SeeRoy

SeeRoy

Lives in United Kingdom south, United Kingdom
Works as a retired
Joined on Jan 13, 2009

Comments

Total: 447, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

R Stacy: Now all we need to do is figure out 19 years of food and water and some willing career participants to send a couple blokes along next time.

Having just watched a program about the manned Mars project, I fall into despair about mankind's limitless stupidity.
We watch our incredibly beautiful planet and its amazing fauna and flora degrading at an ever increasing rate, simply because no-one seems to be able to make the connection between the ruling economic system and its requirement for an ever-increasing number of consumers - Ponzi-style. Population growth: if ever the room contained an elephant... Does anyone seriously imagine that any of the planets in our solar system are capable of sustaining mankind other than in a living hell?
Meanwhile the resources needed to effect a manned mission would generate vastly more useful information if used intelligently, even in space research. I would say that this planet with its exploding population should be the research target.
Of course the exclusion zone at Chernobyl shows that the planet recovers fairly fast in our absence... maybe that's the best we can hope for.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 21, 2015 at 17:00 UTC
On Nikon D810A: An astrophotographer's perspective article (113 comments in total)

This guy does it without one of these cameras.
http://skysurvey.org/blog/2011/2/17/for-all-the-nights-stars

Direct link | Posted on Jul 21, 2015 at 16:41 UTC as 3rd comment
On Nikon D810A: An astrophotographer's perspective article (113 comments in total)
In reply to:

jforkner: I think a few of the posters are missing the point of the criticism given. From the title & the intro, this article was supposed to extol the virtues of the D810A as they pertain to astrophotography. According to Nikon, “Based on the award-winning full-frame D810, the D810A records the brilliant red tones of H-alpha emission nebulae with a level of detail and sharpness, wide dynamic range and rich tonality almost unimaginable until now. Reveal the faintest celestial objects with exposures up to 15 minutes long; and noise-free performance at ISO levels as high as 12,800 (expandable to 51,000).”

While the included photographs are nice, they do nothing to demonstrate how this new camera is better at capturing the nebulae referenced in the intro or Nikon’s description of the camera. Nor do they reveal anything with a long exposure.

The criticism is of the the article’s purported intent, not the photographs themselves.

Stellar performer? Astronomical price?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 21, 2015 at 16:27 UTC
On The big beast: hands on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 article (1225 comments in total)

" 100-300mm F4-5.6 will not be compatible with the system"
How very considerate of Panasonic toward their existing customers. I own this lens so I'll be sticking with Olympus, thanks.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 19, 2015 at 12:54 UTC as 53rd comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

SeeRoy: The EU primarily exists for the benefit of Big Capital. There may be some real benefits for some countries (like being able to **** off to a previously civilised country, in order to reap the benefits of centuries of social development) but primarily it's about ready access to markets and suppression of wages (for the working classes only, obviously) in order to maximise corporate profits.
For most of us, especially in Britain, it's the absolute worst thing that has happened since WW2. At least in WW2 we managed to escape being invaded.
This sort of legislation is just one more example amongst many.
Let's hope the Greeks initiate stage 1 of the EU's disintegration. Stage 2 should be Britain's exit.
For decades I supported the EU idea - but I've seen the consequences.

Whatever the bill in question contains - I certainly haven't bothered reading it - it's just one more example of micro-management by a huge, self-perpetuating bureaucracy. Which bought us, for a single idiotic example, a ban on vacuum cleaners > 1600 W on the justification of "sustainability" or "climate change". We miss most of this stuff as it gets passed into legislation without any exposure to the citizens of the countries it affects.
There are multitudes of similar crazy policies being implemented.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 4, 2015 at 17:58 UTC
In reply to:

RunningTurtle: This whole pan 'EU' nanny thing has turned into quite a monster. I'm surprised how Europeans can put up with so many bizarre and silly laws interferring with their lives.

The reaction against the EU, certainly here in Britain amongst many ordinary citizens, is distinctly hostile. But the interests who want to maintain the status quo have bamboozled and terrified the public. Any attempt to point out the negative consequences of EU membership is met, typically, by accusations of "racism" - an accusation designed to terminate further rational discussion. Consequently many people are frightened to utter any overt criticism.
Now, in advance of the referendum the public schoolboys who constitute our current government (which wouldn't look out of place in the 18th C) are about to engage in a frightener campaign to demonstrate that exiting the EU would result in there being no food, or jobs. Unfortunately the public at large, narcotised by consumerism, sport and celebrity culture (by courtesy of the same interests who benefit from the EU) are almost certain to vote to stay in. We'll have to hope that chaos elsewhere continues the rot which started in Greece.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 4, 2015 at 17:50 UTC
In reply to:

SeeRoy: The EU primarily exists for the benefit of Big Capital. There may be some real benefits for some countries (like being able to **** off to a previously civilised country, in order to reap the benefits of centuries of social development) but primarily it's about ready access to markets and suppression of wages (for the working classes only, obviously) in order to maximise corporate profits.
For most of us, especially in Britain, it's the absolute worst thing that has happened since WW2. At least in WW2 we managed to escape being invaded.
This sort of legislation is just one more example amongst many.
Let's hope the Greeks initiate stage 1 of the EU's disintegration. Stage 2 should be Britain's exit.
For decades I supported the EU idea - but I've seen the consequences.

