dark goob

dark goob

Lives in United States Portland, OR, OR, United States
Joined on Jul 12, 2005

Comments

Total: 287, showing: 61 – 80
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On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 First Impressions Review preview (301 comments in total)
In reply to:

Serious Sam: In Australia

$900 Panasonic Lumix GM5 Kit

$1000 Nikon D7100 Kit

$798 Sony A6000 Digital SLR with 2 Lenses

You serious asking that much for a m43 when the other choice is that much better?? Someone need to give Panasonic a wake up call.

Sadly, like the term "full-frame," the term "DSLR" has become utterly divorced from its original meaning today.

Blame it on e-commerce sites like Amazon, where they already had a category called "DSLR" and didn't see fit to change the name. And Sony wants to sell the A5000 alongside Nikon D3200 in that category so they say it's a "DSLR". The consumer doesn't give a crap.

Same thing with "full-frame" which used to refer to a relationship between a lens's intended frame (what it was optimized for) and the film-frame it gets used on, or sensor-frame as the case became. Now "full-frame" just means "35mm format" to most people, because they're idiots, and don't know the meanings of words, nor care about proper usage.

All I'm saying is, don't complain about the A6000 being called a DSLR, if you're someone who also calls 35mm-format, "full-frame". Because both usages are stupid bastardizations.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2014 at 05:49 UTC
On High-end full frame roundup (2014) article (603 comments in total)
In reply to:

halfwaythere: Its pretty sad that even dpr has succumbed to the " low ISO dynamic range matters above all" theory.

I think most enthusiast FF users are using these bodies for their low light, high ISO, superiority. I don't get how is the A7 recommended above the 6D since the latter has access to the most comprehensive system while the former is, basically, a cheap mirrorless camera that happens to have a FF sensor.

@Scheisschen -

If your camera hasn't turned on yet, and you miss the shot, then how much does image quality matter? So now you must keep it on all the time, which is lame because on mirrorless cameras the battery is already smaller and every second the camera is turned on uses exponentially more power than with a DSLR (with live view off).

People do care about picture quality but we are splitting hairs between most of these cameras, as you know. If you're a pro, your customer is likely much more interested that you got the right pictures, rather than infinitesimal differences in what it looks like blown up 200% in Photoshop.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2014 at 05:42 UTC
On High-end full frame roundup (2014) article (603 comments in total)
In reply to:

halfwaythere: Its pretty sad that even dpr has succumbed to the " low ISO dynamic range matters above all" theory.

I think most enthusiast FF users are using these bodies for their low light, high ISO, superiority. I don't get how is the A7 recommended above the 6D since the latter has access to the most comprehensive system while the former is, basically, a cheap mirrorless camera that happens to have a FF sensor.

6D's much longer battery life and much faster startup time, IMHO, are far more important advantages than anything to do with the actual image quality.

Because what good is a picture you didn't get, due to a dead battery or because your camera didn't "boot up" fast enough?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2014 at 05:27 UTC
On High-end full frame roundup (2014) article (603 comments in total)

Where is Leica on your list? Also, why limit it to just 35mm?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 7, 2014 at 23:05 UTC as 107th comment | 3 replies

Non-mirrorless ... ...

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2014 at 22:53 UTC as 33rd comment
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 First Impressions Review preview (301 comments in total)
In reply to:

Serious Sam: In Australia

$900 Panasonic Lumix GM5 Kit

$1000 Nikon D7100 Kit

$798 Sony A6000 Digital SLR with 2 Lenses

You serious asking that much for a m43 when the other choice is that much better?? Someone need to give Panasonic a wake up call.

Anyone who buys ANY new camera when it first comes out and is at its highest price it will ever be, is paying "the early adopter tax."

Just wait until it's as old as A6000.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2014 at 05:48 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 First Impressions Review preview (301 comments in total)
In reply to:

GoneMirrorless: The GM5 makes the A6000 look/feel like a DSLR.
I do believe the camera is pricey and not for me but even with several prime lenses or the kit zoom it fits in pockets and is very stealthy. IIRC it has the electronic shutter option which is silent.
I think it needs to be closer to what the RX100iii sells for, but maybe demand is high?

LOL. You sell something for what people will pay for it. Then you drop the price when they stop buying.

That's basic math.

RX100 has nothing to do with anything.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2014 at 05:45 UTC
On Real-world test: Going pro with the Samsung NX1 article (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Adrien S: So... I totally need a body with these specs BUT A FULL-FRAME SENSOR.

On the day they release a FF body with similar specifications (and a comparatively low price!), Samsung can just take my money.

