Ferling

Ferling

Lives in United States Wherever I need to go, United States
Works as a Whatever I need to shoot
Has a website at http://ferling.net
Joined on Jun 12, 2008
About me:

Been shooting for 30 years. Everything from MF to whatever fits in the hand, (including video). Ran an in-house commercial studio for 12 years. I currently do limited freelance work, (choosing those assignments that don't involve cheapskates). I prefer DSLRs, shoot MF film on occasion, and don't mind compacts. I don't care what you shoot with, so long as you have appreciation for shooting.

Comments

Total: 136, showing: 1 – 20
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On 500px Prime goes live, photographers now get 70% not 30% news story (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mark Smiles: Suppose a guy went to an hardware store to purchase a tool, say a hammer. The clerk would then run a credit check to see how much he could afford and quiz him about his intended use of the hammer including if he was going to make any money using the hammer. Then the clerk could then decide on what would be a fair price to charge for the hammer.

Suppose a gal had a sore throat and went to the drugstore to get some cough drops. The clerk would then check how much she could afford to pay, and determine how important her voice was to her earning a living. The clerk could then determine what he could then charge the gal.

In both of these examples the selling price of the product was not based upon the cost of production, but rather the intended use of the product.

I can hear the hammer manufacturer saying he used my hammer to build a million dollar house, of course I deserve a cut of the action, for I made him a tool. Likewise for the gate at the gal's concert ...

Well, Mark. It's all about access. Hammers and cough drops (used in your example) are readily available and common, just like images of landscapes, trees and every day items used in stock. Shoot something exclusive, or provide something made of unobtanium and the price goes up. Class dismissed.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2014 at 04:50 UTC
On Nikon D4s First Impressions Review preview (819 comments in total)
In reply to:

OBI656: Nobody Knows Anything ... Highly recommended article to read !

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/nobody_knows_anything.shtml

Agree. Other than that article, at least I've spent considerably less time online as a result of the nothing worth reading about, otherwise.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 18:39 UTC
On A look inside Sigma's lens factory news story (89 comments in total)

With regards to a PR show, it covers the bases with medical grade clean rooms, workers patiently focusing on their work (rather than conversing and joking with one another). Setup workers making routine QC checks. Tool and Die Makers performing maintenance on molds and tooling.

There's a fine balance of hand's on vs. automation. Hand painted and polished parts with the all critical final hand assembly, translates into a more personable product that suggests a craftsmanship once regarded to a much higher priced product.

What's missing, however, is a brief take on the workers on break, perhaps conversing and showing some humor. Also missing is a small snippet on any safety (such as the typical "zero injuries in X days" sign on wall -if it exists). A safe and happy work place translates into a higher quality product.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2014 at 23:34 UTC as 17th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

maddox: As most of us know this has been the photographers lot for years now. The days of making a living wage have all but gone. Staffers at a number of newspapers have been replaced by the journalist and a smartphone.

The daily's are full of agency photos where in the past staffers were sent out.
Even the BBC is full of amateur video footage and they encourage viewers to send in their news pics for free and thousands do.

I do some event photography at weekends and struggle to make £150 a day. I notice my clients are encouraging those on the event to submit their own photos and many do which are adequate for web site use. I expect eventually I will loose this work as they will get more than enough pics for free.

This is why 500px can promote this business model.

It's all about content and access. Content still being "king", and access from having the right tools (skills) and permission (client, agreement, contract, etc.) to extoll a fee.

With the majority of today's content being essentially free, there's very little if any profits to be made. Only those whom have exclusive access to create unique and uncommon images, (product, event and corporate photography) are making it.

Some make a name for themselves and will continue to do so long as their contacts/clients actively remain in positions of influence to win them work (I hope they have more than one).

Still, the schools continue to crank out the hungry hordes whom wind up busing tables, etc. to pay for their tuition. I'm certain many of them would have done differently if they did their homework and built a business plan, first. (I wish high schools would make business planning a required project).

500px taking a 70% cut is another example of the disparity in which the market exist.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2014 at 16:57 UTC
In reply to:

Ferling: I think it's time that we drop the "smart" or "cell" phone monicker and consider this and other collections as what they are: Photography. These articles tend to suggest that credit belongs to the tools, and not to the artist.

She admits, as expected, that it requires several takes and ensuring that the lighting is good. Because she has adequate access (being a chef and working in the environment for hours on end) she is almost guaranteed a result.