"Does a lot of good work..."
And Mussolini made Italian trains run on time.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 4, 2015 at 17:40 UTC

The EU primarily exists for the benefit of Big Capital. There may be some real benefits for some countries (like being able to **** off to a previously civilised country, in order to reap the benefits of centuries of social development) but primarily it's about ready access to markets and suppression of wages (for the working classes only, obviously) in order to maximise corporate profits.
For most of us, especially in Britain, it's the absolute worst thing that has happened since WW2. At least in WW2 we managed to escape being invaded.
This sort of legislation is just one more example amongst many.
Let's hope the Greeks initiate stage 1 of the EU's disintegration. Stage 2 should be Britain's exit.
For decades I supported the EU idea - but I've seen the consequences.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 4, 2015 at 17:04 UTC as 157th comment | 7 replies

14mm... macro.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2015 at 09:00 UTC as 7th comment
In reply to:

Johannes Zander: And what did he play?

I imagine Dmitri Shostakovich would be tempted to name the piece "A Russian composer's kazoo to justified criticism." A perfect response to accusations of bourgeois formalism. Putin'd probably still walk out in the interval though.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 6, 2015 at 11:56 UTC

As with so many high end consumer devices, the justification for this product has little to do with either functionality or aesthetics. It relies on the desire of people with an surfeit of funds to indulge their own self-image. Like every other camera currently on sale it'll be gathering dust on a shelf within - let's be generous - 10 years.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 3, 2015 at 08:21 UTC as 73rd comment
In reply to:

SeeRoy: "Never give a sucker an even break"
W.C. Fields

"Non-related"?

Direct link | Posted on May 22, 2015 at 08:53 UTC

"Never give a sucker an even break"
W.C. Fields

Direct link | Posted on May 21, 2015 at 17:09 UTC as 15th comment | 3 replies

As the owner of an EM5 (I guess we have to retrospectively assign it a "MK1" label) this sort of nonsensical product says a great deal about Olympus, and indeed the entire camera business. If the MK2 itself is anything like the MK1 then addressing the cosmetics with a "limited edition" - for people stupid enough to care how the top plate looks - whilst failing to address the fact that the camera has only two good attributes embedded in a host of failings, is to treat the consumers as fools: probably correctly.
1) The files are excellent, other things being equal.
2) The camera is small and light.
However the general handling, firmware and ergonomics are pitifully bad.
There's also the fact that in an industry where the replacement cycle is engineered to a frequency of about 18 months, the idea of "collectability" (as in film era hardware) is just a joke.

Direct link | Posted on May 14, 2015 at 09:11 UTC as 4th comment | 5 replies
On Hands-on with new Olympus PRO 8mm and 7-14mm lenses article (285 comments in total)
In reply to:

SeeRoy: The 8mm FE is announced at $999. Currently the Samyang MF 7.5mm 2.8 FE is available for less than £200. I have the Samyang and it's excellent. It should be pretty obvious that if there's one lens that doesn't really need AF, it's an FE.
Save yourselves lots of money unless you're planning to shoot goodness knows what, with an FE, in the rain.

Yep, it's 3.5.Me culpa. Personally I don't find much use for FEs except for VR pano creation where I want maximum DOF so I usually shoot at equivalent F8. I'm amazed that people find many uses for FEs other than this, so all the other criteria pass over my head. I own the Nikkor 10.5 and the 16mm. The 10.5 is the best of the three in terms of flare.

Direct link | Posted on May 12, 2015 at 17:19 UTC
On Hands-on with new Olympus PRO 8mm and 7-14mm lenses article (285 comments in total)

The 8mm FE is announced at $999. Currently the Samyang MF 7.5mm 2.8 FE is available for less than £200. I have the Samyang and it's excellent. It should be pretty obvious that if there's one lens that doesn't really need AF, it's an FE.
Save yourselves lots of money unless you're planning to shoot goodness knows what, with an FE, in the rain.

Direct link | Posted on May 12, 2015 at 06:54 UTC as 57th comment | 5 replies
On Field Test: Sigma 19mm, 30mm and 60mm F2.8 DN lenses article (161 comments in total)

These are daft focal lengths for MFT application since they more or less duplicate existing, reasonably priced equivalents (in many cases faster) from other brands - notably Olympus and Panasonic themselves.
Why "deceptively pleasing"? Are they in reality repulsive? Do explain.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2015 at 19:02 UTC as 72nd comment | 24 replies

One of the more expensive torches (aka flashlights) I've seen advertised today. Still...
"Never give a sucker an even break"
W.C. Fields

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2015 at 17:40 UTC as 2nd comment

"Never give a sucker an even break"
W.C. Fields

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2015 at 17:35 UTC as 7th comment
On Massive $33,500 2450mm f/8 NASA lens surfaces on eBay article (235 comments in total)
In reply to:

Papi61: "capable of firing off 125 6x6 frames per second"

What kind of magazine would that require for a 10-second burst? Not to mention a whole gallon of lubricating oil for the entire system to not grind to a halt after 2 seconds...

Whale oil be f*cked. Sustainable whales I trust?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 29, 2015 at 08:33 UTC
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