Alex Permit

Alex Permit

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Sep 12, 2002
About me:

Currently own:

Nikon D3s 14-24mm f/2.8G, 24-70 f/2.8G, 24-70mm f/2.8G, 70-200 f/2.8 VR2

Sony nex 5, 6, 7, SEL1018 10-18mm, 50mm, 55-210mm F4.5-6.3, Zeiss 12mm f/2.8

Leica 28mm f/2.8 ASPH

Voigtlander Nokton Aspherical 35mm f/1.2

Fuji x100, x100s

Canon 10D, Canon 20D, 16-35 f2.8L, 50 f1.4, 85 f1.2L, 70-200 f2.8L IS, 24-70 f2.8L, 28-135 f3.5 IS

Panasonic GF1, GH1, Panasonic 20mm f1.7, 14-45, 7-14, 14-140, 45-200

Panasonic ZS3, TZ5, Minolta A2, Minolta Xg, Canon s400

Epson 3880, Artisan 810, Canon MP970, HP D7560, HP 8450, HP L7680

Comments

Total: 80, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous1234Next ›Last »
In reply to:

nananananana: get a life MIT

That was Ed Thorp, famous author of "beat the dealer" and his follow-up "beat the market". He's a legend on wall street, as are many other MIT alum such as Jim Simmons.

MIT attracts the brightest and makes them even smarter. Other schools are known for their style, panache, and relationships. MIT is known for its brains. Not only is it the best engineering school in the world, its in a class by itself.

Direct link | Posted on May 15, 2015 at 21:23 UTC
In reply to:

nananananana: get a life MIT

No.

Read the article carefully.
The "algorithm" used by the state lottery was flawed, and MIT students figured that out and took advantage of it.

They didn't steal this information, they didn't break any rules or laws. MIT may have "gamed" the system, but they certainly didn't scam, or mug anybody.

They were just smarter then anyone else.

Direct link | Posted on May 15, 2015 at 20:04 UTC
In reply to:

J A C S: "If successful the algorithm may have serious consequences for the flexible rubber lens hood market..."

That was a joke, right?

And a very funny one at that.

Direct link | Posted on May 15, 2015 at 19:46 UTC
In reply to:

J A C S: "If successful the algorithm may have serious consequences for the flexible rubber lens hood market..."

That was a joke, right?

It's no joke. The music industry, print media, taxis have all been decimated by new technologies. Flexible rubber lens hoods are next. And as goes flexible lens hoods, so goes the entire lens hood market.

Be afraid.

Direct link | Posted on May 14, 2015 at 17:20 UTC
On Big Zoom: Nikon Coolpix P900 real-world samples article (153 comments in total)

The FZ1000 can go up to 1600mm using its digital zoom. I wonder if the image quality would be comparable to the P900 at 2000mm. Take into account that the the FZ1000 sensor is roughly four times the size of the P900.

You do get more megapixels from the p900, but i doubt youre getting 16mp worth of resolution at 2000mm

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2015 at 04:15 UTC as 42nd comment | 8 replies
On Interview: Canon's Chuck Westfall on the new XC10 article (347 comments in total)
In reply to:

Francis Carver: Now, if I could just saw off that wretched, dark as Darth Vader lens and crazy glue another better (read: usable in video as well) optic in its place, maybe we would have something... right after swapping out the smart phone sized sensor to something larger and again, more usable. Oh yeah, and I would have to duct tape a viewfinder on there someplace as well, right?

If you really need timecode because you're shooting multiple cams, get the YAGH box for the GH4.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 29, 2015 at 13:27 UTC
On Interview: Canon's Chuck Westfall on the new XC10 article (347 comments in total)
In reply to:

Francis Carver: Now, if I could just saw off that wretched, dark as Darth Vader lens and crazy glue another better (read: usable in video as well) optic in its place, maybe we would have something... right after swapping out the smart phone sized sensor to something larger and again, more usable. Oh yeah, and I would have to duct tape a viewfinder on there someplace as well, right?