A real paid professional (and it's not just food) does not have such luxuries. Being limited by a finite amount of time and budget, must utilize a significant of gear to build/provide the required lighting and environment to get the shot, (a cell phone will not be one of those tools).

This by no means belittles April's work or technique, as she's good. It just means we have to step back and consider all the elements before we consider an all assuming title that smartphones are capable of killing the professional market.

Wudyi. You and I live in a different reality. While I agree that the market has changed, those whom refused to change with it (refused to go digital, relied solely on prints for profits, and never took up video), went under. The technology and their refusal to accept it, killed them off.

Why on earth would I drag out a van full of lighting and support gear and then use a Smart Phone as the capture device? I would be laughed out of the studio, or never asked to come back.

Second. Anyone whom swears by a smart phone today, has forgotten that it was much higher end technology that got them there, and are just using their name alone to sell it.

Common sense isn't common.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2014 at 01:49 UTC
On SmugMug Films: Pulse-pounding aerial photography news story (33 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ferling: Whom else has a studio at 10,000 feet, going 300mph in the cold, deafening wind that is qualify to make a disrespectful comment?

I'm sure that if you were sitting in the seat next to her, door removed and giving directions over the radio, your pulse would pound too.

I liked it, a lot.

Yes, Richard. Obvious some find it easier to complain and find fault with hard working folks like Jessica, than to look at themselves in the mirror. :)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2014 at 01:25 UTC

Folks. There are people out there with money to burn. While the technology is awash with very capable gear at bargain prices. Like a peacock proudly presents it's feathers, some with the means will buy this to just for the sake to prove that they can. It's not rocket science, it just is what it is. Nothing more, and surely nothing for less.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2014 at 01:18 UTC as 202nd comment
On SmugMug Films: Pulse-pounding aerial photography news story (33 comments in total)

Whom else has a studio at 10,000 feet, going 300mph in the cold, deafening wind that is qualify to make a disrespectful comment?

I'm sure that if you were sitting in the seat next to her, door removed and giving directions over the radio, your pulse would pound too.

I liked it, a lot.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 2, 2014 at 16:56 UTC as 16th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Ferling: I think it's time that we drop the "smart" or "cell" phone monicker and consider this and other collections as what they are: Photography. These articles tend to suggest that credit belongs to the tools, and not to the artist.

She admits, as expected, that it requires several takes and ensuring that the lighting is good. Because she has adequate access (being a chef and working in the environment for hours on end) she is almost guaranteed a result.

A real paid professional (and it's not just food) does not have such luxuries. Being limited by a finite amount of time and budget, must utilize a significant of gear to build/provide the required lighting and environment to get the shot, (a cell phone will not be one of those tools).

This by no means belittles April's work or technique, as she's good. It just means we have to step back and consider all the elements before we consider an all assuming title that smartphones are capable of killing the professional market.

@Model Mike

Because? (Enlighten me).

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2014 at 18:36 UTC

I think it's time that we drop the "smart" or "cell" phone monicker and consider this and other collections as what they are: Photography. These articles tend to suggest that credit belongs to the tools, and not to the artist.

She admits, as expected, that it requires several takes and ensuring that the lighting is good. Because she has adequate access (being a chef and working in the environment for hours on end) she is almost guaranteed a result.

A real paid professional (and it's not just food) does not have such luxuries. Being limited by a finite amount of time and budget, must utilize a significant of gear to build/provide the required lighting and environment to get the shot, (a cell phone will not be one of those tools).

This by no means belittles April's work or technique, as she's good. It just means we have to step back and consider all the elements before we consider an all assuming title that smartphones are capable of killing the professional market.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2014 at 14:29 UTC as 29th comment | 4 replies
On Russian Mother captures atmospheric photos of sons on farm news story (592 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joe Ogiba: DPR, the #1 place where everyone gets their cookies trashing other peoples images.

Have to agree, being on the net since it's inception (and in my experience), there has been a sharp rise of trolls and nasty comments in just the last five years alone. I have left several forums because of this. Much of it has to do with moderation (which can be a time consuming job) to filter and remove them.

One fix is to have a "real names" forum (where you don't hide behind an alias), such as DV Info and photo.net for example.

I've learned is that it's best is to ignore these attention seeking individuals, whom don't reveal their true identity and can't prove their claims.

