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SteB

Lives in United Kingdom North Shropshire, United Kingdom
Joined on Apr 3, 2007

Comments

Total: 174, showing: 1 – 20
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I assume that the 0.49x magnification is a 35mm film (FF) equivalent, because 0.49X magnification on a 1 inch sensor would be super close. Is it a 35mm film equivalent magnification?

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2016 at 20:28 UTC as 21st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

SteB: Just an observation. I think to an extent this situation has been set up by Dpreview highlighting ISO invariance and DR as something which was lagging behind on Canon, and where Sony and Nikon were ahead of the curve. In other words the implication was that Nikon DSLRs were better because of the generally better DR of their sensors. Whereas of course better has always been a relative term, and there is much more to a camera and a system than just this particular test.

Now that Canon DSLRs are starting to apparently use a new generation of sensors with on sensor ADC, this scenario is no longer so clear. It is almost certain that the new Canon 1DX mkII will perform much better on Dpreviews DR and ISO invariance tests, than the D5. This will obviously upset the meme that Nikon DSLRs have more advanced sensor technology, and Canon lag behind. So we can expect a bit of strife on Dpreview, as system fans slug it out.

@Richard Butler

I think it's just the way system fans interpret reviews, rather than the way these features were highlighted in Dpreview. Because this aspect was given such prominence, I think fans weren't really reading the rest of the reviews.

Personally I'm not into my system is better than your system arguments as I'm more interested in taking photos, and just see cameras as tools with a range of pluses and minuses. But as you're probably well aware, if the 1DX mkII has better DR than the D5, and I think it is certain as the 80D seems to have the edge over the D5 at lower ISOs, the Canon fans will probably respond with glee. So expect a rocky ride over the next few months as system fans slug it out.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2016 at 21:52 UTC

Just an observation. I think to an extent this situation has been set up by Dpreview highlighting ISO invariance and DR as something which was lagging behind on Canon, and where Sony and Nikon were ahead of the curve. In other words the implication was that Nikon DSLRs were better because of the generally better DR of their sensors. Whereas of course better has always been a relative term, and there is much more to a camera and a system than just this particular test.

Now that Canon DSLRs are starting to apparently use a new generation of sensors with on sensor ADC, this scenario is no longer so clear. It is almost certain that the new Canon 1DX mkII will perform much better on Dpreviews DR and ISO invariance tests, than the D5. This will obviously upset the meme that Nikon DSLRs have more advanced sensor technology, and Canon lag behind. So we can expect a bit of strife on Dpreview, as system fans slug it out.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2016 at 14:20 UTC as 65th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

sandy b: A couple of Notes. Worst NIKON. Better than the 6D, which is considered in Canon land a very good camera indeed. Probably as good or better then ANY Canon, up to this year. For a sports/Photojournalist camera that may be the best in the world at what it does.
This is a conscious decision by Nikon based on who buys this camera. Not by those who would never buy this camera for any reason, much less a Nikon, and who wouldn't know how to expose or push a shadow if it hit them in the face.
And considering that Nikon sells 4 other cameras that are in the top 5 of DR, a D5 owner probably has that covered. But then most of you complaining the loudest probably don't even have a camera as good as Nikon DR.

I'm not getting in any Nikon bashing because I don't believe in fanboyism, and I've got every respect for the Nikon system.

However, keeping the argument on the straight and narrow. When it comes to pushing the shadows at lower ISOs the D5 is marginally better than the 4 years old 6D, which is due for an update, and clearly not as good as the 80D.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2016 at 14:08 UTC
In reply to:

martindpr: Clearly it's optimized for anything above ISO 3200.

By any standards this isn't a portrait, neither a landscape camera.

It's made strictly for photojournalism and sports and nothing else.

For versatility, I would buy a D4s since they'll be on sale.

16MP is enough.

"By any standards this isn't a portrait, neither a landscape camera.

It's made strictly for photojournalism and sports and nothing else. "

Not really. This class of DSLR is also used by wildlife and nature photographers, for who it does matter being able to bring out shadow detail at lower ISOs. Okay this isn't a killer limitation, as is shown by how many wildlife photographers used the 1DX and previous Canon pro DSLRS. But it isn't just news shooters and sports photographers as claimed.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2016 at 14:03 UTC

Whilst I'm a Canon user I'm not a fanboy and respect Nikon. I don't see either system as simplistically better, each has advantages and disadvantages.

