Alex Permit

Alex Permit

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Sep 12, 2002
About me:

Currently own:

Nikon D3s 14-24mm f/2.8G, 24-70 f/2.8G, 24-70mm f/2.8G, 70-200 f/2.8 VR2

Sony nex 5, 6, 7, SEL1018 10-18mm, 50mm, 55-210mm F4.5-6.3, Zeiss 12mm f/2.8

Leica 28mm f/2.8 ASPH

Voigtlander Nokton Aspherical 35mm f/1.2

Fuji x100, x100s

Canon 10D, Canon 20D, 16-35 f2.8L, 50 f1.4, 85 f1.2L, 70-200 f2.8L IS, 24-70 f2.8L, 28-135 f3.5 IS

Panasonic GF1, GH1, Panasonic 20mm f1.7, 14-45, 7-14, 14-140, 45-200

Panasonic ZS3, TZ5, Minolta A2, Minolta Xg, Canon s400

Epson 3880, Artisan 810, Canon MP970, HP D7560, HP 8450, HP L7680

Comments

Total: 68, showing: 1 – 20
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On Lytro opens an interactive studio in Tokyo article (45 comments in total)

"This adds Lytro to the growing number of companies using physical retail locations to drum up interest and awareness about a particular product or technology. "

Big companies like Google, Microsoft, and the pioneer of this strategy, Apple. Lytro hasn't quite figured out Its product/userbase yet. Seems premature to be opening a store in Tokyo.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 17, 2015 at 01:36 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (506 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: In 1974, maybe '75, IBM released it's first PC at a cost of something like $50,000, in mid70s dollars. (Irony the PC was at least assembled in Seattle.)

1981, different story.

Look what happened within 20 years to the PC market, and the usefulness of PCs. Every computer development for broad public use that has occured between 1995 and 2015 was well predicted in 1995 by anyone paying attention to computers.

Contrast 1975: Almost none of what came to pass in computers in the next 20 years upto 1995 was being predicted--even by people paying attention to computers. Maybe digital audio. Even into the early 1980s physicists who wanted to demonstrate a new program, software, they'd worked on at a conference would often travel to the conference with the program recorded on punch cards. That's cardboard.

No the Lytro is not likely to be as radical a change to photography as the broad use of a computer, but the nay-sayers here sure sound like many talking about computers in the 1970s.

Then again, some did see it. John Cage, ceo of sun, did predict its impact back in 1984 when he said "the network is the computer".

Direct link | Posted on Mar 1, 2015 at 05:10 UTC
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (506 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: In 1974, maybe '75, IBM released it's first PC at a cost of something like $50,000, in mid70s dollars. (Irony the PC was at least assembled in Seattle.)

1981, different story.

Look what happened within 20 years to the PC market, and the usefulness of PCs. Every computer development for broad public use that has occured between 1995 and 2015 was well predicted in 1995 by anyone paying attention to computers.

Contrast 1975: Almost none of what came to pass in computers in the next 20 years upto 1995 was being predicted--even by people paying attention to computers. Maybe digital audio. Even into the early 1980s physicists who wanted to demonstrate a new program, software, they'd worked on at a conference would often travel to the conference with the program recorded on punch cards. That's cardboard.

No the Lytro is not likely to be as radical a change to photography as the broad use of a computer, but the nay-sayers here sure sound like many talking about computers in the 1970s.

The hp9830 is the first "computer" I programmed, back when i was a kid. I use quotes, because it was really what what we'd call a calculator today. But even before then, people were projecting computers would someday be central to our lives. Remember HAL? Thats what people back in 1968 thought computers could be in 2001.

While the internet did exist in 1985. The world wide web did not. Once it was invented, people caught on pretty quickly how powerful it would be.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 1, 2015 at 04:53 UTC
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (506 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: In 1974, maybe '75, IBM released it's first PC at a cost of something like $50,000, in mid70s dollars. (Irony the PC was at least assembled in Seattle.)

1981, different story.

Look what happened within 20 years to the PC market, and the usefulness of PCs. Every computer development for broad public use that has occured between 1995 and 2015 was well predicted in 1995 by anyone paying attention to computers.

Contrast 1975: Almost none of what came to pass in computers in the next 20 years upto 1995 was being predicted--even by people paying attention to computers. Maybe digital audio. Even into the early 1980s physicists who wanted to demonstrate a new program, software, they'd worked on at a conference would often travel to the conference with the program recorded on punch cards. That's cardboard.

