RRJackson

RRJackson

Lives in United States Bradenton, United States
Joined on Apr 27, 2008
About me:

Nikon F5
Nikon D700
Samsung NX10

Sigma 20-40mm f2.8 DG EX Aspherical
Samsung 30mm f/2 pancake
Rodenstock TV Heligon 42mm f/0.75
Sigma 50mm f/2.8 EX DG Macro
Sigma 150mm f/2.8 APO Macro EX DG HSM
Sigma 300mm f/4 APO Tele Macro
Kenko Teleplus Pro 300 1.4x teleconverter
Kinor 28-80mm f/3.5 Macro Zoom
Loreo Lens in Cap 35mm f/5.6 with Lubot 10x Loupe
Vivitar 90-230mm f/4.5 Close Focus
Spiratone 300mm f/5.6
Soligor C/D 500mm f/8 Macro

Comments

Total: 73, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

dansclic: High quality at moderate prices ???? I Am dead !!!! If you want quality you have to pay for, cheap stuff from sigma is not a good deal : 50 per cent is decentered, mecanical problems, un reliable autofocus.....
So again a 1700 USD Lens and what ? Buy a used nikon or canon instead.

Yeah, I've owned a few Sigma lenses, too. Going all the way back to my old Sigma manual focus 70-210mm f/2.8 APO. Currently I have the 20-40mm f/2.8 EX DG Aspherical, the 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM, the 150mm f/2.8 EX DG HSM APO Macro and the 300mm f/4 APO Tele Macro. I've had no problems with any of them. No decentering. No autofocus issues. Nothing. My guess is that a LOT of the complaining about quality issues with 3rd party lenses is coming from people hired by the majors to spread fear, uncertainty and doubt.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 13, 2012 at 09:23 UTC
On Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm F1.8 Preview preview (213 comments in total)
In reply to:

PioneerPhoto: And I thought white lenses looked bad...

Aw man, what about those white Mitchell high speed cameras that NASA and the military used to use? Those were cool. They were white to minimize heat when used in the desert.

Direct link | Posted on May 25, 2012 at 15:44 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

ybizzle: Nothing that a D800 or 5D MKIII couldn't produce...At less than half the cost!

@rhlpetrus Actually, that's a terrible way to work, IMO. It's a subtractive process. What you're doing is dropping the levels on one of your color channels and essentially removing even more information from your photograph. It's much better to use an optical filter with a monochrome sensor the same way you did when you shot B&W film.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 23:34 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

bigdaddave: 1930's throwback intentionally crippled and they want how much for it?

If I ever see someone with one of these I will make sure I laugh at them

BTW, in terms of filters I've gone through years of my life with a #8 yellow filter on my lens. I'm not saying that's an ideal methodology, but it's a very good general-purpose filter for B&W and it only knocks a stop off the incoming light. I have a small cabinet full of filters, but even now I tend to use a #8 yellow filter when I shoot B&W.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 22:37 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lupti: Ok, I say take an ordinary DSLR, set it to B/W and take the same shots. I doubt that most people can distinguish them from the Leica shots if not told from what camera they are. Really. I also would go as far as taking an ordinary P&S with B/W mode and compare them with these.
I don´t see the point of this camera aside from being a new toy for people with too much money. I also never understood what´s so great about the Leica system, the cameras and lenses cost megabucks for what reason? Handmade in Germany, a red dot? But the parts are so expensive there isn´t money anmyore for a higher resolution display? Okay...there are still too much people with too much money.
And no, there is no envy at all.
Now I think some people will tell me I´m trolling(I´m not) or that I don´t understand the special art of photographing with a Leica, but really, I couldn´t care less.

Photos can be taken however you feel like taking them. B&W photos taken using a camera with a Bayer filter will show artifacts (defects, errors...whatever word works best for you) that betray the limitations of the process. Many professionals will recognize this limitation of your methodology, but that doesn't mean you can't use it. People have shot parts of feature films on Fisher-Price Pixelvision cameras.

