fad

fad

Lives in United States NYC, NY, United States
Works as a Investor/Scholar-poet
Joined on Oct 2, 2005
About me:

Equipment:
Nikon D3s, D4, D800, Fuji X100
14-24, 24-70, 70-200/2.8 zooms
35/2D, 50/1.8D&G, 85/1.4G, 135/2D,
24-120/4 VR, 24-85G, 28-300G

Caonon 5d, 1ds mk3
70-200 2.8 IS
70-200/4 IS
70-300 DO IS
24-105/4
16-35/2.8 II

35/2
50/1.4
85/1.2 II
200/2.8

Comments

Total: 76, showing: 21 – 40
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On Walker Evans' iconic 'American Photographs' turns 75 article (39 comments in total)
In reply to:

reginalddwight: Evans' work for the Resettlement Administration in the 1930s represent the pinnacle of his career as a documentary photographer.

There are several historical photographs that best represent the Great Depression.

In addition to arguably the most iconic of the era, "Migrant Mother" by Dorothea Lange, the portrait of Allie Mae Burroughs by Evans superbly captures the raw anguish and uncertainty of the times.

.

These things happen. Berenice Abbott stood across the street from my townhouse in Manhattan, and carefully framed a shot that excluded it. When I saw the image, I realized that I had looked on that scene every day for years and not realized its potential, I eventually took a better shot than she did, with modern equipment and processing:

http://collections-static-2.mcny.org/Doc/MNY/Media/TR3/2/3/8/4/MNY76129.jpg

Evans was teaching at the college I went to, but I was too ignorant to care about who he was, a mere photographer. His first published images were in an early edition of Hart Crane's poem, The Bridge. Crane started writing the poem, and being friends with Evans, while living on my block, which was a notable slum south of Greenwich Village.

Evans was important also for his support of other photographers, getting people like Robert Frank a Guggenheim so he could produce his lamentable "The Americans."

Direct link | Posted on Aug 13, 2013 at 08:30 UTC
On Walker Evans' iconic 'American Photographs' turns 75 article (39 comments in total)
In reply to:

bigdaddave: The picture of the woman is a strong picture, the others are really just 'documentary' shots of the era in which they lived and nothing special at all

It helps to buy the book. Evans' is a serious man, with a tragic vision of great depth.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 13, 2013 at 08:24 UTC
In reply to:

fad: Virginia Postrel put it well:

Ultimately, the debate about choice is not about markets but about character. Liberty and responsibility really do go together; it’s not just a platitude. The more freedom we have to control our lives, the more responsibility we have for how they turn out. In a world of constraints, learning to be happy with what you’re given is a virtue. In a world of choices, virtue comes from learning to make commitments without regrets. And commitment, in turn, requires self-confidence and self-knowledge.

“We are free to be the authors of our lives,” says Schwartz, “but we don’t know exactly what kind of lives we want to ‘write.’” Maturity lies in deciding just that.

Well, the behavior you're describing (of which many of us are guilty) is a betrayal of our commitment to photographic excellence.

But although Postrel expresses herself in existential terms, the kinds of commitment we make are both big and small. A camera is an extension of your eye, which is part of your brain, and also of your body. You should pay attention to it, as well as to your product. That is what freedom allows, and requires. In a few years, as the digital revolution matures, people will be paying less attention to equipment.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 21:50 UTC
In reply to:

deleted-13120401: Pretty sure all you need to be a 'street photographer' is to call yourself a street photographer. Better yet, International Street Photographer.

His point is that International Street Photographer is silly and pretentious.

It's like Austin Powers calling himself "International Man of Mystery."

When I was in finance, International Finance was about doing finance in different currencies, customs, languages and legal systems. It made sense to make it a specialty. What's different about International Street Photography?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 03:46 UTC

Virginia Postrel put it well:

Ultimately, the debate about choice is not about markets but about character. Liberty and responsibility really do go together; it’s not just a platitude. The more freedom we have to control our lives, the more responsibility we have for how they turn out. In a world of constraints, learning to be happy with what you’re given is a virtue. In a world of choices, virtue comes from learning to make commitments without regrets. And commitment, in turn, requires self-confidence and self-knowledge.

“We are free to be the authors of our lives,” says Schwartz, “but we don’t know exactly what kind of lives we want to ‘write.’” Maturity lies in deciding just that.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 00:29 UTC as 78th comment | 3 replies

Choice theory does not meet the test of reasonableness. People are not clamoring for dpr to do fewer reviews, nor for Canon to make fewer cameras, nor for there to be fewer manufacturers or formats. I could probably take similar street shots with any camera every made (up to a point), but like many others I await the ILC FF mirrorless camera with interest.