No the Lytro is not likely to be as radical a change to photography as the broad use of a computer, but the nay-sayers here sure sound like many talking about computers in the 1970s.

Howaboutraw
I believe you are wrong. It was not $50k
http://oldcomputers.net/ibm5100.html

I did leave out a bunch of devlopments between 1977 and 1981, including trs 80 ( we used to call it the trash 80 back then). My point is that personal computers started gaining popularity in 1975.

The lytro is no altair, apple, or trs80. Its a dud.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 1, 2015 at 02:43 UTC
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (506 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: In 1974, maybe '75, IBM released it's first PC at a cost of something like $50,000, in mid70s dollars. (Irony the PC was at least assembled in Seattle.)

1981, different story.

Look what happened within 20 years to the PC market, and the usefulness of PCs. Every computer development for broad public use that has occured between 1995 and 2015 was well predicted in 1995 by anyone paying attention to computers.

Contrast 1975: Almost none of what came to pass in computers in the next 20 years upto 1995 was being predicted--even by people paying attention to computers. Maybe digital audio. Even into the early 1980s physicists who wanted to demonstrate a new program, software, they'd worked on at a conference would often travel to the conference with the program recorded on punch cards. That's cardboard.

No the Lytro is not likely to be as radical a change to photography as the broad use of a computer, but the nay-sayers here sure sound like many talking about computers in the 1970s.

HowaboutRAW, you left out some of the story. The IBM 5100 was a PORTABLE computer, and sold for $10-$20 thousand dollars. It flopped. That same year MITS introduced the Altair 8800,which sold for $400 in kit form, $600 assembled. The Altair was quite successful in is day and led to the development of the Apple I in 1976, Apple ][ in 1977, and the IBM PC in 1981.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 28, 2015 at 23:51 UTC
In reply to:

aris14: Just a me too product in the niche of upmarket rangefinders with typical retro minimal design. Oh dear, oh dear...

Me too?? Me who? Are you being sarcastic?

Who else produces a digital rangefinder? Besides Leica, who else produces a ragefinder at all? This is innovative, bold, and brave. Kudos to Konost.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2015 at 02:37 UTC
On Canon 7D mirror box filmed at 10,000fps article (175 comments in total)

Nice find

Direct link | Posted on Jan 31, 2015 at 16:43 UTC as 21st comment
On Canon's Q4 earnings report shows camera sales are down article (315 comments in total)

If one compares the 2014 operating profits, relative to sales, of the imaging segments of Canon (14.5%), Nikon (4.8%), Sony (11.3%), Oly (-8.3), or Fuji (6.3%), Canon is king at milking profits from a shrinking hill. As an investor, I'd go with Canon. As a consumer, I'd go elsewhere.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 30, 2015 at 18:51 UTC as 11th comment
On High-end full frame roundup (2014) article (589 comments in total)
In reply to:

zakk9: Isn't it a bit strange to call it "High-end full frame roundup" and include the low-end D610, 6D and A7 but not the high end 1DX and D4s?

1DX and D4s were deemed too "high-end" for this category.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2014 at 23:29 UTC
On High-end full frame roundup (2014) article (589 comments in total)
In reply to:

RolliPoli: Sony: A great manufacturer of transistor radios..... and CMOS sensors for companies that build cameras.

There's a good chance that Nikon is making the steppers Sony is using to create the sensors that Nikon is buying.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2014 at 20:26 UTC
On High-end full frame roundup (2014) article (589 comments in total)
In reply to:

RolliPoli: Sony: A great manufacturer of transistor radios..... and CMOS sensors for companies that build cameras.

This may be boring, but Nikon is essentially a camera company. 75% of its revenues come from its imaging division. It also makes industrial steppers and scanners (18%) and high precision measuring devices (5%)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2014 at 18:05 UTC
On High-end full frame roundup (2014) article (589 comments in total)

Strange to include the RX1R, a great compact fixed lens camera, in a roundup named "Heavy Hitters: high-end full frame roundup". While it is "full frame", it is not, nor does it pretend to be, a "heavy hitter".