Point is I'm right. "Full frame" is a meaningless term these days. CHANGE THE LINGO. It's stupid!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 3, 2014 at 08:02 UTC
On Real-world test: Going pro with the Samsung NX1 article (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Adrien S: So... I totally need a body with these specs BUT A FULL-FRAME SENSOR.

On the day they release a FF body with similar specifications (and a comparatively low price!), Samsung can just take my money.

Yes, it is. All the Samsung NX lenses are full frame relative to the APS-C sensor in the NX-1 body. "Full frame" defines a *relationship* between the lens and sensor, it does not define a specific size. Just because all you idiots abuse the English language and misuse this term doesn't change the meaning of the words.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2014 at 08:06 UTC
On Real-world test: Going pro with the Samsung NX1 article (369 comments in total)

I love how they never mentioned battery life, once, in this video.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2014 at 07:34 UTC as 41st comment | 4 replies
On Real-world test: Going pro with the Samsung NX1 article (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Adrien S: So... I totally need a body with these specs BUT A FULL-FRAME SENSOR.

On the day they release a FF body with similar specifications (and a comparatively low price!), Samsung can just take my money.

It is full frame, idiot.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2014 at 07:33 UTC

What, so the light doesn't go in your lens unless you have a smartphone or GoPro?

What about Sony ActionCam? Nikon D810?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 01:48 UTC as 10th comment | 3 replies

This pretty much says it all.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2014 at 07:10 UTC as 91st comment
On JVC introduces GY-LS300 4K camcorder with MFT mount article (79 comments in total)

This looks awesome. Now I can finally upgrade my Canon GL2 and use all my Olympus glass. Sweet.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2014 at 19:41 UTC as 12th comment | 2 replies

Hooray!

A scourge on all good things has been eliminated from reality.

Celebrate!!

I'll toast to this!

Halleluah!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 9, 2014 at 07:09 UTC as 94th comment | 1 reply
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II: A professional's opinion article (502 comments in total)

The 7D has plenty of lenses that are full-frame relative to it.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 23, 2014 at 14:41 UTC as 66th comment
On Canon introduces new $78K 50-1000mm cine lens article (173 comments in total)
In reply to:

dark goob: I applaud DPreview for not mentioning "equivalence" in this article, and for not calling Super35 a "crop sensor".

I'm glad we've finally evolved beyond calling things "full-frame" vs. "crop". Clearly, when Canon's most advanced optics by far are made full-frame relative to Super35 (24.9x14mm), which is much smaller even than an 16:9 APS film frame, we are finally in the future where 135-format's long dominance over the cultural milieu has ended.

Maybe now DPreview would be open to switching to using Range Factor terminology. This lens is a 2.01:1–41.08:1 Range Factor. The ratio is D:W, where D=distance-to-subject, and W=width-across-frame. I.e. a 1-foot ruler will occupy the entire width of the frame left-to-right from 41.08 feet away at 1000mm. With the extender it increases to a max of 59.76:1.

"Compare" this to a Canon SX60HS which has a Range Factor of 0.62:1–39.55:1 on its 1/2.3"-format (6.2x4.6mm) sensor, which is a 27% crop of Super35.

Well, I don't think that having a foggy, milky "intuition" or "feel" for something really counts for much. Sounds like what new age people say about the spiritual power of crystals.

What that "intuition" actually is, is just a feeling of familiarity and recognition, and a vague idea that only approximately corresponds with reality. It's not actually useful for anything specific. It has no degree of precision. Very complex math involving trigonometric equations and squares is necessary to determine anything useful from it about the angle of view or the extent of the captured frame at a given distance.

Further because camera manufacturers report the *actual* aperture but only the *equivalent* focal length, then it leads to even more confusion for consumers. This is bad.

The first step is moving away from 35mm-equivalent focal lengths and only using Range Factor (or something similar), while also ditching the idea of calling 35mm "full-frame" since "full" is a purely relative term.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 17, 2014 at 23:05 UTC
On Canon introduces new $78K 50-1000mm cine lens article (173 comments in total)
In reply to:

dark goob: I applaud DPreview for not mentioning "equivalence" in this article, and for not calling Super35 a "crop sensor".

I'm glad we've finally evolved beyond calling things "full-frame" vs. "crop". Clearly, when Canon's most advanced optics by far are made full-frame relative to Super35 (24.9x14mm), which is much smaller even than an 16:9 APS film frame, we are finally in the future where 135-format's long dominance over the cultural milieu has ended.