As far as coming up with a percentage of detriment, the green pixels make up 50% of the pixels captured. That's the highest percentage of pixels captured by a single set of pixels, so in absolute terms a Bayer camera will be able to capture half as much resolution as a similar non-Bayer camera. But it isn't that simple because the Debayer algorithms have become very sophisticated at interpolation, so there appears to be more information on-hand than there actually is. So '25% detrimental' may be a good apparent conclusion.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 22:27 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bluetrain048: For those debating the PS/Lightroom black&white conversions versus this black&white sensor, there is one thing to consider.

It has already been mentioned that having no CFA, AA and debayering going on you gain a large resolution advantage (and the samples, to me, really show it).

However, when you use the colour sliders to adjust the black and white conversion from colour, you are losing even more resolution. If you drop the blue channel for instance (to simulate a dark red filter - gives you dramatic skies), you are essentially losing much of the information / resolution those blue pixels would provide.

Try it. Crank down the blue and green sliders in a black and white conversion and then look 100% at the sky, the clouds, the hills and surrounding areas. You will probably notice nasty pixelisation, posterisation and other artifacts.

FWIW I 'get' both sides of the colour vs B&W argument. But a conversion versus a native mono sensor will be leagues apart.

Like I said, if Instagram-style pretend-B&W images are your goal then you'll do just fine in Lightroom or PS. I mean, I do it sometimes, too. I have Alien Skins Exposure. I find it does a fairly good job of approximating the look of B&W film for the occasional shot where it seems apropos. But it's a subtractive process and it does degrade the image. Just like correcting for lens distortion degrades the image. In a web-sized image you won't notice it most of the time, but in a large print it will sometimes jump right out at you.

But yes, mediocre quality is good enough for most people most of the time.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 19:31 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

ybizzle: Nothing that a D800 or 5D MKIII couldn't produce...At less than half the cost!

It's not a question of "how sharp" it is in that, "Hey, this here lens is pretty sharp!" kind of way. Monochrome capture is a process that eliminates the Bayer array, so data interpolation is absent from the process. Now this may or may not appeal to you and the cost may drive you into some kind of frenzy, but it's a superior methodology to Bayer capture if a monochrome end result is your goal.

Now certainly you can bemoan the old Kodak CCD technology underlying the camera. I prefer CCDs in a lot of ways, but low light capture hasn't been their strong suit and it's been a point of contention. And you can bemoan the manual focus rangefinder design which is again a matter of personal taste.

At the end of the day all you can really say is that the way you capture monochrome images is good enough for you and you don't need superior dedicated monochrome capture equipment. And that's fine. It could never be asserted that this is a camera for the masses.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 19:09 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

hammerheadfistpunch: pretty images? yeah. better images? Arguable. but the thing that I keep coming back to is the term "diminishing returns". $13 grand is a lot of money for a camera that does one thing, albeit well.

You don't have to mount the most expensive lens made by Leica to use the camera. My personal preference would be the Zeiss 21mm f/4.5, which is $1100.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 19:01 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

ybizzle: Nothing that a D800 or 5D MKIII couldn't produce...At less than half the cost!

The comparable explanation is that current sensors can't capture color information. So the way people approximate that is by using a process similar to the old Technicolor 3-strip process. An 18-megapixel "color" camera takes 9 million green photos, 4 1/2 million blue photos and 4 1/2 million red photos for every exposure. And then an automated process combines those and approximates what the output might have looked like if 18 million full-color images had been captured. The difference or error is something we just live with. And then on top of that level of distortion some people like to do a subtractive conversion that removes even more information and they think this B&W end result is an acceptable substitute for a process that removes all of these variables from the process of capture. But it isn't.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 18:01 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

hammerheadfistpunch: pretty images? yeah. better images? Arguable. but the thing that I keep coming back to is the term "diminishing returns". $13 grand is a lot of money for a camera that does one thing, albeit well.

The camera lists for $7950, not $13,000.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 17:55 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bluetrain048: For those debating the PS/Lightroom black&white conversions versus this black&white sensor, there is one thing to consider.

It has already been mentioned that having no CFA, AA and debayering going on you gain a large resolution advantage (and the samples, to me, really show it).

However, when you use the colour sliders to adjust the black and white conversion from colour, you are losing even more resolution. If you drop the blue channel for instance (to simulate a dark red filter - gives you dramatic skies), you are essentially losing much of the information / resolution those blue pixels would provide.

