EinsteinsGhost

EinsteinsGhost

Lives in United States Dallas, TX, United States
Joined on Jun 21, 2011

Comments

Total: 570, showing: 41 – 60
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In reply to:

EinsteinsGhost: @Damien (author): Why is there no mention Sony RX100 at all? It is LX100's most direct competition (the article wasted way more space providing irrelevant history lessons).

@mosc,
I'd like to hear from the author, not your assumptions of it, as to why he named only one camera (G1x) while complaining that this segment has been ignored.

But, I do get to correct you as well: G1X was announced in January 2012, and RX100 was announced in June 2012, so count five months, not 15 months. Although, LX100 has been announced 27 months since the RX100, so, may be it has been too long to remember, not having kept up with subsequent releases?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 23:10 UTC
In reply to:

EinsteinsGhost: @Damien (author): Why is there no mention Sony RX100 at all? It is LX100's most direct competition (the article wasted way more space providing irrelevant history lessons).

@Michael_13,
LX100 is as close to RX100 as competition gets: Both are FLC, similar lens specs, both are about compact size and sensor size is similar and sensor performance should be similar.

OTOH, it is ridiculous to assume that GX7 is a more logical competition. There might be a fringe market where people buy GX7 only with its kit zoom but that is not the point of that camera to begin with. It is about flexibility.

@mosc,
Except that the author mentions this: "The introduction of the big sensor compact was a great thing, and the interest around Canon’s almost-APS-C PowerShot G1 X demonstrated the existence of a demand almost all brands seemed to have been ignoring."

May be he is unaware of RX100's existence, which gained prominence as a pocketable camera primarily due to its larger sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 21:33 UTC
In reply to:

EinsteinsGhost: @Damien (author): Why is there no mention Sony RX100 at all? It is LX100's most direct competition (the article wasted way more space providing irrelevant history lessons).

@aandi,

I'm assuming you read this:
"The introduction of the big sensor compact was a great thing, and the interest around Canon’s almost-APS-C PowerShot G1 X demonstrated the existence of a demand almost all brands seemed to have been ignoring."

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 17:55 UTC
In reply to:

ThePhilips: "The longer I look at the Lumix LX100 the more convinced I become that the time hasn’t yet arrived when we no longer need the advanced compact."

You should look even longer at the statistics of how many people never buy a second lens and shoot exclusively with the kit lenses. Dumbfounding.

I personally think that the larger sensor premium compacts (like Sony RX100 and now, Panasonic LX100) will compete primarily with low-end ILCs where camera size plays the key role. But now, we're looking at buying a lens and a body separately (and replacing a cheaper body every 2-3 years or so) than replacing a more expensive Fixed Lens camera, as technology evolves.

ILCs sell for their IQ AND versatility. This is why I don't think the market for GX7 is the same as it would be for LX100. In the short term? May be.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 17:34 UTC
In reply to:

EinsteinsGhost: @Damien (author): Why is there no mention Sony RX100 at all? It is LX100's most direct competition (the article wasted way more space providing irrelevant history lessons).

It would appear that this is about comparing a specific FLC to a specific ILC, but it is also self-evident that half, if not more, of the space is dedicated to a history lesson that has little to no relevance. Did you not see mention of Canon G1X and G1?

And especially if the opinion points at....

"The introduction of the big sensor compact was a great thing, and the interest around Canon’s almost-APS-C PowerShot G1 X demonstrated the existence of a demand almost all brands seemed to have been ignoring. "

Really?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 16:35 UTC
In reply to:

EinsteinsGhost: @Damien (author): Why is there no mention Sony RX100 at all? It is LX100's most direct competition (the article wasted way more space providing irrelevant history lessons).

And teh internets are missing "opinion pieces" on history of fixed lens film cameras that were not FF? May be, this opinion is for those who needed it? In that case, I apologize.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 16:03 UTC
In reply to:

EinsteinsGhost: @Damien (author): Why is there no mention Sony RX100 at all? It is LX100's most direct competition (the article wasted way more space providing irrelevant history lessons).

@mosc, I'm not opposed to it being compared to an ILC from same company and with almost the same sensor size (GX7 sensor is about 20% larger... no direct mention of that either). It is logical to throw in that comparison. However, I'm questioning wasted space and time over something totally irrelevant (a history lesson on APS-c format, and P&S with a write up on a fixed lens camera with m43 sensor). You might have seen this:
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonic-lumix-dmc-fz1000/images/apertures.png

A few might consider an FLC as logical replacement for an ILC, which might work fine if you keep it long enough, but a typical ILC buyer buys body, replaces it, keeps lenses. With an FLC, you simply replace both. More buyers make the decision to go FLC for portability/convenience and if one lens can do it all.

