fad

fad

Lives in United States NYC, NY, United States
Works as a Investor/Scholar-poet
Joined on Oct 2, 2005
About me:

Equipment:
Nikon D750, D810, D4s, D800, Fuji X100
14-24, 24-70, 70-200/2.8 zooms
35/1.8, 50/1.8G, 85/1.4G, 85/1.8G, 135/2D,
24-120/4 VR, 24-85G, 28-300G

Caonon 5d, 1ds mk3
70-200 2.8 IS
70-200/4 IS
70-300 DO IS
24-105/4
16-35/2.8 II

35/2
50/1.4
85/1.2 II
200/2.8

Comments

Total: 82, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
In reply to:

chewdoggydog: Haters hate on what you're doing......critics critique on how you're doing it.

I certainly don't hate you for it. I realize that prejudice and self-promotion is something we all are subject too. But you are being a bald-faced bigot toward people who disagree with you.

You might want to reconsider.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2016 at 18:29 UTC
In reply to:

fad: Let's face facts. Photography by its very nature is superficial. What it captures is surfaces. And since surfaces bear only a tangential relationship to inner reality and the truth of event, all photos distort the truth, or, if one wants to bore down harder, all photos lie.

I don't see how using the same distorting filter that creates lies about celebrities gives us any insight into the tragic predicaments of the homeless, or expresses their central humanity. It is a cheap gimmick. And I find its glib superficiality demeaning to both its subjects and to us viewers. I don't need a smug young man with a camera to tell me that God loves people who do not look like me.

In NYC, the homeless are hardly overlooked:

"The $1.04 billion that the Department of Homeless Services is forecast to spend through June 30 is more than each of the city's budgets for transportation, parks, libraries, cultural affairs and affordable housing." "People should be astonished by the amount of money that is being spent and apparently to little avail," said Martin Oesterreich, a homeless services commissioner for Mayor Rudy Giuliani, a Republican. Mr. Oesterreich's budget was in the $400-million range when he left office in 2001. "Somebody's got to get a hold of it."

Thinking photography gives us any valid insight into complex social issues is nonsense. It basically a parlor trick played on our visual senses and our tendency to think superficially.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2016 at 18:00 UTC
In reply to:

fad: Let's face facts. Photography by its very nature is superficial. What it captures is surfaces. And since surfaces bear only a tangential relationship to inner reality and the truth of event, all photos distort the truth, or, if one wants to bore down harder, all photos lie.

I don't see how using the same distorting filter that creates lies about celebrities gives us any insight into the tragic predicaments of the homeless, or expresses their central humanity. It is a cheap gimmick. And I find its glib superficiality demeaning to both its subjects and to us viewers. I don't need a smug young man with a camera to tell me that God loves people who do not look like me.

It requires a healthy human and/or spiritual imagination to appreciate the humanity of people who are different from us, whether they are homeless or billionaires. Disabilities are something we all have, to various degrees, and it is clear to me, and others, that they basically define our humanity. One of my disabilities is hearing loss. It is completely invisible, and profoundly socially isolating. Taking glamour shots of deaf people is not going to increase love, acceptance and understanding.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2016 at 17:57 UTC

Let's face facts. Photography by its very nature is superficial. What it captures is surfaces. And since surfaces bear only a tangential relationship to inner reality and the truth of event, all photos distort the truth, or, if one wants to bore down harder, all photos lie.

I don't see how using the same distorting filter that creates lies about celebrities gives us any insight into the tragic predicaments of the homeless, or expresses their central humanity. It is a cheap gimmick. And I find its glib superficiality demeaning to both its subjects and to us viewers. I don't need a smug young man with a camera to tell me that God loves people who do not look like me.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2016 at 17:57 UTC as 16th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

fad: I wish my fellow dslr users would relax about Leica. Leica cameras are exotics. Exotics are products that are more expensive and more specialized than mainstream ones. They exist because some people want them.

Leicas are within my budget, but I don't have the need for them. I did buy the 55mm Otus just to have the experience it provides. The lens has taught me things about photography, but it is not practical for most things. My inexpensive 1.8G primes and, of course, various zooms are much more useful. But it gives me pleasure to have a lens that is totally impractical and, occasionally, give me results different from what my excellent Nikon equipment can provide. That's what exotics do, give a different experience. The difference can help educate us. They can, rarely, fit us like a glove. They can provide psychological satisfaction. They take nothing away from any other equipment or anyone else's creative experience.

Leica should be applauded for working so hard to try to remain relevant in a rapidly changing world.

Think of it this way. Their excellent lenses are mated to an outdated technology in rangefinder bodies. They are approaching this problem creatively. God bless them.

