Kawika Nui

Kawika Nui

Lives in United States United States
Works as a Undeclared/General Ed
Joined on Sep 16, 2010
About me:

Keep shooting

Comments

Total: 238, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Kodak reborn: A look at JK Imaging's 2014 lineup (201 comments in total)
In reply to:

jhwaaser: I am shocked at the lousy response to the Kodak name on here. Kodak invented digital photography, and Kodak, Nikon, and Olympus, all involved in film photography, were the first to tame the excess contrast of the charge coupled device. As a professional photographer, I tried Agfa, Ilford, and even earlier, Ansco products, but I discovered that Nikon cameras and Kodak film, paper, and chemicals made it easier for mecto make top quality photos without problems. I owned, used, and loved Kodak Z510 and Z712 cameras (okay, so my C735 was a p.o.s.) and I thought I would wait and get a Z-Max at a cheap price when they went out of business, but they sold out of that model first, and I lost out. One of my favorite film cameras was the Retina, and I had a iiic stolen out of a Stouffers motel, and haven't bought a Stouffers product since! High-end Kodak products rock, and I hope that the new products treat the brand name as well as, say, the resurrected Triumph motorcycles....

Great. So give Kodak a display case in the Photography Hall of Fame. Then we can all go out and take pictures with cameras that offer far more today.
And no one is giving a "lousy response to the Kodak name." They are responding to this camera, with these features, at this price.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2016 at 15:45 UTC
On article Kodak reborn: A look at JK Imaging's 2014 lineup (201 comments in total)
In reply to:

harley13: Kodak is a great (was) company that invented , basically photography. Sony really???A great company to be sure but KODAK commands better than what some folks say. Go Kodak.

Nostalgia is great but now is now, and either the products are better or they aren't.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2016 at 15:40 UTC
In reply to:

Teru Kage: Impressive, but the price is a major barrier. I wonder if Olympus will create a similar non-stabilized version?

Agree about the price; wait 6 months and get a used one much cheaper.
As for xx-300mm, the Lumix 100-300mm works great. It is half the weight and a fraction of the price of the 100-400mm. But if you want the extra reach (and, one suspects the extra IQ), the new lens is worth it.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 8, 2016 at 22:30 UTC
In reply to:

Chaitanya S: Interesting addition to micro 4/3 finally this system is getting tele lenses.

This lens is a welcome addition, although it weighs almost twice as much as the 100-300mm, and costs 2-3 times more. But one can always wait six months and pick up a good used one much cheaper than the new price.
As for adapters for Canon (or Tamron or Sigma) or other lenses, that means more expense, more bulk, more weight, more hassle and often a loss of one or more functions (AF, etc.)
I had been flirting with the idea of the Sony a6300 and getting a Sigma 150-500 to overcome the lack of long zoom Sony lenses, but that would require an adapter, etc.
The a6300's larger sensor and higher pixel count are tempting, but without long reach I can't use it. This new Panny lens solves the problem nicely.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 8, 2016 at 22:25 UTC
In reply to:

jalywol: The link on this page goes to the DMC-ZS100 / TZ100, not the 100-400mm....

One month later, and the link is still the same. GIGO.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 8, 2016 at 22:21 UTC

When I click the link that says:
"View our hands-on preview of the Panasonic Leica DG 100-400mm F3.5-5.6"

I am directed to the Lumix zs100 review:
http://www.dpreview.com/news/1743027483/far-reaching-panasonic-lumix-dmc-zs100-tz100-hands-on-preview

Direct link | Posted on Feb 8, 2016 at 22:16 UTC as 1st comment

"a less-often seen side of sharks as peaceful creatures"
Sharks, like some dogs, are very peaceful until they're not.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2016 at 17:05 UTC as 19th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Ross the Fidller: Looks like a nice & interesting compact, with a 1"sensor, but why do North Americans have to have their own naming that's different to the rest of the world? Canon Rebel comes to mind too.

It's "ZS" in Mexico and Argentina (I haven't bothered to check other Latin American countries). So the US-bashing is pretty silly. Blame the Western Hemisphere if you must blame someone. Or ask why the rest of the world doesn't conform to the "New World."