Maybe now DPreview would be open to switching to using Range Factor terminology. This lens is a 2.01:1–41.08:1 Range Factor. The ratio is D:W, where D=distance-to-subject, and W=width-across-frame. I.e. a 1-foot ruler will occupy the entire width of the frame left-to-right from 41.08 feet away at 1000mm. With the extender it increases to a max of 59.76:1.

"Compare" this to a Canon SX60HS which has a Range Factor of 0.62:1–39.55:1 on its 1/2.3"-format (6.2x4.6mm) sensor, which is a 27% crop of Super35.

@random78
In that respect I have no sympathy for people who say "we have to develop the intuition all over again about what those mean" because first of all, I highly question the idea that anyone actually really does know "what those mean."

I'm sure you know what the normal focal lengths "mean": 24, 28, 36, 50, 70, 85, 105, 135, 200, 300mm, etc.

But what about 247mm? 12.9mm? 21.4mm? 43mm? There are an awful lot of weird ones nowadays if you actually do the conversions and don't round it up to the nearest decimal (which is especially dumb to do at the wide end). I challenge anyone who thinks they really know what these 135-equivalent focal lengths "mean", to honestly sit down and try to write down how far away you would have to be from a 6' tall person to get their whole body in the frame, top-to-bottom, with focal lengths of every whole number from 1 to 50.

Now I'm sure you don't know how to do that. Nobody does. So people will say, "yeah but I have a *feel* for those numbers."

Direct link | Posted on Oct 17, 2014 at 22:59 UTC
On Canon introduces new $78K 50-1000mm cine lens article (173 comments in total)
In reply to:

dark goob: I applaud DPreview for not mentioning "equivalence" in this article, and for not calling Super35 a "crop sensor".

I'm glad we've finally evolved beyond calling things "full-frame" vs. "crop". Clearly, when Canon's most advanced optics by far are made full-frame relative to Super35 (24.9x14mm), which is much smaller even than an 16:9 APS film frame, we are finally in the future where 135-format's long dominance over the cultural milieu has ended.

Maybe now DPreview would be open to switching to using Range Factor terminology. This lens is a 2.01:1–41.08:1 Range Factor. The ratio is D:W, where D=distance-to-subject, and W=width-across-frame. I.e. a 1-foot ruler will occupy the entire width of the frame left-to-right from 41.08 feet away at 1000mm. With the extender it increases to a max of 59.76:1.

"Compare" this to a Canon SX60HS which has a Range Factor of 0.62:1–39.55:1 on its 1/2.3"-format (6.2x4.6mm) sensor, which is a 27% crop of Super35.

@random78
With all due respect, I am opposed to the idea that it is a bad thing to develop new ideas, new intuitions. I believe that is the benefit of being human: we are allowed to be creative, and we have the capacity to learn and to think.

Setting things up in a way that makes logical sense and is mathematically useful follows the spirit of photography. For example the F-stop numbers and flash guide numbers were developed to make it easy to determine the distance-to-subject necessary for a proper exposure using simple division, as opposed to having to perform algebra or trigonometry. The disadvantage to using degrees (or hey, radians!) would be that almost no one can perform arctan in their head. Sorry, but you can't.

The advantage to the Range Factor idea is that, like guide numbers and f-stops, it deals with distance-to-subject and only depends on simple multiplication.

If your range factor is 41:1 and your subject is 3-meters wide, 41x3 = 123 meters distance-to-subject.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 17, 2014 at 22:53 UTC
On Canon introduces new $78K 50-1000mm cine lens article (173 comments in total)

I applaud DPreview for not mentioning "equivalence" in this article, and for not calling Super35 a "crop sensor".

I'm glad we've finally evolved beyond calling things "full-frame" vs. "crop". Clearly, when Canon's most advanced optics by far are made full-frame relative to Super35 (24.9x14mm), which is much smaller even than an 16:9 APS film frame, we are finally in the future where 135-format's long dominance over the cultural milieu has ended.

Maybe now DPreview would be open to switching to using Range Factor terminology. This lens is a 2.01:1–41.08:1 Range Factor. The ratio is D:W, where D=distance-to-subject, and W=width-across-frame. I.e. a 1-foot ruler will occupy the entire width of the frame left-to-right from 41.08 feet away at 1000mm. With the extender it increases to a max of 59.76:1.

"Compare" this to a Canon SX60HS which has a Range Factor of 0.62:1–39.55:1 on its 1/2.3"-format (6.2x4.6mm) sensor, which is a 27% crop of Super35.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 17, 2014 at 15:46 UTC as 31st comment | 10 replies
Total: 287, showing: 61 – 80
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