Try it. Crank down the blue and green sliders in a black and white conversion and then look 100% at the sky, the clouds, the hills and surrounding areas. You will probably notice nasty pixelisation, posterisation and other artifacts.

FWIW I 'get' both sides of the colour vs B&W argument. But a conversion versus a native mono sensor will be leagues apart.

I'm not sure you actually understood what Bluetrain048 said. Subtractive editing is inherently inferior to filtration at the point of capture. I mean, it's fine if Instagram-style photos are your goal, but it's certainly not a superior methodology.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 17:52 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joel Pimenta: Voigtlander Bessa (any) - 700 or 800
Voigtlander 40:1.4 - 400 or 500
Kodak TMAX 400, 800, 1600... 4 or 5

That's a better BW option for a "cheap" rangefinder.

It's a nice option, but I doubt your TMAX is going to look very good at ISO 10,000. Personally I top out at about 1600 in practical terms using HP5+ and stand processing. Past that the grain structure is just too pronounced for my tastes. Although bigger film helps a lot. This is at 1600 with 6x7 and to me the grain seems very fine.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/r_jackson/2144189107/

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 17:49 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

ybizzle: Nothing that a D800 or 5D MKIII couldn't produce...At less than half the cost!

And that's the real subject of most of the comments here. It's like someone saying, "$225,000 for an electron microscope!?!?! It outputs in B&W!!! For $75 the microscopes at my community college output color and you can just convert those to B&W if that's what you want to see!!!"

And it's difficult to explain why that's not the same thing to someone who has no idea what they're talking about. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 17:44 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lupti: Ok, I say take an ordinary DSLR, set it to B/W and take the same shots. I doubt that most people can distinguish them from the Leica shots if not told from what camera they are. Really. I also would go as far as taking an ordinary P&S with B/W mode and compare them with these.
I don´t see the point of this camera aside from being a new toy for people with too much money. I also never understood what´s so great about the Leica system, the cameras and lenses cost megabucks for what reason? Handmade in Germany, a red dot? But the parts are so expensive there isn´t money anmyore for a higher resolution display? Okay...there are still too much people with too much money.
And no, there is no envy at all.
Now I think some people will tell me I´m trolling(I´m not) or that I don´t understand the special art of photographing with a Leica, but really, I couldn´t care less.

@Petka I'm not sure you really understand how much detriment a Bayer array does to an image. In the name of capturing color about half the image is interpolated data. And of course you sprinkle clumps of chroma noise on top of that. You can oversample and get similar results, but that means you'd really need the 36 megapixels of the D800 to yield a "Leica-like" 18 megapixel B&W image.

Fake B&W through processing is fine for people who don't understand the process of monochrome capture, but it's certainly not a superior process. Any more than Instagram is superior to actually cross-processing film. It's faster and you can make changes that would be harder to make with chemistry, but the final result isn't going to fool a real photographer.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 17:33 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

ybizzle: Nothing that a D800 or 5D MKIII couldn't produce...At less than half the cost!

You basically need twice the resolution of the Leica to get comparable sharpness, so the D800 could probably do a passable job of mimicry (while being much heavier with inferior wide-angle optics and generating much larger files). The 5D III just doesn't have the resolution to match a non-Bayer M9.

This is a very compact camera with no Bayer array. It's a very significant thing for people who shoot B&W. For others it won't be as significant.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 17:27 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

Petka: Have you good people never used the B&W conversion function in newer versions of PS or Lightroom? It is not just that you pull the saturation slider to the left and get a B&W photo. In Lightroom 4, for example, there are 8 sliders for different colors with which you control how those colors appear on the B&W output. That gives the same flexibility as having an infinite number of color filters to put on in front of this monochrome camera when shooting, except that you can do it in the privacy of your own home, and experiment and make different looking B&W prints from the same file. All this flexibility and creative possibility is lost with this Leica. Leica know this, but hopes and prays that the people getting this camera do not know it.

I hope somebody makes an honest comparison with D800 and this Monochrom showing this simple fact how much creative and quality adjustment possibilities are lost when using a monochrome sensor compared to color RAW and B&W conversion in post.