Stranger still to exclude the D4S and 1DX because "they're aimed at working photojournalists and sports photographers." Its like excluding the Klitschko brothers from list of heavyweight boxing contenders because they're too tall.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2014 at 15:52 UTC as 63rd comment | 15 replies
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 First Impressions Review preview (302 comments in total)
In reply to:

NAwlins Contrarian: Just when DPReview was getting good at giving us charts with equivalents, I think this one falls down, especially when comparing the GM5 and the RX100 Mk. III.

The review notes the GM5's "tiny viewfinder", but the specifications say it has 0.92x magnification, which sounds large. Presumably reconciling these statements requires adjusting for sensor size, and the GM5's viewfinder has 0.46x-'equivalent to 35mm / full frame' viewfinder magnification. The RX100 III specs list the magnification as 0.59x, which I suspect is already an 'equivalent' figure.

And of course, it's fine to say the GM5 has a larger sensor than the RX100 Mk. III, but with the GM5's compact kit lens, the real comparison is the GM5's equivalent of 24-64mm f/7-11 with the RX100 Mk. III's equivalent of 24-70mm f/4.9-7.6. So when adjusting for both sensor size and aperture, the effective light-gathering puts the RX100 Mk. III 1 stop brighter at the wide end and a little more than 1 stop brighter at the long end.

Higher equivalent amplication leads to greater noise. The advantage of a larger sensor is offset by the higher equivalent amplification needed.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2014 at 13:33 UTC
On Enthusiast mirrorless camera roundup (2014) article (308 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joseph Mama: What the heck?? No mention AT ALL of Sony's offerings? The A5000, new A5100, A6000, and upcoming rumored A7000? Sony has great deals out right now on these cameras and kits.
Ditto with Samsung and their NX offerings.

The a5100 and a6000 are both listed in the midrange list

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/7802516432/mid-range-mirrorless-camera-roundup

Direct link | Posted on Dec 1, 2014 at 19:18 UTC
In reply to:

Pritzl: Like a bad movie, the reruns keep coming...

I agree. This isn't just a bad sequel like Hannibal, follow-up to Silence of the Lambs. This is one of those long, bad franchises. Franchises like Friday the 13th, Nightmare on Elm Street, or Saw.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 26, 2014 at 20:42 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II First Impressions Review preview (2701 comments in total)
In reply to:

topstuff: To me, it looks like something from the last decade.

I know its got killer AF and the BIF guys will love it, but to anyone who doesn't need the sports/BIF AF capability, its just a big heavy brick with average IQ, IMHO.

ALOT of us buy cameras to shoot our kids playing soccer, basketball, or just running around. We appreciate ultra fast AND reliable autofocus. Sales figures imply there are a lot of us.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 20:16 UTC
In reply to:

Alex Permit: Why even bother opening a design facility in Italy if you end up with such monstrosities? It's an insult to the fine tradition of Italian design.

Pinin Farina must be turning in his grave.

Thanks, I did not realize that. As an American, I've associated "Italian" design with the likes of Ferrari, Bulgari, Armani, and Alessi. I guess every culture, though, has a "range" of taste.

For every Miles Davis, there is at least one Justin Timberlake.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2014 at 13:18 UTC

Why even bother opening a design facility in Italy if you end up with such monstrosities? It's an insult to the fine tradition of Italian design.

Pinin Farina must be turning in his grave.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2014 at 04:12 UTC as 53rd comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Marty4650: Lets be honest. The design engineers didn't pull the plug on this project. They LOVE their silly designs. It was the accountants who finally had enough of losing money on this venture.

It might seem impossible to lose money when you take a $800 camera, dress it up in a clown suit, then sell it for $6-$8,000 or so. But somehow they managed to lose money, because if they were making money on this, the design center would still be in full operation. And working overtime to meet demand!

Its impossible to lose money if you actually sell it. I'm guessing the market for a camera dressed in a clown suit was a big, flat, zero.

I don't know where they found the design engineers who created these monstrosities. I've never seen Italians design something so hideous.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 8, 2014 at 20:49 UTC
On First Hasselblad in space goes to auction next month article (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ellis Vener: This is possibly the Hasselblad 500C camera Gordon Cooper purchased at George Lange Camera in Houston.

Makes you wonder, if its not the camera schirra purchased (the website is vague on that point), then the camera on sale is not the first hassy in space.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 2, 2014 at 23:26 UTC
Total: 68, showing: 1 – 20
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