I do like Elena's work and her composition is excellent (BTW I still use a 5D Mk1 -gasp). I wish her well in her future endeavors.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 26, 2014 at 16:41 UTC
On AP cuts ties with Pulitzer-winning photographer news story (170 comments in total)

Shock and yAwen. They might as well demand photogs shoot with film and send the negs to competent labs whom wont use dodge and burn... oh, wait.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 24, 2014 at 11:32 UTC as 53rd comment

She made the right choice by going when she's young and able, free from the burden and responsibility of raising a family, (imagine doing these things in one's retirement years when the joints are failing and the heart is weak).

It's ok to have your dessert as the first course of the meal. I applaud her decision and wish her well.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 21, 2014 at 11:15 UTC as 10th comment | 2 replies
On Mount St. Helens images found decades later news story (27 comments in total)

I was living in Snohomish, about 200 miles away, at the time of the eruption. I was doing chores outside and could clearly hear the explosion which sounded like a high powered rifle. Since we lived in farm way out in woods I gave it little thought until my Mom frantically called me in watch the event on the TV.

It quickly escalated into a scary deal, not knowing if the winds would shift and send the ash clouds in our direction. The local hardware stores sold out of plastic sheeting and tarps.

I'll never forget it.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2014 at 11:35 UTC as 8th comment
On CES 2014: Canon Stand Report news story (48 comments in total)

It's not rocket science. There is a flood of new, young buyers whom view the camera very differently, and thus needs of the market has changed.

In all my years of shooting, I've learned that it's best to accept change (even if it's not the kind that jingles).

Direct link | Posted on Jan 11, 2014 at 00:37 UTC as 6th comment
On CES 2014: What we experienced at Pepcom Digital Experience news story (28 comments in total)

Gonna side track a little and take notice about how marketing over the past few decades has went from the 'proud to work, contribute or be more effecitve' to an 'all about me' message. Thus we now have connective hardware and software that allows one to fulfill that purpose.

Selfish selfies aside. It's still awesome to consider how we can communicate in ways unimagined even a few short years ago. That the camera itself has been reduced to an appliance.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2014 at 11:22 UTC as 7th comment

In thirty years of shooting I've found that when trying to achieve the ultimate goal of the perfect device to capture the perfect image, despite all my efforts and investment, that content will always remain king.

Therefore, it's no surprise that the shortest path to that goal is exactly what a cell phone delivers.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 4, 2014 at 00:27 UTC as 60th comment
On Have Your Say: Best DSLR / SLT of 2013 news story (349 comments in total)

Uhm... (grabs nearly worn out 7D and heads out to the next job).

Direct link | Posted on Dec 19, 2013 at 01:40 UTC as 88th comment
On Want to remember something? Don't take a photo news story (185 comments in total)
In reply to:

neo_nights: One more thing: did anyone actually read the WHOLE study?

Anyone who has done an academic research knows how frustrating/infuriating it is to spend months/years reading, reasearching and such, write pages and more pages about something and then the press just publish a couple of lines about it, about its conclusion, and then everyone starts b*tching about it.

Be careful with pre-judgements, people.

Properly done, a published report has a summary for declarations of findings (which is general the free part), with the body of the document detailing the research and references that gives factual evidence to prove those findings. Paying for this portion of a document is nothing new. Publishing those portions of the document by third parties requires approval of the author(s).

Therefore, it's very likely those quotes are what the authors approved as their summary.

In my opinion, the act of photography trains one to focus on their surroundings and thus form the basis of memories from which the image recalls. It's not rocket science. I have over 30K images I've bothered to keep over the years and I recall things from each one of them.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 14, 2013 at 15:19 UTC
On Want to remember something? Don't take a photo news story (185 comments in total)
In reply to:

neo_nights: Funny how people are getting so defensive here :p

No one said that you (we) should stop taking pictures. Only states that (as some people already said here), when you are too focused on getting a photograph, you don't really pay attention to everything else around you. Thus, it's harder to remember details of the scene.

This also reminds me of those parents so obsessed in "recording" every moment of their babies' life that they (parents) actually forget to LIVE the moment with their kids. Or people who go to a concert and are so focused on photographing their favorit artists that end up forgeting to enjoy the show. And so on.

The act of photographing means that you are paying attention to the surroundings in hopes to capture something you've noticed.

The real issue is the constant distractions of our current technology in total, (i.e. cellphones, texting, Facebook, tablets, etc.). Unlike my generation, growing up in the analog era, we are decades away from seeing the real effects of this.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 14, 2013 at 14:02 UTC
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