In terms of sensor size and camera size, LX100 actually sits between RX100 trio and GX7. It also has similarly spec'd zoom lens as RX100 MkIII.

Camera Size: RX100 III vs LX100.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 15:46 UTC

@Damien (author): Why is there no mention Sony RX100 at all? It is LX100's most direct competition (the article wasted way more space providing irrelevant history lessons).

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 14:29 UTC as 77th comment | 15 replies
In reply to:

EinsteinsGhost: The author has downplayed the compromise in sensor size (the crop factor increases from 2x to 2.2x compared to 35mm format) and only highlighted difference in resolutions as if all else is unchanged.

With reduced sensor size, LX100 actually competes as much with Sony RX100.

The RX100 III is closer in sensor size and lens specs, although significantly smaller.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 14:27 UTC
In reply to:

mosava: I bought aSony A6000...

I would as well. Unless I wanted a pocketable camera, then RX100 III (which the LX100 appears to follow).

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 14:22 UTC

The author has downplayed the compromise in sensor size (the crop factor increases from 2x to 2.2x compared to 35mm format) and only highlighted difference in resolutions as if all else is unchanged.

With reduced sensor size, LX100 actually competes as much with Sony RX100.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 1, 2014 at 22:11 UTC as 130th comment | 2 replies
On Sony shows off upcoming full-frame lenses at Photokina article (328 comments in total)
In reply to:

plamens: Except 28/2 all of the lenses are HUGE!!
The main concept of the mirrorless is the small size, but with these HUGE lenses..
Absolutely meaningless!!!
They are even bigger and heavier than the same DSLR lenses!
Sony, please consider to make small lenses, like olympus, panasonic, fujifilm and samsung stuffs!
That because I would not buy any of them!
Maybe except 28/2:)

Naveed, my response is based on the usual assumption that there is noticeable benefit in terms of size and weight if the lens is an APS-c vs FF. We seem to agree that is not true.

It is just that some seem to apply equivalence to argue that point, that 50-140/2.8 which is 70-200 "equivalent" is better choice than a FF 70-200/2.8 lens on APS-c (which, coincidentally, is a point even DPR authors seem to push for). We're then looking at two different applications, one becomes more about telephoto use. Sort of like arguing in favor of 55mm prime for portrait ("85mm equiv") vs a lens that is 85mm.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2014 at 21:17 UTC
On Opinion: Bring on the 70-200mm equivalents article (328 comments in total)
In reply to:

mosc: I just find myself dreaming of an APS-C 70-140 f1.8 stabilized Sigma that's ~$1200. Cmon sigma, blow the FF cameras away forever. Bonus points if you deliver this lens for E mount instead.

Let us not forget... Sigma DC 18-35/1.8 is about $1/gram. The premium might go up, with a lens that has a filter size larger than the camera body. :D

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2014 at 21:05 UTC
In reply to:

Rooru S: If they want professionals to take Sony seriously, they shouldn't stop R&D of A-mount lenses. There is a bunch of lenses that need an update quickly and there are serious holes in the A-mount lineup (for example, a set of constant F4 zoom lenses to complement the SAL1635Z, SAL2470Z, SAL70200G).

And if we talk about Camera bodies...where is the 1DX/D4s competitor that many professionals prefer to use? What about a proper D800 competitor with a proper AF module? Right now the a99 is only competing against the D600/6D and is losing.

Right now the Minolta Engineers are thinking what the hell they're doing with Sony after they're leaving A-mount in the dust...

Good point. And Loxia line could enable just that.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2014 at 19:35 UTC
On Sony shows off upcoming full-frame lenses at Photokina article (328 comments in total)
In reply to:

marco1974: OK, so now we finally will have a 35/1.4... but it'll be the same size as the 24-240 superzoom! So much for the mirrorless advantage in terms of size and weight.
But oh, wait: we also have the more compact 35/2.8, don't we? But then the DOF and the total light-gathering ability is the same as that of a 23/2 on APS-c (which could obviously be much more compact to begin with). So much for the FF advantage in terms of DOF and ISO.
Mmmh, it seems that in spite of marketing claims, one just can't beat the laws of physics. Bummer.