Link | Posted on Nov 22, 2015 at 17:56 UTC

I wish my fellow dslr users would relax about Leica. Leica cameras are exotics. Exotics are products that are more expensive and more specialized than mainstream ones. They exist because some people want them.

Leicas are within my budget, but I don't have the need for them. I did buy the 55mm Otus just to have the experience it provides. The lens has taught me things about photography, but it is not practical for most things. My inexpensive 1.8G primes and, of course, various zooms are much more useful. But it gives me pleasure to have a lens that is totally impractical and, occasionally, give me results different from what my excellent Nikon equipment can provide. That's what exotics do, give a different experience. The difference can help educate us. They can, rarely, fit us like a glove. They can provide psychological satisfaction. They take nothing away from any other equipment or anyone else's creative experience.

Link | Posted on Nov 22, 2015 at 17:54 UTC as 10th comment | 2 replies
On photo Mettle in the --Adonis 2015- (In BW) challenge (1 comment in total)

Congratulations, bughunter, from your old friends on the SP forum!

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2015 at 01:17 UTC as 2nd comment
On article Mono a mono: Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246) hands-on (713 comments in total)

My wife kindly offered to buy me a Leica for Xmas, and I turned her down. I feel the romance of the Leica, but I don't see its practical benefits for street photography over my various FX Nikons. For fine MF glass, I have an Otus 55mm.

Except for smaller size, and better MF after about a year of adjustment, what does any of the newer Leicas offer me as a photographic instrument that is superior to the better sensors, DR, low light, AF, color in the D810, D750, D4s (and perhaps soon a D5) in the best Nikons?

I don't care about hand feel and so forth. My cameras are invisible to me.

Link | Posted on Jul 9, 2015 at 16:17 UTC as 29th comment | 2 replies
On article Readers' Showcase: Documentary and Street photography (108 comments in total)
In reply to:

JEROME NOLAS: #1 is #1!

I'd like to thank dpr for showcasing some photos from the street/documentary forum. It looks like a good selection to me.

I also congratulate the viewers whose experience had to be circumscribed by the format, the size of the images, the absence of text, the fact that a showcase like this cannot give a representative idea of the photographer and the disparity of photographers and even treatment (BW/color) removes the chance of the photos commenting on each other.

Viewers might find it interesting to dip into the post from which the photos were taken, to get a better sense of each photographer:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/54566180

These are the submissions that got > 1 like:

zubu
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/54579302
fad
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/54579547
xtoph
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/54584327
doncath
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/54584804
geraldpp is a pro
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/54578952
and many others.

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2014 at 03:19 UTC
On article Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM review (592 comments in total)

The Otus is not for you. Even understanding it is not for you.

But it is for him:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=90228.0

Link | Posted on May 29, 2014 at 03:53 UTC as 74th comment
On article Behind the scenes: Garry Winogrand at work (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

webrunner5: I would think about anyone of us would take a few good pictures if we had the nerve he did and took 100 thousand shots.

Well, the issue isn't whether he did. That is not in dispute. He was a prolific photographer.

The question is how good an artist is he really? How do his best images stack up against the best street photographers of all time and the other best photographers of his generation.

Do his images have psychological depth. No. Never, in fact.
Do they have thoughtful, reflective and contemplative themes. No. Never.
Does he show deep insight into human interaction. No again.
Do we discover anything in his images that we did not know before about anything but photography. Nope. He did not care about anything else.
So his images are about photography, as he himself says. Well, he does have something to say there. But we'd still have a pretty good idea of what photography is, if he had never lifted a camera.

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2014 at 06:37 UTC
On article Behind the scenes: Garry Winogrand at work (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

webrunner5: I would think about anyone of us would take a few good pictures if we had the nerve he did and took 100 thousand shots.

Yes, he is actually a very disappointing photographer, lacking insight and poetry, but leveraging a fanatical love of the craft into a number of strong images.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2014 at 20:02 UTC
On article Behind the scenes: Garry Winogrand at work (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

RobertSigmund: I knew this movie. A pity he died so early. Maybe because of his big fat belly! :-(

There is very little relationship between obesity and mortality. What little there is is very likely the result that obesity is correlated with low socio-economic status, which has a powerful effect on mortality. The link to the NIC cites only one study (which would be worthliess without strong corroboration) that 'suggests' such small increases in risk that they are barely statistical noise.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2014 at 20:00 UTC
On article Nikon D4s: CP+ Hands-on and interview (54 comments in total)

As a night street photographer, I have pre-ordered it. Better AF responsiveness and slightly lower noise levels will mean more keepers.