You mean a GH4?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 28, 2015 at 19:02 UTC
On Interview: Canon's Chuck Westfall on the new XC10 article (347 comments in total)

A souped up FZ1000 for the price of a gh4. For $2500 I'll take a gh4, thank you.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 25, 2015 at 20:58 UTC as 30th comment | 3 replies
On Sony sells half of its Olympus stake article (90 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: Smart investment. They sold half of the stake they owned and made a $390 million capital gain on it. Which means they made the same gain on the other half they still have.

Sony made a potential $780 million profit on this brief investment. Which is probably the best investment they have made in a long time.

As a former currency trader, you know full well they would not buy "the shares just as a currency investment and they overpaid on purpose".

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2015 at 02:52 UTC
On Sony sells half of its Olympus stake article (90 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: Smart investment. They sold half of the stake they owned and made a $390 million capital gain on it. Which means they made the same gain on the other half they still have.

Sony made a potential $780 million profit on this brief investment. Which is probably the best investment they have made in a long time.

The value of a stock is what someone will pay you for it. JP Morgan looked at all the internal financials and decided the 5% stake in Olympus is worth Y46bn. They know alot more than we do. The best information we have is that the other 5% stake is also worth Y46bn.

JP Morgan would not buy stock as a round about way to buy yen. If they wanted to buy yen, they would buy yen. JP Morgan is one of the largest market makers in the currency market, which in turn is the largest, most liquid market in the world.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 13:55 UTC
On Sony sells half of its Olympus stake article (90 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: Smart investment. They sold half of the stake they owned and made a $390 million capital gain on it. Which means they made the same gain on the other half they still have.

Sony made a potential $780 million profit on this brief investment. Which is probably the best investment they have made in a long time.

They bought for Y50bn. They sold half for Y46bn. The total value of what they still own is Y46bn. The total value of what they still own and what they sold is Y92bn. So they made Y42bn.

Sony is a Japanese company. They paid yen, they received yen. USD does not apply.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 1, 2015 at 21:49 UTC
In reply to:

fmian: Seriously needs to have a faster lens.
When I can buy a medium format system camera with f/2.8 lens for $250 why would I want this? Add a bit more money and I can get a polaroid back for it as well. And that would be a well known brand as well instead of an unknown.
Anyway, good luck to them. At least it will get more people interested in analog photography.

nice find

Direct link | Posted on Mar 31, 2015 at 02:16 UTC
On Lytro opens an interactive studio in Tokyo article (45 comments in total)

"This adds Lytro to the growing number of companies using physical retail locations to drum up interest and awareness about a particular product or technology. "

Big companies like Google, Microsoft, and the pioneer of this strategy, Apple. Lytro hasn't quite figured out Its product/userbase yet. Seems premature to be opening a store in Tokyo.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 17, 2015 at 01:36 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (506 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: In 1974, maybe '75, IBM released it's first PC at a cost of something like $50,000, in mid70s dollars. (Irony the PC was at least assembled in Seattle.)

1981, different story.

Look what happened within 20 years to the PC market, and the usefulness of PCs. Every computer development for broad public use that has occured between 1995 and 2015 was well predicted in 1995 by anyone paying attention to computers.

Contrast 1975: Almost none of what came to pass in computers in the next 20 years upto 1995 was being predicted--even by people paying attention to computers. Maybe digital audio. Even into the early 1980s physicists who wanted to demonstrate a new program, software, they'd worked on at a conference would often travel to the conference with the program recorded on punch cards. That's cardboard.

No the Lytro is not likely to be as radical a change to photography as the broad use of a computer, but the nay-sayers here sure sound like many talking about computers in the 1970s.

Then again, some did see it. John Cage, ceo of sun, did predict its impact back in 1984 when he said "the network is the computer".

Direct link | Posted on Mar 1, 2015 at 05:10 UTC
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (506 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: In 1974, maybe '75, IBM released it's first PC at a cost of something like $50,000, in mid70s dollars. (Irony the PC was at least assembled in Seattle.)

1981, different story.

Look what happened within 20 years to the PC market, and the usefulness of PCs. Every computer development for broad public use that has occured between 1995 and 2015 was well predicted in 1995 by anyone paying attention to computers.

Contrast 1975: Almost none of what came to pass in computers in the next 20 years upto 1995 was being predicted--even by people paying attention to computers. Maybe digital audio. Even into the early 1980s physicists who wanted to demonstrate a new program, software, they'd worked on at a conference would often travel to the conference with the program recorded on punch cards. That's cardboard.