@marco1874

If building a compact, high quality, optically corrected 35/1.4 were easy with a compact body, we would see more of them. Here are some that you need to consider in your argument:
Sony 35/1.4 G (A-mount): 69mm x 76mm, 510g
Canon 35/1.4 L (EF-mount): 79mm x 86mm, 580g
Nikon 35/1.4 G (F-mount): 83mm x 89mm, 601g
Sigma 35/1.4 ART (EF-mount): 77mm x 94mm, 665g
Zeiss Distagon 35/1.4 (EF-mount): 78mm x 120mm, 830g

These are relatively large lenses (and definitely, if you consider the latest designs). It does surprise me that Sony chose to go with Distagon formula for the E-mount. All of these lenses will be still larger when used on E-mount (add the length of the adapter, about 24-26mm).

So, while the Distagon is big, those who want something else, can always get 35/2.8 as a tiny solution, or even Loxia 35/2 which is going to be quite small and light.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2014 at 19:32 UTC
On Sony shows off upcoming full-frame lenses at Photokina article (328 comments in total)
In reply to:

Black Box: They promised the same for Sony E. Still waiting.

Still waiting for what?

IMO, while Sony had launched E-mount with FF scope (well, they did have a FF video camera, NEX-VG900), I think it started more as an experiment to evaluate the market (which is also where the acronym NEX comes from: New E-mount eXperience... could have easily been eXperiment).

The one lens that was on the early road map was a mid-tele prime, which I'd assume to be 85mm. That FL makes sense as a FF lens. And while its launched was expected sooner, I think Sony later decided to skip f/1.8 and go with f/1.4... which IMO would be unfortunate given that it will not be smaller and lighter. I am hoping to see something more along the lines of the fantastic FE 55.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2014 at 19:20 UTC
On Sony shows off upcoming full-frame lenses at Photokina article (328 comments in total)
In reply to:

halc: Why so slow lenses?

Where is the old Minolta optical-mechanical prowess?

A line of bigger and heavier f/2.8 zooms makes sense following release of common-sense f/4 options on a mount that prioritizes portability.

When Sony does get to a point of considering f/2.8 zooms, IMO, instead of 24-70, I'd rather see 35-105 (it will also appeal to APS-c buyers).

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2014 at 19:14 UTC
On Sony shows off upcoming full-frame lenses at Photokina article (328 comments in total)
In reply to:

Black Box: "The roadmap is approximate, subject to change, and does not indicate actual release dates."

I give you a definite maybe!

Someone has finally discovered what a road map means!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2014 at 19:00 UTC
On Sony shows off upcoming full-frame lenses at Photokina article (328 comments in total)
In reply to:

plamens: Except 28/2 all of the lenses are HUGE!!
The main concept of the mirrorless is the small size, but with these HUGE lenses..
Absolutely meaningless!!!
They are even bigger and heavier than the same DSLR lenses!
Sony, please consider to make small lenses, like olympus, panasonic, fujifilm and samsung stuffs!
That because I would not buy any of them!
Maybe except 28/2:)

@Naveed,
A lens can be shorter when it uses shorter FL and/or also longer flange. System size matters. For example, you can find a 70-200/4 from SLR mount that is about the same size as FE 70-200/4. However, you have to add to the length of the SLR-mount lens to be useful. Keep that in mind.

As for the other point, make FL same, and you will quickly find that APSc lenses and FF lenses are virtually identical in size and weight. The only way you can argue is based only on equivalence (and this is why I find articles like one DPR posted couple of days ago, comparing 70-200 "equiv" to 70-200 FL lenses absurd and leading cause of misleading people).

Here is a comparison that illustrates both of my points above:
Sony Planar 85/1.4 (A-mount, Full Frame): 75mm x 81mm, 650g
Samsung 85/1.4 (NX-mount, APS-C): 79mm x 92mm, 696g

The APS-c lens here is larger and heavier. But, especially on length. Why? Think about it.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2014 at 18:58 UTC
On Sony shows off upcoming full-frame lenses at Photokina article (328 comments in total)
In reply to:

mjoshi: It says E-Mount so will this work with Sony A6000 or this is only meant for Sony A7 series ?

bluevellet, I've looked at the competition, and prefer Sony. I was simply pointing at a fact that you didn't realize D7100 was APS-c.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2014 at 18:49 UTC
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