Not too many other amateurs who have a D4 will probably find it as useful.

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 16:27 UTC as 11th comment
On article Nikon AF-S Nikkor 58mm f/1.4G review (416 comments in total)

This is a wonderful character lens, and we should be glad it exists. It specializes in smoothness/bokeh and capturing light sources at night.

Personally, I'm using the 50/1.8 as a walkaround lens and a pretty good night lens.

When my Otus finally comes, it should be a superior night/portrait/still life lens to the 58/1.4. But if AF or budget are considerations, the 58/1.4 looks pretty cool.

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2013 at 08:32 UTC as 104th comment | 1 reply
On article DPReview Gear of the Year Part 3: Olympus OM-D E-M1 (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

Chris2210: I too owned [and loved!] the GF1 and 20 f1.7 - an ideal [for its time] large-pocket camera marrying portability with IQ that gave very little up for its convenience. But I am a relatively recent convert to the idea that a m4/3 camera might be my principal shooter and the EM1/12-40 has helped me along to that conclusion.

I've still got my 5DII and 50mm/24-105mm/ 70-200mm f2.8L. Is there a difference in image quality - yes, if you look very closely at pixel level or want wafer-thin DoF.

But there's no doubt in my mind the Olympus zoom is better than the 24-105L [which I don't think is all that fantastic]. Only the Oly software seems to be able to open the RAW files at the moment, but this is possibly the first camera I've ever had where I'm happy enough to mostly use the JPEGs.

I'm now very rarely taking out the 5DII - because as you succinctly express it it, most of the time the IQ of the EM1 is more than good enough.

I was recently at a multi-day family gathering and mostly shot with my X100 and Iphone 5s. I was really pleased to be able to get shots with my cameras that are not FF. But when I got home, and looked at the shots on my calibrated 30" Nec Multisync monitor, the richness of the LR *thumbnails* from the few D4 shots I took just blew me away. The differences were not small, and the PP possibilities were greater. These were mostly indoor available light, but not extreme.

Don't get me wrong. My favorite shot was taken with the Iphone in daylight. But if you're into art photography, FF has many more layers of richness than smaller formats. ASC and m43 and cell may indeed be suitable for most purposes, but the advantages of FF are many and subtle and instantly visible, at least to me, on a good monitor at very small sizes.

BTW, if I were buying a small system today, it would be the EM1, because it is a complete and balanced system.

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2013 at 17:45 UTC
On article Celebrated photographer Saul Leiter dies, aged 89 (11 comments in total)

Sometimes the good die old.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2013 at 13:56 UTC as 11th comment
In reply to:

fad: I don't think it matters much whether this photo was faked.

Why? What makes this photo memorable is not its documentary quality, but that it captures the idea of war in general, and of this war in this place and time in particular. No one cares, outside of the photo, who the subject was. And no one is using it for forensic purposes.

The Iliad is still the supreme poem of war, even if there never were an Achilles, or a Hector, or a Priam or a Helen. Why? It captures the idea of war in all its complexity, its glory and its horror. An inferior poem that was historically accurate would not be as great.

Many of the great street photos we admire were faked. But they have artistic truth.

Now if Muybridge faked his horses or George Roger has created a fake death camp, that would be a different matter. But here the reality of what happened does not matter.

mcshan

You are easily impressed. ;~)

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2013 at 18:37 UTC

I don't think it matters much whether this photo was faked.

Why? What makes this photo memorable is not its documentary quality, but that it captures the idea of war in general, and of this war in this place and time in particular. No one cares, outside of the photo, who the subject was. And no one is using it for forensic purposes.

The Iliad is still the supreme poem of war, even if there never were an Achilles, or a Hector, or a Priam or a Helen. Why? It captures the idea of war in all its complexity, its glory and its horror. An inferior poem that was historically accurate would not be as great.

Many of the great street photos we admire were faked. But they have artistic truth.

Now if Muybridge faked his horses or George Roger has created a fake death camp, that would be a different matter. But here the reality of what happened does not matter.

Link | Posted on Nov 3, 2013 at 13:54 UTC as 21st comment | 5 replies
On article Retro Nikon 'DF' emerges from the shadows (1394 comments in total)
In reply to:

jacketpotato: Monochrome sensor ?

Would perhaps be what Nikon sees as "Pure Photography"

Sets Df apart from D6xx D8xx not just cosmetically but also internally.

Canon does not have autofocus with face detection. It focuses on whatever is closest to the camera. That, IMHO, is not state of the art today.
That is why I have not bought one despite having a full stable of Canon lenses.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2013 at 21:42 UTC
Total: 82, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »