we're about it, make it look like a 1950s rangefinder so we can wear it like a fashion accessory.

I actually thought we had too many of these whiz bang glorified point and shoots to satisfy most everyone wanting to make their mark in photography, but I guess we could lower the bar some more. Maybe one that plays music downloads as you're photographing.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 1, 2015 at 22:21 UTC
In reply to:

Mrrowe8: Sadly much like the T-Rex , Hasselblad & Leica days have come and gone .. They use to be what ALL real photographers aspired to own as it represented the BEST .. Now however they are in most cases overpriced hipster junk .. If they focused on specialty fields maybe they can inch back into the real world .. But now they are just a dull filler story ..

@REDred Photo I wasn't denigrating your use of film in the least. Mostly I was merely attempting to say the obvious, that these tools contribute little to what makes an image inspiring or compelling. If an image is successful, it matters little as to the medium. If it fails, changing the medium won't make it successful.

Now retired, I've also been a working professional corporate photographer for over 45 years. Today I have just two small studios and a gallery to take up my time. Though I never really got involved with medium format, I don't think it matters much. I shoot LF because it's fun and small (35mm) because it's practical.

The one thing that just never impressed me was the coolness factor. I used to put gaffer's tape or nail polish over the Nikon nameplate when I was younger. To purchase a tool because of how it looks strike me as incredible. It's like buying a new paintbrush because how another artist would judge my work (I'm a watercolor and acrylic painter as well).

Direct link | Posted on Jun 25, 2015 at 23:05 UTC
In reply to:

Mrrowe8: Sadly much like the T-Rex , Hasselblad & Leica days have come and gone .. They use to be what ALL real photographers aspired to own as it represented the BEST .. Now however they are in most cases overpriced hipster junk .. If they focused on specialty fields maybe they can inch back into the real world .. But now they are just a dull filler story ..

@REDred Photo Everyone's camera can continue to produce images of "exquisite clarity, subtlety, and beauty" providing the person holding that camera can produce images of exquisite clarity, subtlety, and beauty. Hasselblad, Leica, Nikon, Sony, etc. et al, whether film or digital, have very little to do with this, fortunately.

When camera companies and purchasers fail to understand this easy concept, that's when we don't get images with exquisite clarity, subtlety, and beauty. Instead we get feature laden Walmart toys, carved wood grips, cameras only capable of black and white, and retro designed fashion-ware like the Nikon DF, the various Fuji and other Leica wannabes (including Leica).

Many buyers these days would love a "Make Art" button on the top to go with the Intelligent(?) Auto, Av and Tv choices. Just press that shutter button, figure out what that is in front of me and then give me "artsy." Oh, and did you notice my Rolex? ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 25, 2015 at 18:28 UTC
On Leica Q First Impressions Review preview (576 comments in total)
In reply to:

darngooddesign: For everyone arguing the price, the Q is only around $1k USD more expensive than a new RX1 + EVF. Now a grand is nothing to sneeze at, but hardly the traditional Leica premium.

@richtea777 Over the many years, that Steal Me principle has been important for me and I think others. I've been on so many location events and have had so much stolen over the past fifty years, it becomes a consideration. You can't completely erase this possibility, but you can minimize it.

Some easy ways such as replacing that Canon or Leica strap for something less obvious can help. I often buy Think Tank gear bags because many don't look so much like camera bags. Early in my career, I'd often paint over the word Nikon or Pentax on the camera to slightly minimize attention. Sometimes black tape worked.

For a professional, perception is often a key factor even though we might not like it. Stigmas can make a difference. Clients, these days, often look at one's gear and may judge the output more critically if they deem you aren't using professional caliber equipment. One need look at some of the recent law suits to see this in action. We might not agree, but it happens.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2015 at 14:06 UTC
On Leica Q First Impressions Review preview (576 comments in total)
In reply to:

Poss: I do not understand the jabs at the luxury market. It's a valid market as any of the other ones.

