JimW-203

JimW-203

Lives in United States Tarpon Springs, FL, United States
Works as a Retired
Joined on Jun 4, 2011
About me:

I have been doing photography since the early 50s while in school and later traveling the world in a variety of positions in the government and private industry. Moved from Boston to Florida in 1988; first, St. Petersburg then Orlando, and now, Tarpon Springs.

Comments

Total: 274, showing: 41 – 60
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On challenge Architectural Detail - Steel or other metal (2 comments in total)

My sincere thanks to all the entrants for their contribution of such wonderful images.

Link | Posted on Dec 4, 2015 at 04:02 UTC as 1st comment
On photo Paris - Eiffel Tower in the Architectural Detail - Steel or other metal challenge (1 comment in total)

This image clearly deserves a prominent place on this challenge's podium; thank you for entering it.

Link | Posted on Dec 4, 2015 at 04:00 UTC as 1st comment
On photo IMG_5850_2 in the Architectural Detail - Steel or other metal challenge (1 comment in total)

Thank you for posting this wonderful image - it met the challenge's demands beautifully.

Link | Posted on Dec 4, 2015 at 03:57 UTC as 1st comment
On photo Railing at Rockefeller Center in the Architectural Detail - Steel or other metal challenge (2 comments in total)

Congratulations on your outstanding image. You captured brilliantly the sense and spirit of the challenge - truly well deserved. Thank you for your contribution.

Link | Posted on Dec 4, 2015 at 03:56 UTC as 2nd comment
On photo END OF THE LINE DP in the War challenge (8 comments in total)

A remarkable picture. The only shame is that two voters ignored the beautiful image and gave it a 0.5 & 1.0. You should be proud of your part in telling the story.

Link | Posted on Nov 29, 2015 at 04:06 UTC as 5th comment
In reply to:

JimW-203: Query:

If one wanted to use this feature to do a quick (relatively) and dirty focus stacking for macro, does it seem logical/possible through the LR path?

Hypothetically, as I understand the feature, the process would be:
1) take the shot and then
2) use LR to establish up to 30 jpegs, each with a different point of focus.
3) stack the 30 shots in PS or other appropriate editing software
4) edit, enhance, etc. the result as needed/desired

Considerations I might consider adding in the process would be:
1) convert the first output (the 30 frames) to TIFF or other lossless format before the stacking and editing phase in order to minimize damage to the final output
2) as with all macro, plan the shot in advance and use a tripod
3) select the frames to be used with care - using all 30 might not add enough to make the processing time and overhead worth it.

Does this seem either doable or desirable? Comments, please.

I can understand concerns about "focus breathing" with some lenses. However, and correct me if I am wrong, the actual physical distance that the shift will have to cover in most macro applications will be quite small and the resultant shift trivial. I expect this will be obviated because much of the resultant out of focus elements will be tossed away and replaced by in focus elements when all the frames are merged in the stacking process. I still use the same macro lens (Micro Nikkor 55mm f3.5) I started with in the 70's for most of the intervening time and have never found any significant problems even after I started focus stacking with software. (prior to that focus stacking from film to paper was largely unheard of)
Even with the addition of the Micro Nikkor 105mm f2.8 and the f2.8 version of the 55mm, I have yet to find problems. This may well be because of the design of the lens or because the span of change in focus points, I don't know - it just has not been a concern.

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2015 at 21:21 UTC

Query:

If one wanted to use this feature to do a quick (relatively) and dirty focus stacking for macro, does it seem logical/possible through the LR path?

Hypothetically, as I understand the feature, the process would be:
1) take the shot and then
2) use LR to establish up to 30 jpegs, each with a different point of focus.
3) stack the 30 shots in PS or other appropriate editing software
4) edit, enhance, etc. the result as needed/desired

Considerations I might consider adding in the process would be:
1) convert the first output (the 30 frames) to TIFF or other lossless format before the stacking and editing phase in order to minimize damage to the final output
2) as with all macro, plan the shot in advance and use a tripod
3) select the frames to be used with care - using all 30 might not add enough to make the processing time and overhead worth it.

Does this seem either doable or desirable? Comments, please.

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2015 at 19:16 UTC as 44th comment | 3 replies
On challenge Architectural Detail - Steel or other metal (2 comments in total)

This challenge has filled quickly with many outstanding submissions. Consequently, I have decided to open it up to more submissions.

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2015 at 23:53 UTC as 2nd comment

The arrogance of Reuters is astounding! How dare the customer tell me, the great artist, what they will pay for? My new policy: henceforth, I will no longer accept payment from any customer who dares to specify what they want; they will take what I allow them to have and will do so with a deep bow of subservience.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 20:39 UTC as 22nd comment | 4 replies
On photo surfing in the Balance challenge (6 comments in total)

My choice for the top - brings us into a new world where the exuberance of youth and the power of a young imagination allows us to fly over the waves with her. Thank you for having seen it and shared it.