I compared the Nikon D5 to the Canon 6D at +5EV, and they are surprisingly similar - the D5 is just a tad better with a touch less colour noise. Whereas the Canon 1DX mkII is reputed to have much improved DR. It seems to have the same new generation type sensor as the 80D, which has been proven to have much better DR. So it looks like surprisingly Canon's 1DX mkII will likely outperform the D5 in this aspect.

I'm one of those people who would like more DR with Canon sensors, and I'm bending towards a Canon 80D now, even though my plans had been to get a Canon 7D mkII in the next few months. The 80D clearly has better DR, but the 7D mkII is a bit better at high ISOs.

Overall, I think this is going to matter more for wildlife and nature photographers, where recovering shadow detail at lower ISOs matters more.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2016 at 08:40 UTC as 110th comment
In reply to:

SteB: Thanks for Dpreview for putting this up, and it pretty much confirmed what I expected, which is all very welcome. In other words Canon are switching to some form of on sensor ADC, and it provides very welcome shadow lifting ability at lower ISOs.

I think those nitpicking need to put this into perspective. Sure it's still about just over a stop behind the D7200, but it's much better than previous Canon sensors. What's more if you knew your camera's limitations, and all have them, Canon DSLRs were excellent photographic tools. I was already very pleased with my 70D. If you couldn't get great images with the 70D it's your technique and skills you need to address, not get a new camera.

A camera system is more than just the best possible sensor. Like lots of photographers I've considered other systems. Nikon is a very accomplished system, but the lenses I'm most interested in are better on the Canon side, and what's more the live view implementation with EFCS is much better on Canon.

@Al wants a bagel

You are misrepresenting what I said. I clearly said that an increase in dynamic range and shadow pushing ability would be useful, to me. However, at the same time dynamic range is just one of many features useful in photography.

An experienced photographer works within the limitations of the tools they use because they understand them. Many of the world's top photographers use Canon cameras and produce outstanding images. Although this isn't because they took them with Canon cameras, it's because they are good photographers who know what they are doing.

Saying one camera is better than the other is a game for gadget enthusiasts, and brand fanboys, not photographers.

You called me "juvenile", which was not only offensive, but ironically juvenile. So I called you out and said let's see your outstanding photography in which your equipment is limiting you. I was merely illustrating that I use my cameras as a tool to produce photographs.

Link | Posted on Mar 23, 2016 at 08:42 UTC
In reply to:

SteB: Thanks for Dpreview for putting this up, and it pretty much confirmed what I expected, which is all very welcome. In other words Canon are switching to some form of on sensor ADC, and it provides very welcome shadow lifting ability at lower ISOs.

I think those nitpicking need to put this into perspective. Sure it's still about just over a stop behind the D7200, but it's much better than previous Canon sensors. What's more if you knew your camera's limitations, and all have them, Canon DSLRs were excellent photographic tools. I was already very pleased with my 70D. If you couldn't get great images with the 70D it's your technique and skills you need to address, not get a new camera.

A camera system is more than just the best possible sensor. Like lots of photographers I've considered other systems. Nikon is a very accomplished system, but the lenses I'm most interested in are better on the Canon side, and what's more the live view implementation with EFCS is much better on Canon.

@Al wants a bagel

Do you actually take photographs of a quality where the equipment makes a difference? I can't find any in your profile or any links to them.

You see I use my photographic equipment for taking photographs. Most people think my processing is pretty good. The question is do you have any experience of taking or processing good photographs, where your equipment is a big limit to what can you achieve?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/steb1/

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2016 at 18:11 UTC
In reply to:

SteB: Thanks for Dpreview for putting this up, and it pretty much confirmed what I expected, which is all very welcome. In other words Canon are switching to some form of on sensor ADC, and it provides very welcome shadow lifting ability at lower ISOs.