Besides it was a Rolex that reached the deepest ocean point in 2012 and an Omega Speedmaster at Neil Armstrong's wrist when he stepped on the Moon, not a cheap Chinese knockoff. Want to see what technology will eventually filter down to the automotive consumer level? Watch what Mercedes is putting on their flagship S series sedans. And so on.

If anything this looks like a well sorted camera for which Leica can comfortably charge a premium price. Much like Porsche can (and does) charge for a Cayenne or Omega does for the current Speedmaster (very different than the one used in the Apollo program) or Apple does for an iPhone.

Some brands enjoy having a very loyal following for very good reasons and when we belittle them, we tend to sound more like an acute case of sour grapes.

@richtea777 You're so very right. I apologize. I merely find using a camera as a fashion accessory amusing and sometimes fail to understand others might have a need there. My almost fifty years as a jobbing professional photographer can truly jade my viewpoint.

For so many years I've advised to ignore the camera and invest one's time and money in learning photography, that it's the photographer, not the camera. I guess I might forget that for some it really is the camera, not what they do with it. Yes, for some, looking and feeling good is the important thing and you're right, there's nothing wrong with that.

Thanks for the reality check. :-)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2015 at 13:42 UTC
On Leica Q First Impressions Review preview (576 comments in total)
In reply to:

Paul Petersen: I think I would get better results with a Sigma 18-35 on my D7200 and have some flexibility all the way around. Leica's 24mp FF seems to be a bit of dog in sensor performance. But I would look so cool with one to those that actually know what a Leica is.

Again, that BS meter just pegs right over. Color? What world are you from? Good glass should be color neutral and a Zeiss labeled Consina lens has no better color than anyone else except in the eyes of someone impressed by that label. Most experienced photographers in this price range do not shoot SOOTC Jpegs, so color correction and white balance are often post operations.

When the sunlight filters through green foliage and tints your subject's skin tones, you color correct it. We did this in the darkroom for years. We still do it today. Your glass has little to do with it.

You claim to have all this experience with photography, but it surely doesn't show by your remarks on the subject. It's more a mimicry of some Zeiss press release.

It is so typical of self proclaimed photography gurus who have nothing much in their gallery and no links to any of their work, as well a no profile, total anonymity and nothing in their gear list after 4 years membership. Knock knock Mcfly. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2015 at 13:20 UTC
On Leica Q First Impressions Review preview (576 comments in total)
In reply to:

Paul Petersen: I think I would get better results with a Sigma 18-35 on my D7200 and have some flexibility all the way around. Leica's 24mp FF seems to be a bit of dog in sensor performance. But I would look so cool with one to those that actually know what a Leica is.

Typical fanboi. The Leica label nor the Zeiss labeled Consina glass doesn't automatically imply great performance. In fact, I found the Zeiss 85 f/1.4 to be sub-par when considering a new portrait lens for my studio when my Nikon 85 f/1.4D was stolen. Though I ended up with the G version, my experience with the cheaper Sigma 85 f/1.4 HSM (non-ART) was all around superior to the Zeiss offering.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2015 at 12:18 UTC
On Leica Q First Impressions Review preview (576 comments in total)
In reply to:

darngooddesign: For everyone arguing the price, the Q is only around $1k USD more expensive than a new RX1 + EVF. Now a grand is nothing to sneeze at, but hardly the traditional Leica premium.

@darngooddesign But there are not many comparable cameras. This is a fairly unique model, and as I said, allows price gouging to occur. That's just what it is.

Obviously, I have little use for a camera of this type. I don't believe I'd pay $1000 for the RX1 or much more for the Leica. In fact, I'd probably avoid the Leica at any price for two reasons. One is the stigma attached these days and secondly is that red emblem which shouts "Steal Me" in plain and obvious sight emblazoned on the front of it.

If spending $4000 on a compact somehow brought something important to my work, I suppose I could peal off the red sticker and change that "steal me" neck strap. However, a $4000 compact with a fixed moderate wide lens doesn't add anything to a photographer's ability to help create images that I can see.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2015 at 11:57 UTC
On Leica Q First Impressions Review preview (576 comments in total)
In reply to:

Poss: I do not understand the jabs at the luxury market. It's a valid market as any of the other ones.

