pcworth

pcworth

Lives in United States Houghton, MI, United States
Works as a Chemistry Professor
Joined on Oct 25, 2011
About me:

Love: The outdoors, gardening, ice skating, quadline and inline skating, cycling, skiing, snowboarding. Always looking for the perfect Disney vacation camera!

Comments

Total: 77, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (563 comments in total)
In reply to:

Anastigmat: Mirrorless cameras are not any smaller than DSLR cameras as a system. Because of the shorter lens flange to sensor distance, telephoto lenses are actually longer because whatever length is reduced fro the camera has to be added to the lens. So, people who carry more than 1 telephoto lens will actually see an increase in size and weight. Size and weight of wide angle lenses can theoretically be reduced, but only if a wide angle is re-designed to take advantage of the shorter lens flange to sensor distance. Unfortunately, many wide angles still use the reverse telephoto design, either because it is an existing design done for DSLR cameras originally, or it is designed that way to minimize vignetting, or the fall off of light at the corners. Therefore if size and weight are of paramount importance, it is better to buy a mirrorless that has a small sensor AND also lenses that are designed from scratch to fit that sensor size.

I imagine this depends on whether you are using full frame mirrorless, or Micro Four Thirds. The MFT lenses are much much smaller than my Canon EF and EF-S lenses.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2016 at 22:46 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (563 comments in total)
In reply to:

justmeMN: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera?

Because you're a vampire, and vampires don't like mirrors.

Perhaps the most sensible comment yet! :-)

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2016 at 22:44 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (563 comments in total)
In reply to:

xlynx9: Mirrorless is where most of the innovation is taking place. 5 axis stabilisation, advanced wifi and social connectivity, face tracking, electronic shutter, prime lenses which are fast, sharp and affordable, 3D lenses, in-camera: art filters; sweep panorama; focus & exposure stacking; distortion & chromatic aberration correction, larger & brighter viewfinders. This innovation will continue because live view enables greater scene awareness and the software will only get more intelligent.

While Xlynx9's statements are a bit sweeping, they are not too far off. In just the week or so I've had my used OMD, I have been amazed by its capabilities. It probably won't replace my 7DMkII right now, but it feels every bit as modern as the newer Canon. Technology aside, what struck me most about this little camera is how much fun it is to carry and use. That is really important.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2016 at 22:40 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (563 comments in total)
In reply to:

Class A: Some good points made, but I find the article is skewed towards mirrorless by omitting a number of disadvantages:

1. The camera body of a MILC body is typically smaller but adding a lens with a speed comparable to that used on a DSLR, the overall size advantage is not big. As a matter of fact, for fast / long lenses the small MILC body is an inadequate match to the lens' size and weight.

The argument that most MILC lenses are optimised for their format has limited weight, as lens size / weight is typically dominated by the lens speed, i.e., more closely related to the size of the front element rather than the size of the format projected.

2. A DSLR only turns on the sensor when needed. A MILC, on the other hand, needs to power it for composition, metering, and focusing as well which should result in a higher average sensor temperature, adding to noise in images.

The Olympus 40-150 f/2.8 weights about 27 ounces, while the Canon 70-200 f/2.8 weight about 86 ounces. I own the latter, and it is a big heavy lens. A superb lens, but paired with my 7D MkII and grip it is a beast. I just bought a used OMD E-M10 and was shocked by how small it really is. I picked it mainly because it reminded me of the old OM-1 and OM-10 I owned in my teens and am really looking forward to taking it out for a spot of City shooting with the new Rokinon 7.5 I just ordered.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2016 at 22:32 UTC

Since they did not change the sensor, and I don't care about 4K video, are there many compelling reasons to upgrade from my FZ200 at this point?

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2016 at 14:05 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply

I tried Lightroom, but could not get my head around the workflow (or lack of). The closest I have found in terms of workflow are Capture One and Aftershot Pro. However, Capture One has a pretty ugly interface and Aftershot Pro have a really buggy interface.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2015 at 23:31 UTC as 138th comment | 1 reply
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1593 comments in total)

Hmmm, I'm not sure I understand what is wrong with thinking about the future of your equipment. If you are thinking about moving to full frame, and a full frame lens is available that covers your current crop frame needs, I would argue it makes more financial sense to purchase that. I would also argue that if there is no problem with a 24-70 f/2.8 because you can always buy a 10-24 zoom to cover that lower end, if you have a desire for such wide angles.

I purchased a Canon EF 70-200 IS f/2.8 for use on my T4i because I needed the f/2.8 and the zoom range for indoor sport photography.

I did not realize that Nikon full frame cameras can use crop frame lenses! Very cool! Why doesn't Canon allow that?

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2015 at 20:40 UTC as 69th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Canon 70D OR 760D Rebel T6: What is better 760D or 70D for someone who aspires to become a pro?
Still have no answer! :/

Neither, get a Nikon D750! I borrowed one from a friend this weekend to shoot a skating show and it was a lot of fun to use.

My own camera is a T4i and I've been looking to upgrade, so I'm excited to see what the 760D offers because I see it has some nice features.

The problem I have with Canon right now is that the T6s and 70d are essentially the same thing. Then they have the 6D, which is had a superior sensor, but older technology, and then there is the 5D series. There is nothing in between the 6D and the 5D, which is what I want and why I was so excited by the Nikon D750.

Link | Posted on Feb 26, 2015 at 03:17 UTC

I am really excited by the small LCD, I've worked with a couple of cameras that have it and prefer to just tilt the top of the camera toward me rather than have to mess with the tilting screen on the back.