My son took me to a store on a block I grew up on that had hundreds of craft beers. We had a very pleasant time, and the people who spent 20 minutes deciding what to buy did not look unhappy, but fulfilled. Our whole economy is based on the individual being free to choose, and to choose responsibly based on self-knowledge.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 00:28 UTC as 79th comment | 1 reply

35mm is not for everyone. Cartier-Bresson, who used it when needed, pointed out that there is the temptation to have elements that are out of focus and distorted and, most damningly, it is very difficult to exclude extraneous elements. I think beginners should not be directed toward that focal length. It will only frustrate them.

It's easy to take a decent 35mm that's just a tele or normal shot, in effect, with the main elements parallel to the sensor. It is very hard to take a good picture that is true wide angel, with perspective effects and effective use of 3D space and no extraneous elements.

Mr Kim's work is a good example of wide angle abuse for cheap effects. It's mostly street portraiture, which is perhaps the easiest form of SP. Doing non-environmental portraits with a 35mm or wider lens has a little too much of gimmickry and a little too little of true photographic artistry.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 00:07 UTC as 82nd comment

There is no perfect buying decision. I am a maximizer, and I know this and take it into account. That's the problem with social science, it treats people as interchangeable objects, not beings with free will and souls. So it will always be superficial.

There is no perfect street photography camera. However, when Kim says that high iso is not important, he should speak for himself. I often shoot in the evening and at night. Even in a bright sunny day you might want to shoot in a dark space you come across. That is one of the main reasons I shoot with large professional FF cameras. Another is cropping. Another is that since the environment is not controlled, a great deal of PP manipulation can be required. Also most cities are less challening that NYC, so sleepier cameras can be less of a handicap.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 00:00 UTC as 83rd comment
On DPReview launches GearShop article (327 comments in total)

GearShop may be a symptom of how hard it is for many to profit from the internet.

Dpr attracts millions of visitors, who pay nothing for the privilege.

Amazon knows how much traffic comes from dpr, and it may not be enough to justify what the dpreview staff wishes to do.

This is a problem that commercial internet sites have to deal with -how to monetize their success.

Since Gearshop provides no real benefit for the customer, I don't see how it can succeed.

Perhaps dpreview should communicate this to its members in an honest and straightforward fashion, simply say: buying from us is like buying from Amazon, but it supports the site you enjoy and rely on.

Even better, if it benefits them, and doesn't hurt us users, they could ask that we purchase gear from Amazon using a link from dpreview.

Ultimately, the Internet needs a way to charge people insignificant amounts for each access to commercial sites. What I pay for cable is ridiculous, and I use the Internet more..

Direct link | Posted on Jul 19, 2013 at 17:37 UTC as 27th comment | 2 replies
On DPReview launches GearShop article (327 comments in total)
In reply to:

fad: Where are the shipping, return policies and so forth?

What is the value to the consumer of Gear Shop over having a list of recommended products with links to purchasing them on Amazon? Why should we buy from you?

What states do you collect sales tax for?

So there is no benefit to us customers from using Gear Shop over Amazon?

One has to guess it was just set up to increase the paper profitability of the dpreview tentacle within the Amazon octopus, since it does nothing that a list of recommended products would not do as well.

Am I missing any benefit for customers?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 18, 2013 at 14:40 UTC
On DPReview launches GearShop article (327 comments in total)

Where are the shipping, return policies and so forth?

What is the value to the consumer of Gear Shop over having a list of recommended products with links to purchasing them on Amazon? Why should we buy from you?

What states do you collect sales tax for?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 18, 2013 at 03:19 UTC as 82nd comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

xtoph: it is a pretty serious issue, imo.
consider an expensive camera purchase, for the sake of argument, a leica m9. reviews vary wildly, to say the least. but the most troubling part is that some of the problems pointed out in negative reviews are extremely serious issues--which other users don't believe exist.
i've shot 100k+ exposures with an m9, and i can attest to the fact that there are problems with it i have never encountered with any other camera. otoh, there is no real way to decide whether you want to buy one, in spite of those problems, besides using it yourself. (i don't regret mine.)
now i want to buy a replacement. there doesn't appear to be any way to sift through some of the criticisms of the new m240 to determine whether they will be decisive other than, you guessed it, using the camera myself.
normally, the solution is trusted reviewers. but authoritative reviews of both the m8 and m9 failed miserably to expose actual problems-user reports did that.
catch-22.

