BJN

BJN

Lives in United States Salt Lake City USA, UT, United States
Works as a Graphic design
Joined on Apr 30, 2001

Comments

Total: 293, showing: 1 – 20
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On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 First Impressions Review preview (832 comments in total)
In reply to:

okaysee: "Thus, the effective sensor area on the LX100 is really 1.5X larger than 1inch" that's from the Introduction of the LX100 preview, 3rd paragraph down.

Um, that doesn't sound right at all. 1.5X larger than a 1-inch sensor would be 1.5". The LX100 DOES NOT use a 1.5" sensor. It uses a 4/3" sensor which measures 1.333". The EFFECTIVE amount of the sensor the LX100 uses out of the 1.333" available is 1.0667". The effective sensor size is therefore 1.0667X larger than a 1" sensor, not 1.5X larger.

Jeff Keller, I hope that helps.

As cpceter points out kindly, that's a 1-inch type sensor...not a 1" sensor, Susan!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 17, 2014 at 04:48 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 First Impressions Review preview (832 comments in total)

I hope that multifunction switch is better than the GM1's. Panasonic could improve it by requiring a firmer press on the rotary ring to actuate the button function.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 17, 2014 at 04:44 UTC as 12th comment
On Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 article (165 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peiasdf: DMC-LX100 is lot better at this point. Way faster lenses.

Lenses? Does a fixed zoom count as more than one lens to you?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 16, 2014 at 03:18 UTC
On Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 article (165 comments in total)
In reply to:

Hen3ry: Not interested. No built-in flash.

What's better, a tiny, weak, delicate built-in flash like the one I don't use in my GM1 or a hotshoe that gives you the ability to use a decent flash that's actually worth firing up?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 16, 2014 at 03:13 UTC
On Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 article (165 comments in total)
In reply to:

BJN: I will get one of these and be very, very careful with it. Sweet but delicate cameras.

I speak from experience. The magnesium chassis on my first GM1 cracked from a 12"-18" rolling fall. The shutter curtain jumped track and the kit lens wont' focus at the 32mm end of its range. There's not much magnesium to take a "beating". Don't even think of giving this camera a harsh scolding, let alone a beating.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 16, 2014 at 03:10 UTC
On Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 article (165 comments in total)

I will get one of these and be very, very careful with it. Sweet but delicate cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 15, 2014 at 19:30 UTC as 24th comment | 3 replies
On Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 article (165 comments in total)
In reply to:

JBurnett: Yay, EVF! I know young'uns often don't care, but we who need reading glasses to properly see the LCD applaud this addition.

Yohan, it's not one or the other...having both options definitely lets you frame better under bright daylight and viewfinder shooting is more stable.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 15, 2014 at 19:27 UTC
On Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 article (165 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: Is the LX100 going to eat the GM5's lunch?

Not if you love working with a lens system. And there will be image quality compromises apparent in LX100 images to get that fast glass even with the smaller functional sensor area. So hold judgement until there are image samples...

Direct link | Posted on Sep 15, 2014 at 19:22 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 First Impressions Review preview (832 comments in total)

Looks like a sweet little camera. It's likely to be more delicate than its predecessors. There's a lot going on in a tiny chassis with little left to absorb shock before damaging delicate internals.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 15, 2014 at 19:13 UTC as 116th comment | 1 reply
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 First Impressions Review preview (832 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: The LX100 is brilliant. Panasonic advertises it as a 4/3s sensor when it really isn’t that big because of the multi-aspect ratio. It is actually a 2.2x crop factor instead of 2x. While this means that you lose a little depth of field control when compared to m4/3s, it also means you can make the lens a little smaller.

No wonder they could make that bright of a lens so small. The sensor in this camera isn’t as big as they want you to believe. However, the real key to the performance of the LX100 is that it is only 13 effective megapixels instead of the 20+ that Sony crams onto their 1 inch sensor.

The LX100 is pure genius.

That bit of depth of field control difference is functionally inconsequential. They can also make these lenses small because the real optical performance is hidden by the image processing that corrects all manner of optical design horrors. I'll be interested to see image samples to evaluate the net result.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 15, 2014 at 18:51 UTC
On Sigma announces dp1 Quattro article (199 comments in total)
In reply to:

EssexAsh: good to see some real innovation from a brand.

Weirdness doesn't qualify as innovation.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2014 at 04:19 UTC
On Sigma announces dp1 Quattro article (199 comments in total)
In reply to:

KameraFever: I love the imagge quality coming from these cameras.BUT...