Link | Posted on Feb 26, 2015 at 03:02 UTC as 154th comment
On article Canon 7D mirror box filmed at 10,000fps (175 comments in total)

My old Olympus OM-1 had a horizontal shutter that looked fabric. I wonder how much the orientation (vertical vs horizontal) impacts the final image?

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2015 at 22:07 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 Review (896 comments in total)
In reply to:

pcworth: Does this camera really have lower noise/higher image quality than the Canon T4i at high ISO?

I currently use the FZ200 for my general travel camera and a T4i+70-200 f/2.8 for photographing figure skating friends. This seems like an interesting alternative, at least for the FZ200, but I am skeptical about the noise when shooting at 800+ ISO (often 1600) given the difference one stop slower aperture at 200mm on this camera compared to the Canon.

Ooops! Yep, wouldn't we all want a 7-200 f/2.8, but I was talking about my 70-200. :-)

Link | Posted on Aug 17, 2014 at 00:00 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 Review (896 comments in total)
In reply to:

pcworth: Does this camera really have lower noise/higher image quality than the Canon T4i at high ISO?

I currently use the FZ200 for my general travel camera and a T4i+70-200 f/2.8 for photographing figure skating friends. This seems like an interesting alternative, at least for the FZ200, but I am skeptical about the noise when shooting at 800+ ISO (often 1600) given the difference one stop slower aperture at 200mm on this camera compared to the Canon.

I'm kind of thinking along the same lines as minzaw. If the image quality of this camera is an improvement over the canon, I would have the best of both worlds.

I was just kind of surprised that it would be better than an APS-C sensor.

I agree with Francis, that comparing lenses is tough, but when you are photographing figure skaters in an ice rink, you are at the mercy of available light. In reality, what I should do is get a full frame sensor, but I like how the APS-C gives me a greater "reach" with the 7-200.

Just thinking out loud really.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2014 at 19:46 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 Review (896 comments in total)

Does this camera really have lower noise/higher image quality than the Canon T4i at high ISO?

I currently use the FZ200 for my general travel camera and a T4i+70-200 f/2.8 for photographing figure skating friends. This seems like an interesting alternative, at least for the FZ200, but I am skeptical about the noise when shooting at 800+ ISO (often 1600) given the difference one stop slower aperture at 200mm on this camera compared to the Canon.

Link | Posted on Jul 29, 2014 at 18:14 UTC as 137th comment | 8 replies
On article Kodak Pixpro S-1 First Impressions Review (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

Artpt: Agreed with other comments on the industry milestone of three companies offering a mix of lenses and bodies in a common format!....a win for consumer choice.

Brand loyalists may not see the benefit in cross competition among the M43 products, but the exchange of common format opens up an entire industry to innovate on other technological aspects....

Pros already use this model to manage multiple aspects of their work but within their camera brand.

Another thought to consider is how fast a company can innovate a product if the R&D works around a known format over innovating the entire format (lenses, bodies, etc). The legacy costs do eat away at budgets and limit creativity.

"Innovation of Android devices over Apple" really depends on your definition of "innovation." If "innovation" is to stick any random technology on to a device regardless of value, then sure. However, I am not sure that is what innovation is really about. Apple is a company that seems to take its time evaluating what works in the market, and what does not.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2014 at 13:32 UTC

The camera is definitely a lot more compact than the GoPro, but doesn't the fact that it is tethered to the battery pack/storage device create a significant tangle hazard to deal with?

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2014 at 13:23 UTC as 2nd comment
On article A GoPro Hero's journey into a dishwasher (167 comments in total)

Whole lot of grumpy people on here today! :-)

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2014 at 13:18 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
On article Lytro Illum in the hands of five leading photographers (164 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: It would be better if Lytro gave DPReview a beta body with beta software and DPReview played with both for month.

Instead we're getting independently created sales brochures from the company.

I saw one of these beta bodies a few weeks ago. Seems more promising than the first, but I could not shoot and then keep files to play with later at home. Not like the software is available to the general public yet.

Why are you so sure this is true? I suppose the reality is that conventional photograph analysis does not really work for this media. For example, how do you analyze the focus of a camera where you can change the focal point after you have captured the image?

Link | Posted on May 20, 2014 at 17:52 UTC
On article Lytro Illum in the hands of five leading photographers (164 comments in total)
In reply to:

InTheMist: I think I finally get this!

It's an interactive photograph with more than one subject possible.

I looked at the gallery and the way to view the images just feels funny so far. If only the photographer could create two (or more) focus points that were automatically moved to and from, that would be a nicer user experience and would better fulfill the photographer's vision. The size of the sensor seems too small to properly appreciate the focus interaction as well.

Most of us are so conditioned to think in terms of "prints" that our brain struggles with these "photographs," but as the world of digital media continues to grow I feel we will increasingly learn to embrace living images and their vast potential.

Link | Posted on May 20, 2014 at 17:48 UTC
On article Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 Review (499 comments in total)
In reply to:

pedroboe100: I don't get it. It's bulky and expensive. Why would someone choose this over a Pentax K5, Olympus EM1, Pana GH3, with a Tamron superzoom lens?

Try putting an equivalent f/2.8 lens on any of those cameras and see how bulky they are.

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2014 at 22:22 UTC
On article Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 Review (499 comments in total)

@mosc I think you need to check your numbers because this camera has an f/2.8 lens across the range. You cannot compare a camera with a kit lens to a camera with an f/2.8 lens.

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2014 at 22:21 UTC as 43rd comment | 1 reply
Total: 77, showing: 1 – 20
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