Direct link | Posted on Jan 13, 2016 at 16:29 UTC
In reply to:

Just a Photographer: I do believe Virtual Reality will have its place, but not for photo viewing.

The point of photographing scenes is to point out the beauty or to put emphasis on the subject. However in many cases only part of the view is worthwhile to look at. The rest of the screen if often distracting or not filled with the same beauty.

Surely you don't think I meant to imply that each/any latest techno-toy is a good thing.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 25, 2015 at 19:53 UTC
On article The big beast: hands on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 (1297 comments in total)
In reply to:

bernardf12: The only reason I don't like this camera is because it doesn't have a tilting screen. The flip out screens require too many actions to get to the tilting position. And you have to go through these actions repeatedly through your day shooting. Others may like this, but it's not for me because I use the tilted screen quite often.

"do you use the tilt screen in portrait mode?
i didn't think so."
Why didn't you think so?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 22, 2015 at 02:34 UTC
On article The big beast: hands on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 (1297 comments in total)
In reply to:

pixelcollector: advantage over my 2 year old pen:
swivel LCD, weather sealing.
nearly all other features are identical. why is this camera so massive? bulkier camera = higher price tag?

So your 2 year old pen had 4K video, 8MP stills at 30fps, etc., etc.?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 22, 2015 at 02:32 UTC
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (751 comments in total)
In reply to:

bernardf12: The annoying flip out screen can be added to the list. Why would you want a feature that will help you 2% of the time (over a tilt screen), but annoys you every time you take a photo. It also makes it harder to compose because you have to turn your head away from the subject you are photographing. My flip out screen ended up not being used for tilting, and stored with the screen outside. In that configuration it functions as a fixed screen, so as a design it is a big failure to me.

OK, so you don't see any use for a feature that many of us use every day to shoot from unusual angles, etc.
Just because you don't have a use for something doesn't mean it isn't useful.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 16:01 UTC
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (751 comments in total)
In reply to:

WellyNZ: I see that my digital photography colleagues are still continuing to place importance on gear over photographs, despite more or less any camera costing upwards of a couple of hundred dollars/pounds/euros being capable of generating images that far outweigh the quality (technically speaking) of images from almost any 35mm camera ever made.

I'd wager if you're unable to create a high quality image from almost any of these mirrorless cameras, the problem is probably not with the technology.

"more or less any camera costing upwards of a couple of hundred dollars/pounds/euros being capable of generating images that far outweigh the quality (technically speaking) of images from almost any 35mm camera ever made."
Why stop there? Go ahead, say it--you'll feel better:
"My cell phone takes better pictures."

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 15:58 UTC
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (751 comments in total)
In reply to:

b craw: Personally I MT's opinion to be well articulated - and I agree with a fair portion of what he expresses. However, what I do find very unfortunate is that such material is used in service of a myth (apparently held by many here) that there exists a singlar core of needs for the 'professional' photographer. Professional photography encompasses a wide range of methods - and gear only need meet the requirements specific to each method. In the past (at least the one I remember), it was common to have a modest collection of cameras to function in different contexts - each doing 'its' thing a bit different than its neighbor. And this appreciation for the relative delights of different cameras, formats, etc., was a healthy part of one's general development within the medium. What happened to this? Perhaps I'm being a bit pollyannaish in reference to the past, but something in the contemporary tech-obsessed mindset promotes a mutual exclusivity which need not exist - so much desparate territorialism. Now, admittedly as a specific type of art photographer (formerly a professor of photography), I don't need 1000+ shots per battery - I do get that others do. What I do need (or prefer) is the really satisfying tactile interaction found, say, in the upper portion of the Fuji X line (a more modestly priced translation of the Leica ethos, if you will). And when I need other things, I have other cameras. It seems a real bummer to me that so many in photography are subject to a constant din of 'shortcomings', particularly with respect to mirrorless, rather than experiencing the rather amazing creative and technical latitude they afford.