Besides it was a Rolex that reached the deepest ocean point in 2012 and an Omega Speedmaster at Neil Armstrong's wrist when he stepped on the Moon, not a cheap Chinese knockoff. Want to see what technology will eventually filter down to the automotive consumer level? Watch what Mercedes is putting on their flagship S series sedans. And so on.

If anything this looks like a well sorted camera for which Leica can comfortably charge a premium price. Much like Porsche can (and does) charge for a Cayenne or Omega does for the current Speedmaster (very different than the one used in the Apollo program) or Apple does for an iPhone.

Some brands enjoy having a very loyal following for very good reasons and when we belittle them, we tend to sound more like an acute case of sour grapes.

Again, this shouldn't be so hard to understand. I, for one, said nothing about a Leica's worthiness as a camera. Did you somehow read that in? Try the very first line of my reply above. Read it maybe twice and ponder the meaning. Then reread the last paragraph in its entirety. Ponder how that fits with the first paragraph.

Next, read what you said and consider how you came up with your reply. More importantly is the question concerning why you came up with that complete misunderstanding and lack of insight. Maybe English is not your first language.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2015 at 11:37 UTC
On Leica Q First Impressions Review preview (576 comments in total)
In reply to:

Poss: I do not understand the jabs at the luxury market. It's a valid market as any of the other ones.

Besides it was a Rolex that reached the deepest ocean point in 2012 and an Omega Speedmaster at Neil Armstrong's wrist when he stepped on the Moon, not a cheap Chinese knockoff. Want to see what technology will eventually filter down to the automotive consumer level? Watch what Mercedes is putting on their flagship S series sedans. And so on.

If anything this looks like a well sorted camera for which Leica can comfortably charge a premium price. Much like Porsche can (and does) charge for a Cayenne or Omega does for the current Speedmaster (very different than the one used in the Apollo program) or Apple does for an iPhone.

Some brands enjoy having a very loyal following for very good reasons and when we belittle them, we tend to sound more like an acute case of sour grapes.

Hah, but most jabs are not at the product nor the companies, but at the reason many make these purchases. Moreover, you mistake the suggestion of sour grapes. Many of us just find it humorous and are proud of using our gear in attempt to create compelling images. It's also not money. Many of us spend far more over our lifetimes than the typical Leica owner might.

Who cares how deep a Rolex has dived or whether an Omega has been to the moon. How many buyers will go on such adventures? Do they keep time well? People buy refrigerators to keep their beer cold, watches to keep time, and cameras to help them as tools to make images. Not so much to go to the moon or wear to a cocktail party.

Personally, I currently own two Leicas. I just wouldn't consider a new one today. I don't think they are worth anywhere close to the premium price asked and am not sure I want the associated stigma. Early in my career, I sometimes painted out camera logos to get away from that.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2015 at 00:44 UTC
On Leica Q First Impressions Review preview (576 comments in total)
In reply to:

darngooddesign: For everyone arguing the price, the Q is only around $1k USD more expensive than a new RX1 + EVF. Now a grand is nothing to sneeze at, but hardly the traditional Leica premium.

Just because the assembly line might be in Germany does not ensure the work force is blond haired, blue eyed highly trained Germans. Many Eastern lines have highly trained technical workers as well. I'm not sure how wise it might be to pay a premium for factory location.

We don't need a comparable camera to ascertain whether or not the RX1 is overpriced. It's more of an opinion. Besides there are cameras of similar ilk which have a smaller sensor but are priced significantly less, even considering the lesser sensor. Because this genre is somewhat unique, price gouging can be employed.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2015 at 00:17 UTC
On Leica Q First Impressions Review preview (576 comments in total)
In reply to:

darngooddesign: For everyone arguing the price, the Q is only around $1k USD more expensive than a new RX1 + EVF. Now a grand is nothing to sneeze at, but hardly the traditional Leica premium.