When you debayer an image you're interpolating information. Avoiding that is the reason Foveon fanatics are willing to disregard all the shortcomings of their sensor. A monochrome sensor is the "purest" form of digital capture. Everything that you see in the final photo is what the sensor saw, not some kind of interpolation. That also means that you don't get noise "clumping" the way you do with a color sensor. I love seeing these simulated B&W shots that still have (now monochrome) chroma clumps.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 15:38 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

bigdaddave: 1930's throwback intentionally crippled and they want how much for it?

If I ever see someone with one of these I will make sure I laugh at them

Because the physical filters actually remove part of the spectrum of light from what's striking the sensor and physically changes the way the camera is seeing light. It's not a simulation of what that might look like. It's an actual physical change in the capture. And you don't need to stack 8 filters. If you did the result would be a mess. You commit to a look based on what you're shooting. Once you learn something about B$W photography that choice will probably seem pretty simple to you.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 15:29 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

bigdaddave: 1930's throwback intentionally crippled and they want how much for it?

If I ever see someone with one of these I will make sure I laugh at them

Actually, that's a huge advantage because the Bayer array used to capture that color information limits the resolution being captured by the sensor as well as imposing a penalty on how much light makes it to the sensor.

Now you can properly capture the detail in the scene with no interpolated data from a Debayering process and you can learn to use your filters again. They do a much better job than "virtual" filters in Photoshop, anyway. And really, a yellow, red, orange, blue and green filter added to your case still won't make the case as heavy as the extra weight of a DSLR.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 06:20 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

Petka: Have you good people never used the B&W conversion function in newer versions of PS or Lightroom? It is not just that you pull the saturation slider to the left and get a B&W photo. In Lightroom 4, for example, there are 8 sliders for different colors with which you control how those colors appear on the B&W output. That gives the same flexibility as having an infinite number of color filters to put on in front of this monochrome camera when shooting, except that you can do it in the privacy of your own home, and experiment and make different looking B&W prints from the same file. All this flexibility and creative possibility is lost with this Leica. Leica know this, but hopes and prays that the people getting this camera do not know it.

I hope somebody makes an honest comparison with D800 and this Monochrom showing this simple fact how much creative and quality adjustment possibilities are lost when using a monochrome sensor compared to color RAW and B&W conversion in post.

And monochrome conversion in PS or Lightroom will remove the Bayer array and the AA filter in your camera retroactively so you capture extra resolution?

This is a camera people will have to approach like B&W film with contrast filters and an eye for the kind of light illuminating the scene. People who don't take photography that seriously aren't going to have any idea how to properly use a camera like this.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 06:16 UTC
On Leica M-Monochrom preview (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

Guidenet: I too am a bit underwhelmed. Most monochrome I see these days are failed color images where the photographer chose to go b&w in an attempt to be artsy, to same the failed image. I even see it here in critiques where people tell the photographer to try the same image converted to monochrome.

We look at some of the old greats like Ansel Adams and point at wonderful images, but that was the best medium available in those days. As technology improved, Adams moved forward. Today I believe he'd be shooting digital color and use Photoshop CS5.

I think it can be fun and rewarding to shoot B&W, and I too do these days, but it's with film and multi contrast paper printed high contrast. For those who still want great B&W, there you have it for much less money than this baby and you're not just trying to be artsy. For $7000, you can buy a complete darkroom, a nice 4x5 field camera & lens along with most everything else needed to really do B&W right. The image was meant that way from the start.

Kind of sad to see how little respect so many people have for monochrome capture. There are a lot of things you can do with monochrome that don't really work in color. Deep focus shots don't really work as well in color, for example. And of course B&W emphasizes lines in a way that color doesn't, so certain kinds of composition pop in B&W that don't really have the same appeal in color.

The other thing about this camera in particular is that it's probably going to be able to capture close to as much detail as a D800, despite having less resolution as a result of losing the Bayer array.

Honestly, what could be more appealing than a monochrome digital Leica? It makes such perfect sense. If I could afford one I'd already have one pre-ordered.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2012 at 06:07 UTC
Total: 73, showing: 21 – 40
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