It's important to realize that our decision making can never be perfect. There is no way to eliminate every risk in a purchase - its performance, suitability, QC, obsolescence, etc.

In the world we live in, we make so many purchase decisions we have to adapt an imperfect heuristic that fits our personality, and hope for the best. Certainty is a chimera.

As an aside, that is why Nikon USA's customer hostile service policies are so self-defeating. Potential customers learn about it, and thus are faced with another uncertainty that has nothing to do with the basic product itself. How can they quantify and evaluate their odds of beings screwed by Nikon?

Products are revised so quickly. Reviews are generally done soon after launch. It is only luck if the reviewer uses the gear the same way you do and considers important what you consider important.

We are very lucky though to have such sources of information, biased and incomplete though they may be.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 15, 2013 at 23:43 UTC
On Forum updates article (68 comments in total)
In reply to:

reginalddwight: At first, I hated the changes. But I was able to change the color scheme back to the classic version.

Now the Forum Updates are "Recommended (just)".

In the Doc&SP forum there is only one thread from the last 2 days.

Street Photography Exchange no longer appears in the all threads view, or any other view. Could it be the header used:

>>> Street Photography eXchange #47 <<<

It is still there, and can be reached through Recent Forum Activity, but it does not show up among the forum threads.

---It works now.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2013 at 19:20 UTC
In reply to:

Peanut88: Be careful as this may have military surveillance applications well favored by the terrorist as it is cheap, good and effective.

Be careful. Not too much details.

AFAIK, cameras are not a terrorist thing.

In an open society, there is no need to snoop to find vulnerabilities.

Direct link | Posted on May 29, 2013 at 17:07 UTC

It's the way that reality is retouched and distorted in the news and editorial parts of the Times that I find more predictable and disturbing.

We met a young woman at a party yesterday who was conspicuously well-dressed. She's from Dallas and plans to revolutionize the fashion industry, in part by moving from the fantasty of women's sizes 4-6-8 (what nonsense) to actual measurements.

So I asked my wife (an accomplished professional and a trained intellectual) if she agreed. I could sense instantly that her heart and mind were in conflict between two completely irreconcilable ideas.

Women will never think like us, but there is hope:

http://blogs.the-american-interest.com/wrm/2013/05/19/frack-chic/

http://www.thegloss.com/2013/05/16/fashion/fatkinis-by-gabifresh-and-swimsuitsforall-bikinis-for-plus-size-women/

Direct link | Posted on May 21, 2013 at 14:43 UTC as 24th comment
On Photoshop CC: Adobe responds to reaction article (1853 comments in total)

No one wants to pay more money, but as a onetime financial analyst I have to ask does anyone think about he value of the time they learn using PS and LR? The cost of books, tutorials and classes? No one "needs" them, and no one can use them without spending time worth much more than the programs to learn them well.

Adobe's problem has always been an extreme example of being worth tons of money to some people and much less to others. It's a real pricing dilemma.

In advanced PS at ICP, we were told that PS gurus who are photographers use at most 1 or 2% of the program, and that no one know all of it.

Adobe did a wonderful thing in creating LR for photographers. But they still have a monster program in PS with a hybrid identity.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2013 at 01:28 UTC as 780th comment | 1 reply

This article does a fine job of subtraction from the sum total of human knowledge and understanding.

We discuss it on Street Photography Exchange a little:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51397142

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51399973

Just be aware that this guy doesn't know what he's talking about. It's a danger of photography that one can navigate it and be all on the surface.

Direct link | Posted on May 4, 2013 at 15:23 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply

The headline is highly misleading. There has been no mystery to unpack for quite a few years. ICP had a major exhibition last year. There is no news in the article that is linked to. Who edits this website? Do they not follow what is going on at ICP?

I don't thank any well-educated person is unaware of the Spanish Civil War and how equally vile both the fascists and the Communists were.

A good friend from college was named after one of the martyrs of the Abraham Lincoln brigade, but by the time I met him, he and his father were dedicated, idealistic anti-communists.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 6, 2013 at 02:00 UTC as 31st comment
On Preview:nikon-coolpix-a (442 comments in total)

Looks like they were afraid to compete head on with fuji and sony.

Posted on Mar 5, 2013 at 07:16 UTC as 170th comment
On New image viewing options for forums article (162 comments in total)
In reply to:

fad: The problem with the "Download Original" button is that it makes it look as if the viewer is being granted permission to download someone else's work, when that usually is not the photographer's intention.

Yes, 'view original' would be much better.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2013 at 03:25 UTC
Total: 76, showing: 21 – 40
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