@darngooddesign Good point, but there's that same question. Is indeed the RX1 not severely overpriced as well? Why a premium to shoehorn an FF sensor in a compact body these days? They're shoving an iPhone into a wristwatch. Moreover, I'm clearly not impressed by the idea some brand of camera deserves any particular premium over another brand just based on name.

If this were the case, Hasselblad should have made a fortune gluing those wood appliques to those Sony Nex models. I think Leica has mostly created a niche market among trophy hunter types. This is not speaking in the pejorative with respect to the camera, but more to many of the people who seek such trophies.

I love the F-Stopper Nikon DF review video. It speaks volumes to the nature of people who buy for looks over utility in a tool.

https://fstoppers.com/gear/fstoppers-nikon-df-camera-hipster-review-8277

Direct link | Posted on Jun 12, 2015 at 22:56 UTC
On Leica Q First Impressions Review preview (576 comments in total)

Have to love this stuff. Another fashion statement with the likes of Fuji and the Nikon DF. I particularly enjoyed remarks like: "The Leica Q is not a four thousand dollar fashion accessory." Then shortly there after: "The Q is a camera that makes me excited" and "The Leica Q may be fashionable, but it is also functional."

Then, "A day with the Leica Q may have taken the sparkle out of my Fujifilm X100T." I guess so. With the Leica you can wear it with your Giorio Armani jacket and Rolex watch. The Fuji X100T is more in line with a Bolex watch from a Hong Kong lookalike. That Hong Kong tailor can also make you a nice faux Armani jacket to go with the whole set up.

Remember that Fuji ad a couple of months ago with the redhead gal and her demurring attitude stating, "The camera you wear is as important as the pictures you make." As insulting as that may sound, it was certainly aimed at their intended audience. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 12, 2015 at 17:15 UTC as 63rd comment
On Mono a mono: Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246) hands-on article (683 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: princecody,

There's no LCD on the back of the M246? Odd, the M240 has one, as does image 7 above.

AF is over-rated, except for sports.

@J GGG I must certainly be a boy when I carefully compose my shot well beyond some decisive moment and take my time using a loupe to make sure I'm focused properly while viewing the ground glass on my 5x7 Deardorff with my Nikkor 90 f/8 SW mounted. I also spend my boyish hours in the darkroom processing. I'm proud to be among other boys who do it similarly.

In small format I must not be passionate because I prefer autofocus systems. We're a bunch of boys compared to those trendy cool talking Leica Men. They dress just perfectly and enter the room at that "decisive moment" to make that manly retro-look impression. Wow, I'm impressed. Love that Rolex too. I pre-focused on it as you entered among us. I wish I could be a passionate GQ kind of Man. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 10, 2015 at 16:50 UTC
On Pentax K-3 Review preview (521 comments in total)
In reply to:

We PhotoBooth You: I still think Pentax are falling behind too much.

@Hansel300 Sorry pal, but that is about the most fanboi response I've seen in quite a while. It's basically ridiculous and misleading to say the least. How about the same sensor which might be in some Pentax is the same as might be in a Nikon or Sony? This means the RAW capability is the same.

If you're talking default Jpeg results, the argument becomes even more silly. That's like buying a radio because you like what channel it was turned to in the store. If you think Nikon has muted colors, dial them where you like them. If I think my Pentax is overly cartoonish, I can dial them down. In fact, I flat out guaranty I can set any Pentax so you can't tell it from any Nikon. Period.

Besides, how many photographers these days who would consider an up-spec'd K3 type camera shoot in Jpeg, much less default Jpeg? We generally shoot in RAW because we are concerned with image quality, and yes, image quality is important, but less than composition. With RAW, there is near zero difference.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 8, 2015 at 14:28 UTC
On Mono a mono: Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246) hands-on article (683 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: princecody,

There's no LCD on the back of the M246? Odd, the M240 has one, as does image 7 above.

AF is over-rated, except for sports.