I think those nitpicking need to put this into perspective. Sure it's still about just over a stop behind the D7200, but it's much better than previous Canon sensors. What's more if you knew your camera's limitations, and all have them, Canon DSLRs were excellent photographic tools. I was already very pleased with my 70D. If you couldn't get great images with the 70D it's your technique and skills you need to address, not get a new camera.

A camera system is more than just the best possible sensor. Like lots of photographers I've considered other systems. Nikon is a very accomplished system, but the lenses I'm most interested in are better on the Canon side, and what's more the live view implementation with EFCS is much better on Canon.

A camera or photography is not just about pushing shadow detail. Plus I've got Topaz DeNoise to deal with shadow detail.

I'm amazed that you think no one would consider the 7D mkII now, and it makes me wonder how much photographic experience you have, or if you just like discussing the pros and cons of different cameras.

Out of interest, I'm still considering getting a 7D mkII.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2016 at 17:06 UTC

Thanks for Dpreview for putting this up, and it pretty much confirmed what I expected, which is all very welcome. In other words Canon are switching to some form of on sensor ADC, and it provides very welcome shadow lifting ability at lower ISOs.

I think those nitpicking need to put this into perspective. Sure it's still about just over a stop behind the D7200, but it's much better than previous Canon sensors. What's more if you knew your camera's limitations, and all have them, Canon DSLRs were excellent photographic tools. I was already very pleased with my 70D. If you couldn't get great images with the 70D it's your technique and skills you need to address, not get a new camera.

A camera system is more than just the best possible sensor. Like lots of photographers I've considered other systems. Nikon is a very accomplished system, but the lenses I'm most interested in are better on the Canon side, and what's more the live view implementation with EFCS is much better on Canon.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2016 at 16:40 UTC as 64th comment | 16 replies
In reply to:

_sem_: An interesting review of a peculiar lens.
It would be nice to see a macro (or closeup) comparison with a workaround - a wideangle prime on a short extension tube. I hear certain Canon wideangles do reach 1:1 on extension.

One option which would work on FF Canon DSLRs is the EF-S 24mm f2.8 STM on extension tubes. Whilst an EF-S lens, so it wouldn't directly mount to a FF camera, it would mount via extension tubes. A 12mm extension tube will start at 1/2 life size. With an extension tube it should cover FF without vignetting.

I haven't tried it on a FF body because I don't have one, but with a 20mm extension tube on a 1.6x crop body it will get over life size (it does nearly 1/3 life-size natively), with a reasonable working distance. Whilst only being about 38mm in FF terms on a crop body, it's still wide-angle if not massively so. I'm going to be using it this year for macro. If I can I think I'll also get a Tokina 10-17mm fisheye zoom, but I've got quite a bit of other equipment on my shopping list this year so it's a matter of priorities.

The great thing about the EF-S 24mm f2.8 STM is that it's got great image quality, and it's a pancake design, so there's more working distance.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2016 at 09:40 UTC
On article Newly enthused: hands on with the Canon EOS 80D (706 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joseph Black: I believe this and the 1D X II reveal what Canon has been working hard to accomplish over the last few years. They've been working on getting their sensors with DP PDAF to the next generation of functionality, and it's going to start really paying off. The 7DII was five years in the making, probably exactly because they wanted the first generation DP PDAF sensor onboard rather than releasing several half-baked versions, which would lead to accusations of holding back tech and trying to milk consumers. The 80D with a new, faster nano-USM lens gives us a hint at what's to come. I think the 7DIII with dual Digic7 will be astounding, building on what appears to be a very competent 80D...only time will tell.
Sure, not every camera will have everything people want, but if 4K is all people can grasp onto now rather than the continuous "Canon must have shut down its R&D" then thank goodness. Keep beating that 4K drum and blame the camera for being a terrible photographer.

@RedFox88

Clearly you don't understand what I meant. Various components like the mirrobox assembly, shutter etc, are re-designed as technology moves on. But a camera like the 7D mkII is probably technologically up with the rest. I mean it has the latest mirror type etc.

If you think that hardware components can't be used modularly, it's you that doesn't understand product design. Many digicams, even from the big manufacturers, often share far more than sensors. Even lens units.