After reading about the terrible handling and performance combine with the lack of raw support I will pass. I can even deal with the iso limitation. I just wish the foveon tech would get liscenced to a compamy capable of creating a good handling camera like canon, nikon, olympus, or fujifilm.

It's like you see the potential for an amazing landscape camera, but it then gets put together like Frankenstien. Can someone please make a great landscape foveon camera? I pray.

Don't forget the horrible and snail-like software.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2014 at 04:17 UTC
On Sigma announces dp1 Quattro article (199 comments in total)
In reply to:

phazelag: It seems you either get these cameras or you don't. I finally dipped my toe in the DP waters with a DP3 Merrill and I love it. The images are worth it and the shooting experience is pure photography. I want this series. I will get all three eventually.

It's all find and dandy to appreciate the very limited range of excellent Foveon (the One True Sensor) performance, but lousy, outdated camera design with it's hair-shirt user experience is not "pure photography", it's a lame throwback to the bad old days.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2014 at 04:14 UTC
On Sigma announces dp1 Quattro article (199 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gazeomon: Instead of designing a proper monitor or providing an EVF, they come up with this grotesque looking monster loupe which defeats the purpose of a small portable camera. I wonder how the camera handles now with this giant blister attached to it.

It's not really that small. Might as well add an oddball finder...Sigma seems to delight in making cameras only a Foveon fanatic can live with.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2014 at 04:04 UTC
On SanDisk unveils 512GB Extreme Pro card article (160 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: For $800 I will just buy Ten 128 GB off brand cards. I would rather not keep all of my data on one very expensive card.

One fumble finger incident changing cards and that sliver of plastic and silicon is gone forever. The relative risks don't just mean data errors. This is a special purpose card, period.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 11, 2014 at 20:42 UTC
In reply to:

ecube: The "quick release" strap as shown is commonly used in relatively light weight key rings. I would not bet my camera on such design. Moreover, engaging this quick release requires two hands. Having the quick release by the hips is an awkward position that will more likely result in dropping the camera. More likely than not, the user would have to take the strap off their body in order to engage the quick release mechanism, thus defeating the purpose of quick release. Contrary to the claim of "quick draw from hip" into shooting position, the strap would not easily slid around the shoulder, try it with the narrower neck strap and decide for yourself.

The mounting threaded socket on the baseplate of the camera is design for COMPRESSIVE loading. This product advocates tensile loading the baseplate. I wonder if the developer ever consulted with the camera manufacturer on their proposed tensile loading on the baseplate.

I have L Bracket Swiss Arca compatible mounting plate.

If the parts are well designed, they're strong enough. See the Kickstarter image of the fellow doing pull-ups. Slings allow you to quickly bring the camera to action, so there's no reason you have to quick release with it at your hip. I suggest you try a sling, they work well and the strap slides through the mounting lug so the strap doesn't have to move on your shoulder.

Horses for courses. Sling straps work well for some styles of shooting. This is hardly the first adapter that suspends the load from the tripod socket. I also use Arca type plates and L-brackets. I carry cameras and lenses mounted to tripods using plates and I do it with lots of angular load with tripods slung over my shoulder.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 7, 2014 at 00:18 UTC
In reply to:

princewolf: I could never get used to the idea of carrying an expensive camera upside down, may be it's just me...

I vote paranoid.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 7, 2014 at 00:09 UTC
In reply to:

gravee: Can someone explain whats so special about Arca swiss plates? I'm a relative newbie to photography, I have manfrotto plates on all my cameras and tripods but everytime I try to look for a body strap like this they are only compatible with Arca Swiss plates.

Arca plates are a standard and work with a wide variety of clamps and other components. For many cameras, you can get a custom Arca plate that is keyed so it won't twist on the bottom of the camera, and there are brackets that have windows to allow access to batteries, memory cards, and ports. There's more than one Manfrotto plate and they're not compatible with each other or with other brands of equipment. They only work with Manfrotto equipment.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 7, 2014 at 00:04 UTC
In reply to:

Framer: Why does the wrist strap have to be so big?

A piece of 1/8" cord would more than suffice.

For those camera beasts? You must have tough hide.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 6, 2014 at 23:59 UTC
In reply to:

stevens37y: I made something like that for my camcorder. The strap costs about 1.5 EUR/m the alu plate ( 20mm x 4 mm ) is about 6 EUR/m and you need about 100mm for such a device. The alu plate is covered with grey heat shrink tubing. I would not give them a cent.

If your time is worth nothing and you're happy with the look of a cobbled plate and strap, good for you. The asking price doesn't seem out of line if the product is well made and designed.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 5, 2014 at 23:05 UTC
Total: 293, showing: 1 – 20
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