There was once guess focusing, then range finder, then ttl and now autofocusing. There was once tin type, then sepia toning, then black and white, then 2 color, then 3 color and now digital color. It's always been interesting to note, there have always been some who take refuge by trying to be trendy in moving backwards. ;-)

This refuge is often barrier against appearing incompetent. It's a little like changing a failed color image to black and white in order to save it, hoping for artsy. You just can't save a failed image in this manner. A failed color image will generally be a failed black and white image. A failure in autofocusing will generally translate in poorly focused manually focused images. Understanding and mastering the core techniques generally provides better success. :-)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 5, 2015 at 20:53 UTC
On Nikon D7200 Review preview (573 comments in total)
In reply to:

Papi61: Nowadays lots of videographers buy DSLR's and mirrorless cameras for video. Canon and Nikon are deliberately ignoring this and their camera sales are going south accordingly.

I'm a Nikon shooter and I would have loved to buy a D7200 with 4K video. Instead I bought a Samsung NX1. To my surprise, it bested my D5300 and even D750 (except for high ISO on the latter) even as a still camera. If Samsung keeps releasing bodies like this and adds a sufficient number of lenses to become competitive with Canon/Nikon, I seriously doubt I will stay in the Nikon camp in the future.

Next time I see one, I'll take a better look. :-)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 5, 2015 at 20:38 UTC
On Nikon D7200 Review preview (573 comments in total)
In reply to:

Papi61: Nowadays lots of videographers buy DSLR's and mirrorless cameras for video. Canon and Nikon are deliberately ignoring this and their camera sales are going south accordingly.

I'm a Nikon shooter and I would have loved to buy a D7200 with 4K video. Instead I bought a Samsung NX1. To my surprise, it bested my D5300 and even D750 (except for high ISO on the latter) even as a still camera. If Samsung keeps releasing bodies like this and adds a sufficient number of lenses to become competitive with Canon/Nikon, I seriously doubt I will stay in the Nikon camp in the future.

@tecnoworld 75%-80% is very subjective. For me, Samsung's selection would not meet anywhere close to my needs. I'm a wide angle nut and a avid birder as a hobby, both needs not met. As a professional studio portrait and product photographer, one need is met with that 85 f/1.4 except there are no full frame models, making nothing met in the least.

Moreover, I'm not sure the body is that good. When you strip off the whiz kid feature set, it strikes me as a fairly ordinary APS-C camera. For example, none of my cameras even have an Auto Mode, much less scene modes and artsy filters to get in my way and that's the way I want to keep it. I believe many of these Playstation type features just lull beginners into thinking they can make a menu choice instead of learning photographic techniques. They think they are getting a Giorgio Armani jacket but when they open the bag, they find a Walmart sweatshirt.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 5, 2015 at 13:07 UTC
On Nikon D7200 Review preview (573 comments in total)
In reply to:

Papi61: Nowadays lots of videographers buy DSLR's and mirrorless cameras for video. Canon and Nikon are deliberately ignoring this and their camera sales are going south accordingly.

I'm a Nikon shooter and I would have loved to buy a D7200 with 4K video. Instead I bought a Samsung NX1. To my surprise, it bested my D5300 and even D750 (except for high ISO on the latter) even as a still camera. If Samsung keeps releasing bodies like this and adds a sufficient number of lenses to become competitive with Canon/Nikon, I seriously doubt I will stay in the Nikon camp in the future.

@tecnoworld .. etc. Now consider Nikon as an example. I've got four 24mm prime lenses to choose from. They are different for different needs. I have three 20mm primes. Again, different to match my needs.

They have five 85mm prime lenses with different attributes for various needs, two of them macro, one inexpensive and one expensive with movements for product photographers. Compare this to Samsung offering one $1000 85mm with no macro capability. Which way is a system and which way gives me choice? Again, I don't need all five, but I may need one of those 85mm lenses to match the use I wish to put it to. If that one Samsung 85 f/1.4 fails to meet my needs or budget, there's nothing to fall back on. I'm out of luck.

All systems fail some places, but Samsung fails way too much for me to consider it a systems camera or to advise it for any serious photographic endeavor. It'll take decades for them to patch things up if they even attempt to. They should have adopted the Pentax K mount.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 5, 2015 at 12:23 UTC
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