Link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 00:09 UTC as 2nd comment | 1 reply
On photo Old Rose in the Macro - Decaying in Nature challenge (4 comments in total)

You prove, with this gorgeous image, that there is much value in older optics when married with newer technology. The skill, knowledge and sensitivity that went into the design and production of lenses still shows merit. The 55 3.5 Micro Nikkor is a tool that can still yield outstanding images in the hands of skilled and sensitive photographers - well done!

Link | Posted on Nov 11, 2015 at 03:02 UTC as 3rd comment
On photo DREAK in the Dismal challenge (1 comment in total)

Don't quite know what "DREAK" means.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2015 at 00:44 UTC as 1st comment
On article 2015 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras around $500 (275 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joe Ogiba: Why would anyone want to shoot a 4K video @15fps on the Nikon 1 J5 ?

Cameron2>
Where did you see the GF7 at Costco? I do not find it online nor in my local Costco (Clearwater FL).

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2015 at 21:45 UTC
On photo Steel Spiral in B&W in the Macro - What it Use to Be challenge (3 comments in total)

When our new dock was being wired the electrical switch boxes were drilled and reamed for conduit - this is what came out, leaving the hole behind. The result is much like the shavings from a pencil sharpener, just in reverse.

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2015 at 03:39 UTC as 2nd comment
On photo 2531170_112219452521_2 in the Black & White Photo of the Week #3 challenge (5 comments in total)

What I find amazing is that the photographer got a child to remain still for a whole second.

Link | Posted on Nov 3, 2015 at 04:54 UTC as 1st comment
On challenge Balance (7 comments in total)

This seems to be quite popular; it has filled up so quickly, would you consider extending its limit to something like 75? Have pity and give us slow oldsters a chance to get up to speed.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2015 at 21:59 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply

Many of the photos designated as having RAW files attached only have XMP files, not RW2. Of those with RW2 are very clean, notably lacking the atmospheric haze I have come to expect from samples shot of landscapes in areas like Seattle. I noticed the WB on the RAW of the wave crashing over rocks showed 4800K - did that reflect an auto WB setting? With care one could coax quite acceptable shadow detail out of the rocks without destroying midrange detail. Based on these photos, one might find this camera to be a capable and genial travel companion to have along on trips.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2015 at 19:47 UTC as 21st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

NZ Scott: Cool photo!

Given that Dpreview is primarily a gear site, it seems odd that this story does not mention the photographer's camera gear. Personally, I would like to have known what he was using.

I suspect that the photographer used a non-Sony camera/lens combination, and Dpreview has deliberately kept the brand out of the story to pander to Sony's wishes.

This is not good journalism.

One should not confuse journalism with PR. First off, the portion detailing the shot was written by the photographer - I suspect, in support of the press release from Sony outlining the results of the competition. Secondly, the portion (the lead paragraph) from DPreview, reports only the information provided by the photographer and Sony. Sony is unlikely to issue a press release extolling the virtues of a competing manufacturer's products. What evidence can you provide that definitively points to the gear actually used to take the picture? The gear listed in his profile is not enough; he may even had borrowed the camera or lens he used - we just don't know for certain.

Link | Posted on Sep 5, 2015 at 02:23 UTC
In reply to:

kapeed1: As razormac and watson076 have also observed, why is the end of the leaf stem totally flat and trim as if cut with a knife. Was the leaf given to the Orangutan by a human? Or is it that the orangutan just happened to find a leaf stem that was left over by another human neatly cut? I doubt the orangutan would have fashioned a pen knife out of stone and kept it handy - that is a stretch (no offense rfsIII). Just curious, how the leaf reached the orangutan. Kudos to a great photo regardless!

Is it possible the taro leaf is a food source for some of the animals in the park? If so, it may have been a happy accident that the proximity of the leaf and the intelligence of the orangutan combined to provide an ad hoc shelter when needed. Regardless of how the leaf got there - either as food or simply as detritus of the vegetation - it is a remarkably charming photo and provides an insight into the needs and capabilities of a young animal.

Link | Posted on Sep 4, 2015 at 22:01 UTC
On article The new Canon 35mm F1.4L II will be a thing of beauty (230 comments in total)
In reply to:

acidic: It's a pro lens people, so it will be undoubtedly be purchased by CPS members who need such a lens.

But, to a larger extent, it will be purchased by rich people who keep their high end Canon bodies set to the 'green square' mode. Why? Because the salesperson told them that this lens is essential for high quality photography.

My theory is if one wants their favorite gear maker to remain in business and continue to be encouraged to improve their offerings, welcome all who choose to join. Their money pays for improvement as much as anyone's; just enjoy what they help to be produced (even if a few use what has been characterized as the "dummy" mode - after all, it's their camera).

Link | Posted on Sep 1, 2015 at 07:02 UTC
Total: 274, showing: 41 – 60
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