Link | Posted on Feb 19, 2016 at 17:58 UTC
On article Newly enthused: hands on with the Canon EOS 80D (706 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joseph Black: I believe this and the 1D X II reveal what Canon has been working hard to accomplish over the last few years. They've been working on getting their sensors with DP PDAF to the next generation of functionality, and it's going to start really paying off. The 7DII was five years in the making, probably exactly because they wanted the first generation DP PDAF sensor onboard rather than releasing several half-baked versions, which would lead to accusations of holding back tech and trying to milk consumers. The 80D with a new, faster nano-USM lens gives us a hint at what's to come. I think the 7DIII with dual Digic7 will be astounding, building on what appears to be a very competent 80D...only time will tell.
Sure, not every camera will have everything people want, but if 4K is all people can grasp onto now rather than the continuous "Canon must have shut down its R&D" then thank goodness. Keep beating that 4K drum and blame the camera for being a terrible photographer.

If Canon is actually starting to produce new sensors with on sensor A/D conversion we may see a 7D mkIII earlier than expected. Especially with the forthcoming Nikon D500 raising the bar.

I don't have a crystal ball or know how Canon will handle it. But once some DSLRs start to appear with newer sensor tech, it will leave those with older sensor tech a bit out on a limb. It may not take too much R&D to update models with some of the new technology, without having to do a major redesign.

In other words, a 7D mkII upgrade could be given a new sensor, bigger buffer, CFast 2.0 card slot, faster processors, higher resolution LCD, AF upgrade etc, without a major redesign of the camera.

Link | Posted on Feb 19, 2016 at 16:40 UTC
On article Newly enthused: hands on with the Canon EOS 80D (706 comments in total)
In reply to:

krectus: Pretty shocked that a DSLR released in 2016 can't shoot 4k. Especially a camera aimed at videographers (with it's own special video zooming device!). Surely Canon, who seems to need to be dragged kicking and screaming into the 4K world has a reason to not do this. The camera is capable, it's a big selling feature if they did? Why?! Why wouldn't they do this!?! It's 2016. Every smartphone released this year can do it. It really bothers me, I can't figure this out.

@Lawrencew

"what puts it into perspective is that MILCs less than the price of an 80D can do it.
Why is it so more difficult to provide 4K in a DSLR?"

Yes this is true, but only up to a point. Indeed mirrorless cameras do have advantages, especially as videocentric cameras. The first mirrorless camera that had internal 4K recording was the Panasonic GH4, which is still the top of the range Panasonic camera i.e. it hasn't been superseded. Some of the lower spec Panasonic cameras have been given it. But the GH4 was originally more expensive than the 80D will be, and even though it's price has lowered, it is still close to the 80D pre-order price, which will quickly drop.

In other words it is in reality only recently that 4k has been available on affordable ILCs of any type. SLRs are more expensive to manufacture, and manufacturers of mirrorless cameras are adding features hard to try and draw those away from DSLRs. The cheapest DSLR announced with 4k is nearly twice the 80D price.

Link | Posted on Feb 19, 2016 at 16:26 UTC
On article Newly enthused: hands on with the Canon EOS 80D (706 comments in total)
In reply to:

krectus: Pretty shocked that a DSLR released in 2016 can't shoot 4k. Especially a camera aimed at videographers (with it's own special video zooming device!). Surely Canon, who seems to need to be dragged kicking and screaming into the 4K world has a reason to not do this. The camera is capable, it's a big selling feature if they did? Why?! Why wouldn't they do this!?! It's 2016. Every smartphone released this year can do it. It really bothers me, I can't figure this out.

@Richard Butler, thanks for the reminder about the facts. Which puts all the other nonsense below the line here into perspective. Of the DSLRs you mention, 3 are not even shipping yet, and the other was a super expensive camera aimed at cinematographers. Also the 3 that do have 4k, but are not yet available are all high end pro-models. Even the D500 is a level about the 80D and nearly twice the price. This puts all the trolling about the lack of 4k into perspective.

Link | Posted on Feb 19, 2016 at 13:17 UTC
On article Newly enthused: hands on with the Canon EOS 80D (706 comments in total)
In reply to:

Armin Katouzian: Canon 80D vs Nikon 7200!
which one is better to portrait & Image quality and weather extreme sealed?

