falconeyes

falconeyes

Lives in Germany Germany
Has a website at falklumo.blogspot.com
Joined on Apr 28, 2008

Comments

Total: 171, showing: 41 – 60
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On Samsung announces curved Galaxy Round post (144 comments in total)
In reply to:

vladimir vanek: what the...? I mean, what's wrong with the world today? Do we need hundreds of phone models in every tenth of inch of screen diagonal? flat, round, black, red, white, blue, with this and that OS, with all sorts of resolutions. one with LED flash, another one with dual LED, and a third one with bi-color dual LED. oh yes, and a xenon of course. those with 8 mpix, 10 mpix, 13 mpix, a water resistant one, crush resistant, made of plastic, made of metals, made of glass... And most importantly, a new one every few months? why don't they make a flawless design, say in 5 different specs and that's it? cooperation instead of competition? and focus on more important things, like saving the planet, feeding people and living happy lives without all those twitters and facebooks even in our bedrooms? sorry for my essay, I'm just tired of this neverending competition that brings nothing but pulling out some money out of everyone's pocket as often as possible.

Vladimir may be right. But the cure is more challenging tasks to direct talent and capital towards. The current redundancy is a sign that we are running low on vision or goals. Or on mechanisms to fund visions or goals. It used to be a political task, now it is investment banking.

Having said this, I think Samsung's flexible display technology is a break through. Not the phone, but the technology behind.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 9, 2013 at 23:34 UTC

Now, Jony brought to cameras what he brought to iOS. Jony, please, focus with what you are great at: designing computer hardware.

In an interview ( http://www.theverge.com/2013/9/19/4748572/apple-jony-ive-ios-7-interview ) Jony describes his philosophy ("objects whose forms don't hint at what they do"). And that's the problem, both for a UI and for tools: their forms SHOULD hint at what it does ...

And a camera is a tool.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 9, 2013 at 14:53 UTC as 94th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

falconeyes: From the image, the lens would be no more than a 1.8mm aperture. Which is only half the 3.3mm of the Nokia 808's lens, the current smartphone class leader. Therefore, this new device can only capture 1/4 the light of the class leader and won't be that interesting.

F-number is irrelevant for cross-system evaluations. Physical lens diameter is the only parameter left in any equation.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 8, 2013 at 21:38 UTC

From the image, the lens would be no more than a 1.8mm aperture. Which is only half the 3.3mm of the Nokia 808's lens, the current smartphone class leader. Therefore, this new device can only capture 1/4 the light of the class leader and won't be that interesting.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 7, 2013 at 19:20 UTC as 12th comment | 3 replies
On ZEISS announces 'no compromise' Otus 55mm F1.4 news story (507 comments in total)
In reply to:

misha marinsky4: I read diglloyd's review.

Here's my request: DPR has a double blind print test, Zeiss vs Sigma. 11x14, four apertures: 1.4, 5.6, 8, 16.

Would the Zeiss do better than 50/50, which is random?

Comments?

I*ve test shot the Zeiss lens at Photokina. In the corners at F/1.4, the difference is shockingly large. The problem actually is to focus at F/1.4 exactly enough to deploy all this sharpness.

I look at this lens as a tool turning a D800E into an MF camera equivalent. OTOH, MF cameras are AF typically ...

Direct link | Posted on Oct 7, 2013 at 17:21 UTC
On Fashion photography with the 41MP Nokia Lumia 1020 news story (123 comments in total)
In reply to:

InTheMist: Watch the video. Much better images than those overprocessed (hiding faults?) examples here.

It's worth noting that the video shows thousands of dollars of studio lighting equipment used. No wonder they're good.

Very good quality can be produced with the 808 and fairly affordable studio equipment. I wonder why they didn't share high rez samples like I did (cf. my post below). I hear the 808 has better IQ than the 1020 and it might have shown ...

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2013 at 11:46 UTC
On Fashion photography with the 41MP Nokia Lumia 1020 news story (123 comments in total)

This is the comment I left on Nokia's blog:

Thanks for the article. But note that I already reported about PureView studio photography about a year ago:

-> http://falklumo.blogspot.de/2012/07/the-icamera-nokia-808-pureview-part-ii.html

It includes a technique to properly sync the PureView with studio flashes. And it includes a full size sample image. Where are the full size samples from THIS article btw?

Nice article otherwise.
Kind regards Falk

P.S.
If you wonder if they knew about the article... it is the seventh hit if you search for: pureview studio

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2013 at 09:13 UTC as 30th comment
On Can computer corrections make simple lenses look good? news story (162 comments in total)

Mathematically, deconvolution is an unstable operator. Therefore, expect no wonders.

It is most useful with a "perfect" convoluted input signal, i.e., without any noise.

Therefore, DPR's assumption that it may be most useful with smartphones lacks a certain degree of understanding.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 30, 2013 at 23:38 UTC as 53rd comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

falconeyes: 0.01 lux is -8 EV.

I heavily doubt it was this dark, as it would correspond be about a moonless starry night. But the fireflies then would illuminate the scenery (or their direct surrounding at least) as main light source and I didn't notice the effect in the video.

Anyway, while dark, -8 EV corresponds to (F/1.4, 1/24s) ISO 1,200,000. I saw extreme noise at 640px web resolution. Scaling web resolution to full 24 MP resolution, the would be the screen pixel noise (24MP) at ISO 14,000. I'd say a normal full frame 24MP dSLR doesn't have this much pixel noise at ISO 14,000.

Therefore, I conclude that the demo shown by Canon is technically lame, more of a marketing gig than anything else.