No the Lytro is not likely to be as radical a change to photography as the broad use of a computer, but the nay-sayers here sure sound like many talking about computers in the 1970s.

The hp9830 is the first "computer" I programmed, back when i was a kid. I use quotes, because it was really what what we'd call a calculator today. But even before then, people were projecting computers would someday be central to our lives. Remember HAL? Thats what people back in 1968 thought computers could be in 2001.

While the internet did exist in 1985. The world wide web did not. Once it was invented, people caught on pretty quickly how powerful it would be.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 1, 2015 at 04:53 UTC
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (506 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: In 1974, maybe '75, IBM released it's first PC at a cost of something like $50,000, in mid70s dollars. (Irony the PC was at least assembled in Seattle.)

1981, different story.

Look what happened within 20 years to the PC market, and the usefulness of PCs. Every computer development for broad public use that has occured between 1995 and 2015 was well predicted in 1995 by anyone paying attention to computers.

Contrast 1975: Almost none of what came to pass in computers in the next 20 years upto 1995 was being predicted--even by people paying attention to computers. Maybe digital audio. Even into the early 1980s physicists who wanted to demonstrate a new program, software, they'd worked on at a conference would often travel to the conference with the program recorded on punch cards. That's cardboard.

No the Lytro is not likely to be as radical a change to photography as the broad use of a computer, but the nay-sayers here sure sound like many talking about computers in the 1970s.

Howaboutraw
I believe you are wrong. It was not $50k
http://oldcomputers.net/ibm5100.html

I did leave out a bunch of devlopments between 1977 and 1981, including trs 80 ( we used to call it the trash 80 back then). My point is that personal computers started gaining popularity in 1975.

The lytro is no altair, apple, or trs80. Its a dud.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 1, 2015 at 02:43 UTC
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (506 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: In 1974, maybe '75, IBM released it's first PC at a cost of something like $50,000, in mid70s dollars. (Irony the PC was at least assembled in Seattle.)

1981, different story.

Look what happened within 20 years to the PC market, and the usefulness of PCs. Every computer development for broad public use that has occured between 1995 and 2015 was well predicted in 1995 by anyone paying attention to computers.

Contrast 1975: Almost none of what came to pass in computers in the next 20 years upto 1995 was being predicted--even by people paying attention to computers. Maybe digital audio. Even into the early 1980s physicists who wanted to demonstrate a new program, software, they'd worked on at a conference would often travel to the conference with the program recorded on punch cards. That's cardboard.

No the Lytro is not likely to be as radical a change to photography as the broad use of a computer, but the nay-sayers here sure sound like many talking about computers in the 1970s.

HowaboutRAW, you left out some of the story. The IBM 5100 was a PORTABLE computer, and sold for $10-$20 thousand dollars. It flopped. That same year MITS introduced the Altair 8800,which sold for $400 in kit form, $600 assembled. The Altair was quite successful in is day and led to the development of the Apple I in 1976, Apple ][ in 1977, and the IBM PC in 1981.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 28, 2015 at 23:51 UTC
In reply to:

aris14: Just a me too product in the niche of upmarket rangefinders with typical retro minimal design. Oh dear, oh dear...

Me too?? Me who? Are you being sarcastic?

Who else produces a digital rangefinder? Besides Leica, who else produces a ragefinder at all? This is innovative, bold, and brave. Kudos to Konost.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2015 at 02:37 UTC
On Canon 7D mirror box filmed at 10,000fps article (175 comments in total)

Nice find

Direct link | Posted on Jan 31, 2015 at 16:43 UTC as 21st comment
On Canon's Q4 earnings report shows camera sales are down article (315 comments in total)

If one compares the 2014 operating profits, relative to sales, of the imaging segments of Canon (14.5%), Nikon (4.8%), Sony (11.3%), Oly (-8.3), or Fuji (6.3%), Canon is king at milking profits from a shrinking hill. As an investor, I'd go with Canon. As a consumer, I'd go elsewhere.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 30, 2015 at 18:51 UTC as 11th comment
Total: 80, showing: 1 – 20
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