PerpetuumMobile

PerpetuumMobile

Joined on Nov 26, 2011

Comments

Total: 6, showing: 1 – 6

2 Questions:

1. Can you follow fast moving targets (electronic delay)?
2. What about durability? OLEDs are not made to last forever...
...when will visible degradation occur?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 6, 2011 at 16:59 UTC as 4th comment | 2 replies
On Fujifilm releases X-S1 premium EXR 26X superzoom article (383 comments in total)
In reply to:

PerpetuumMobile: The diffraction limited aperture (2/3 sensor @ 12MP) is ~4.3. That makes maximum zoom (aperture 5.6) useless (all settings with aperture higher that ~4.3!!!); you won't get any additional information in the image! (in real life, results will be worse than this theoretical limit!)

Would have been better to make the camera lighter/smaller while obeying the laws of physics!

I doubt that jcmarfilph is interested in a sophisticated answer and I doubt that he even knows what diffraction actually is but if you want to get a little bit smarter type this into google: 'MTF' and 'slanted edge'. After you have thought out what that is an what it means: do the test again (do not forget to set up a reproducible environment and do some statistics)

OR: just be happy with your magic 'physics f......' camera! :)

Direct link | Posted on Nov 29, 2011 at 20:26 UTC
On Fujifilm releases X-S1 premium EXR 26X superzoom article (383 comments in total)
In reply to:

PerpetuumMobile: The diffraction limited aperture (2/3 sensor @ 12MP) is ~4.3. That makes maximum zoom (aperture 5.6) useless (all settings with aperture higher that ~4.3!!!); you won't get any additional information in the image! (in real life, results will be worse than this theoretical limit!)

Would have been better to make the camera lighter/smaller while obeying the laws of physics!

I like to talk 'black and white'! ;)

Of course the image (max zoom, and at 5.6 aperture) is not useless, but if you take the picture at lower zoom and lower aperture, you'll get the same information (quality) in the image.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2011 at 08:58 UTC
On Fujifilm releases X-S1 premium EXR 26X superzoom article (383 comments in total)
In reply to:

PerpetuumMobile: The diffraction limited aperture (2/3 sensor @ 12MP) is ~4.3. That makes maximum zoom (aperture 5.6) useless (all settings with aperture higher that ~4.3!!!); you won't get any additional information in the image! (in real life, results will be worse than this theoretical limit!)

Would have been better to make the camera lighter/smaller while obeying the laws of physics!

It's physics! Try it! Just take a picture with a (compact) camera at a moderate magnification and low aperture (e.g. 4) and the take another picture with twice the magnification but relatively high aperture (e.g. 8 or more). Then magnify the first picture by the factor 2 and compare the results. Despite using more 'zoom' you will not have more information in the picture! If you use even higher apertures the picture will be worse than the magnified one!

But here:
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/digital-camera-sensor-size.htm
it is explained far better!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 26, 2011 at 22:38 UTC
On Fujifilm releases X-S1 premium EXR 26X superzoom article (383 comments in total)
In reply to:

PerpetuumMobile: The diffraction limited aperture (2/3 sensor @ 12MP) is ~4.3. That makes maximum zoom (aperture 5.6) useless (all settings with aperture higher that ~4.3!!!); you won't get any additional information in the image! (in real life, results will be worse than this theoretical limit!)

Would have been better to make the camera lighter/smaller while obeying the laws of physics!

My english could be better! When I say 'diffraction limited aperture' I mean the aperture 'before the diffraction airy disk becomes larger than the circle of confusion' (...that's just quoted! ;)

read the full text here: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/digital-camera-sensor-size.htm

Direct link | Posted on Nov 26, 2011 at 21:22 UTC
On Fujifilm releases X-S1 premium EXR 26X superzoom article (383 comments in total)

The diffraction limited aperture (2/3 sensor @ 12MP) is ~4.3. That makes maximum zoom (aperture 5.6) useless (all settings with aperture higher that ~4.3!!!); you won't get any additional information in the image! (in real life, results will be worse than this theoretical limit!)

Would have been better to make the camera lighter/smaller while obeying the laws of physics!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 26, 2011 at 11:52 UTC as 44th comment | 13 replies
Total: 6, showing: 1 – 6