I was only wondering if it really was pitch black dark as they claimed. Because fire flies then actually illuminate a scene, I have seen it with my own eyes. But in my actual argument, this plays no role, I assumed 0.01lx to be a true assertion.

It is lame because any full frame dSLR can do this already, in still mode at the same shutter speed. The news is that Canon works around a bug how they produce video. And this IS lame.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 14, 2013 at 20:37 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: Few and large pixels is a very good choice for ultra high ISO work, like this one. But, when there is more light, more pixels gives better IQ. So, if you want few and large pixels or more and smaller pixels is a choice. Do you want to maximise high ISO performance or do you want to maximize low ISO performance.

As I said below, the fact that the pixels are large has nothing to do in this. It is that Canon doesn't throw away any pixels for video in this case as they do in their consumer dSLRs.

Look up sensorgen.info to see that larger pixels gain no extra sensitivity for SLRs.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2013 at 22:40 UTC
In reply to:

falconeyes: This is one possible approach to decent low light capablity in video.

The other approach is to stop the nonsense to subsample sensors in video mode, reading out maybe 1 out of 6 pixels. This is what creates noise and aliasing artefacts in video. Unneccessarily so, as a few cameras (Panasonic, Nokia) show which don't subsample but create a video signal from all pixels. I.e., it is quite feasible.

Therefore, Thumbs Down for Canon to work around a problem they rather should solve.

I mean that the typical SLR from Canon or Nikon only reads out a small subset of pixels (aka subsampling) used to create the video signal from.

This is contrasted by supersampling where all pixels are read and the video is a full downsampling from the frame.

P.S.
Some call it line skipping (esp. for Canon) but line skipping really is a special case of subsampling.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2013 at 22:33 UTC

0.01 lux is -8 EV.

I heavily doubt it was this dark, as it would correspond be about a moonless starry night. But the fireflies then would illuminate the scenery (or their direct surrounding at least) as main light source and I didn't notice the effect in the video.

Anyway, while dark, -8 EV corresponds to (F/1.4, 1/24s) ISO 1,200,000. I saw extreme noise at 640px web resolution. Scaling web resolution to full 24 MP resolution, the would be the screen pixel noise (24MP) at ISO 14,000. I'd say a normal full frame 24MP dSLR doesn't have this much pixel noise at ISO 14,000.

Therefore, I conclude that the demo shown by Canon is technically lame, more of a marketing gig than anything else.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2013 at 22:30 UTC as 46th comment | 7 replies

This is one possible approach to decent low light capablity in video.

The other approach is to stop the nonsense to subsample sensors in video mode, reading out maybe 1 out of 6 pixels. This is what creates noise and aliasing artefacts in video. Unneccessarily so, as a few cameras (Panasonic, Nokia) show which don't subsample but create a video signal from all pixels. I.e., it is quite feasible.

Therefore, Thumbs Down for Canon to work around a problem they rather should solve.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2013 at 21:55 UTC as 52nd comment | 5 replies

I am sorry, but I cannot read the most important bit from the Adobe release, i.e., that the rental fee is fixed for a lifetime. The Adobe FAQ says:
> Customers who sign up by December 31, 2013 will be able to continue their membership. This price is not a special introductory price for your first year only; it is the standard price for this level of membership. But if you cancel your membership in the future, you will not be able to re-join at this special price.

So, Adobe says that $9.99 is the "standard" price. It does NOT say it will never increase. Where did DPR read this most important bit from?

Without, this newest offer is no different from previous ones for PS CC alone.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 9, 2013 at 07:21 UTC as 48th comment
On Nikon unveils tiny Coolpix S02 for 'trendy individuals' news story (63 comments in total)

OMG

Direct link | Posted on Sep 5, 2013 at 08:24 UTC as 40th comment
On Sigma 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM Review preview (319 comments in total)

I would have been keen to learn about AF consistency using the new 70D's dual pixel live view AF.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 2, 2013 at 15:22 UTC as 92nd comment | 13 replies
On Did Sigma design the Olympus M.Zuiko 75mm F1.8? news story (200 comments in total)

There is further evidence not mentioned in the DPR article:

Both designs (the patent according to Egami and Olympus according to their website) use a 10 elements in 9 Groups - 3 ED lenses, 2 HR lenses design.

Where the usage of same ED and HR cannot be pure coincidence (even if similiar software optimizations are applied) and Olympus would then break Sigma's patent anyway.

So yes, this is a Sigma patented design licensed to Olympus.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 29, 2013 at 17:05 UTC as 23rd comment
In reply to:

InTheMist: Hm, the Bigma tested better than I expected.

That's not a criticism of DXOMark, I think it's good testing.

Thats's true.
I always go to the profile tabs to see actual measurements. Both the Score and the PMpix value are to be ignored totally. With this in mind, their tests are a goid resource.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 24, 2013 at 00:30 UTC

Go to the profiles tab for Sigma and Nikkor and compare directly 500/8 vs. 400/8. The difference is whopping. Another example that DxO lens tests are useful, their scores are not.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 24, 2013 at 00:26 UTC as 11th comment
In reply to:

wisep01: Would anyone here at DPReview care to address a perceived contradiction in the test results of this lens--on the D800, it receives both a lower overall and a lower sharpness score than on the D600.

DxO scores are blind for very high resolutions because of their weighting. Go to the profile tabs to really read their results. And keep in mind that D800 pixels are smaller, so similiar acutance means much higher sharpness.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 24, 2013 at 00:23 UTC
Total: 171, showing: 41 – 60
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