They will both probably be excellent cameras, which won't limit any capable photographer. The D7200 is a known quantity, and no one knows how the 80D performs yet. But we can expect to be better on every level as regards functionality and performance to the 70D, which I own. The 70D is an excellent camera, and is not limiting in anyway to a capable photographer.

This level of camera is already at such a level, that the limiting factor is nearly always the photographer and not the equipment. What I mean by this, is that unless you have very specialist needs or demands, or you are an incredibly talented photographer, you needn't worry about either camera limiting your photography.

Link | Posted on Feb 19, 2016 at 13:08 UTC
On article Newly enthused: hands on with the Canon EOS 80D (706 comments in total)
In reply to:

SteB: I think the big question is whether the 80D with have new sensor tech with on sensor A/D conversion. My feeling is that Canon won't want to make too much of this until all their models have upgraded sensor tech. We know new sensor tech with sensor A/D conversion is coming, because a Canon executive said in an interview a few months back that all future Canon sensors would have sensor A/D conversion. Absolutely the only question is which DSLRs first get it.

I and I suspect many other Canon users will be waiting to see the first RAW files from the 80D which become available.

Even aside from this the Canon 80D looks a good upgrade. I particularly like the 27 AF points being available at f8. It makes it a bit difficult for me as I was just about to get a 7D mkII in the next month or so. That's now on hold until after the 80D tests and user feedback on it.

Yes, I'm aware that it is looking very much like new sensor tech. As the new sensor tech we know Canon are intending to implement on all their sensors some time in the future, is on board A/D conversion, it is looking like what it is. It just needs some confirmation.

What's quite funny though is how Canon have said very little or nothing about it being an entirely new sensor. Yet in the past they insisteed that virtually every new DSLR has had a new sensor, even when it was just something very minor, and in reality both the specs and performance were the same.

So in an odd way Canon are confirming it by not saying anything at all about the sensor. You can understand Canon's thinking. If they said it had an incredible new sensor, much better than the one in the 70D (which I have), they'd be more or less saying it was a lot better than the sensor in the 7D mkII. But whatever, we'll soon know when DPR and others get the RAW files and push them more than a couple of stops at base ISO.

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2016 at 17:41 UTC
On article Newly enthused: hands on with the Canon EOS 80D (706 comments in total)

I think the big question is whether the 80D with have new sensor tech with on sensor A/D conversion. My feeling is that Canon won't want to make too much of this until all their models have upgraded sensor tech. We know new sensor tech with sensor A/D conversion is coming, because a Canon executive said in an interview a few months back that all future Canon sensors would have sensor A/D conversion. Absolutely the only question is which DSLRs first get it.

I and I suspect many other Canon users will be waiting to see the first RAW files from the 80D which become available.

Even aside from this the Canon 80D looks a good upgrade. I particularly like the 27 AF points being available at f8. It makes it a bit difficult for me as I was just about to get a 7D mkII in the next month or so. That's now on hold until after the 80D tests and user feedback on it.

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2016 at 09:44 UTC as 123rd comment | 2 replies

Does anyone know if this will provide the same type of AF for say Canon lenses, via an adapter like that from Metabones, such as on the A7r II?

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2016 at 21:22 UTC as 193rd comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

SteB: "Full Frame". Maybe we can go back to calling the 24mm x 36mm "minature format" as it used to be called in the old film days.

@vcsd

I'm not sure who's comment or what point you are responding to. However you must appreciate that if you are regularly cropping FF to APS-C size or less, which is common in bird photography, the FF camera has no high ISO advantage. In effect you are just using an APS-C sensor or less. If the pixel density on a FF camera when cropped to APS-C size, has the same pixel density as the APS-C sensor, the high ISO noise performance will be the same or worse than the APS-C sensor.

The high ISO advantage of FF is only there if the image is not cropped and the whole sensor image is being used.

An APS-C sensored camera like the 7D mkII, or even the 70D will still have an advantage over the 5DS, because they have a higher frame rate, and bigger buffers on the 7D mk II. This is why no sensor format is inherently better than others, and it is always a compromise of what is best for the job. It's always advantages and disadvantages, depending on what your purpose for the tool (camera) is.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 10:05 UTC
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