" What happened to this? "
Money. Hassle. Weight. Bulk.
It's a bit like film: it was fun and satisfying and delivered great results, but could also be expensive, time- and space-consuming (darkroom) and troublesome.
There's a reason photographers went to digital, and a reason to pare down the number of cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 15:57 UTC
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (751 comments in total)
In reply to:

DrummerCT: For the type of photography I do, changing out a battery is generally not an issue for me, certainly not the comparative hassle changing 36-shot film used to be. And if I need a more extended battery experience, l add the vertical grip to my A7RII (doubles battery, plus improves handling for some situations). Or I use a second body. That said, for others l understand that battery capabilities for mirrorless cameras can be an obstacle/disruptive. If Sony and others improved the battery tech, all types of users would benefit.

Thank goodness manufacturers aren't going the route of mobile phones and sealing in THE battery.

Changing batteries would be far less hassle if cameras were all designed so that batteries could be changed with a tripod plate attached to the camera. Even if one doesn't always shoot from a tripod, many people prefer just to leave the plate on for convenience or when switching back and forth. Most battery compartments are still not accessible with the tripod plate attached.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 15:54 UTC
On article 2015 Roundup: Long Zoom Compacts (68 comments in total)
In reply to:

skytripper: This is the silliest "roundup" ever, guys. You're comparing big honking cameras that weigh from 1.5 to almost 2 lbs. with pocket cameras weighing less than 8 oz. What's the point?

Aren't they comparing by category (superzoom, etc.) not weight? For those who start with performance as the number one priority in a given category, this is very useful. If there are tradeoffs in getting a pocket camera, it's good to know what they are (pocketable, but lacks XYZ) And vice versa (bigger, but has XYX).

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 15:46 UTC
On article 2015 Roundup: Long Zoom Compacts (68 comments in total)
In reply to:

Polacofede: Is there any statistics about the amount of people that gets this cameras for video purposes? ( Or even any camera being compact or DSLR )
Honestly from all the people I know there is a very small bunch of them that ever uses it. I know this is not representative by any means. Just asking to determine also how much video performance should weight in a camera review.

Pola,
Remember, it's not just about shooting 4K video. It's also about being able to shoot 8MP images at 30fps with almost no limit. This means catching every millisecond of action at a very decent frame rate, with enough resolution for excellent small-medium prints or viewing on a monitor.
Also, as more people get ultra high-res monitors and TVs, the usefulness will increase.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 15:44 UTC
On article 2015 Roundup: Long Zoom Compacts (68 comments in total)

Nice roundup and nice quick comparison of FZ300 with other cameras.
The surf shots? Clearly not taken by a surfer or surf photographer! (Unless these are "blackmail" shots to embarrass the subjects with at a later date.) \;>D

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 15:40 UTC as 9th comment
On article Good genes: Samsung NX500 review posted (512 comments in total)
In reply to:

jesus_freak: Samsung offer cutting edge technology, but the NX1 and NX500 need to be priced lower in order to compete. The competition in this segment is fierce:

Micro 4/3:
- Current bodies in all price ranges (GH4, G7, E-M1, E-M5, E-M10)
- Strong video line-up
- Large selection of zoom and primes

Sony:
- Low priced APS-C bodies (A6000, A5100) previous generation
- Upgrade path to full frame A7 series
- Decent lens selection

Samsung:
- Class leading technology
- Above average prices on current bodies (NX1, NX500)
- Competent lens selection

Samsung have positioned themselves at the upper end of the mirrorless price spectrum. In order to continue to command a sustained premium, Samsung need to show a long-term commitment to this user group. The recent Pentax Gold Service program for the 645Z is a perfect example of how to compete at the upper end.

Otherwise, Samsung will lose sales to customers who feel that bodies like the A6000 and A5100 ($478 & $378) are good enough and a better value

JF,
Thanks for the comparison; it's useful.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 15:34 UTC
On article Good genes: Samsung NX500 review posted (512 comments in total)
In reply to:

arrr: I find it interesting that "Manufacturer commitment to firmware updates" is listed as a pro.

Dale has a good point, but so many manufacturers release significant firmware upgrades that it really seems this is more like par for the course. The lack of upgrades would be a negative; unless the upgrades are incredibly more significant than those of competitors they would simply rate a passing mention.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 15:28 UTC
Total: 238, showing: 1 – 20
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