Kabe Luna

Kabe Luna

Lives in United States Seattle, WA, United States
Works as a Grapher Designer + Photographer
Joined on Sep 25, 2006

Comments

Total: 83, showing: 1 – 20
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Hmmm... Don't see anything in the samples that represents a significant advantage over monochrome images created from color captures. So, I'll stick with my Bayer cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 11, 2016 at 16:05 UTC as 75th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

chriscotec: I don't think C1 is quite there yet, in terms of versatility, but I can't wait for any of the "alternative" image editing applications to come of age and knock adobe (lower case intentional ; ) off its ivory tower. I hope it never gets back up when that happens. It would be one less controlling annoyance in a photographer's life.

That's good for a chuckle. You couldn't pay me to go back to using Lightroom. For my style and workflow, Capture One Pro does everything faster and better.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 1, 2015 at 20:39 UTC
On article Panasonic's Post Focus feature arrives November 25 (218 comments in total)

Does this work with RAW images?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2015 at 22:35 UTC as 47th comment | 2 replies
On article Nikon announces development of flagship D5 DSLR (442 comments in total)
In reply to:

nicolaiecostel: Could this be a sign Nikon is desperate for atention and that their products aren't cutting it anymore ?

I love my Nikon gear but after my D700 got retired I soon realised I've got nothing to replace it with.

The D810 is overkill in Mp for my wedding work and the price is 30% over the D700 was, the D610 doesn't cut it in AF and the D750 I tested kinda feels like a toy. The top LCD is pityfull and the whole camera screams :cost cutting:. I know it's strenghts and it's a allround beast but the build is not up to par, I don't think it will take nearly the abuse the D700 took.

When a big company starts sreamlining the productio cost of their key products, I think that's a sign of bad things to come (like Nokia did with the low quality and QC problems of their late top products, two of which I have been dissapointed by).

You're welcome, Nicolaie. Sounds like you really love the D700. Have you considered a buying a couple minty, low-mileage examples second-hand, replacing the shutters and calling it a day? You wouldn't even have to change your workflow!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2015 at 23:08 UTC
On article Nikon announces development of flagship D5 DSLR (442 comments in total)
In reply to:

nicolaiecostel: Could this be a sign Nikon is desperate for atention and that their products aren't cutting it anymore ?

I love my Nikon gear but after my D700 got retired I soon realised I've got nothing to replace it with.

The D810 is overkill in Mp for my wedding work and the price is 30% over the D700 was, the D610 doesn't cut it in AF and the D750 I tested kinda feels like a toy. The top LCD is pityfull and the whole camera screams :cost cutting:. I know it's strenghts and it's a allround beast but the build is not up to par, I don't think it will take nearly the abuse the D700 took.

When a big company starts sreamlining the productio cost of their key products, I think that's a sign of bad things to come (like Nokia did with the low quality and QC problems of their late top products, two of which I have been dissapointed by).

nicolaiecostel, fair enough regarding the punishment through which you put the D700, but the D750 is built nearly identically to most Canon DSLRs (which is to say, a notch below Dx and Dxxx Nikons), so if you find it toy-like, don't bother with Canon (I shot Canon non-exclusively from 1989–2013).

Since purchasing my D750 in March, it's become my primary camera and while the handling is perhaps a bit more fiddly, the controls are as positive as the day I bought it and in practice not in the slightest inferior to those of the D800 or D700 before it. (Admittedly, I don't swap lenses anywhere near as often as you do!) The ONLY potential durability problem could be with the flip-out rear monitor, although I very seldom deploy mine and it remains snugly fit to the body when not deliberately pulled out for use.

I can think of a few reasons to pass on the D750, but durability isn't among them. I suspect in no time, you'd find the same confidence in the D750 if you gave it a chance.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2015 at 22:53 UTC
On article Nikon announces development of flagship D5 DSLR (442 comments in total)
In reply to:

nicolaiecostel: Could this be a sign Nikon is desperate for atention and that their products aren't cutting it anymore ?

I love my Nikon gear but after my D700 got retired I soon realised I've got nothing to replace it with.

The D810 is overkill in Mp for my wedding work and the price is 30% over the D700 was, the D610 doesn't cut it in AF and the D750 I tested kinda feels like a toy. The top LCD is pityfull and the whole camera screams :cost cutting:. I know it's strenghts and it's a allround beast but the build is not up to par, I don't think it will take nearly the abuse the D700 took.

When a big company starts sreamlining the productio cost of their key products, I think that's a sign of bad things to come (like Nokia did with the low quality and QC problems of their late top products, two of which I have been dissapointed by).

I shot the D700 for a couple years before replacing it with the D800, which has now been joined by the D750. Neither D800 nor D750 *feels* as sturdy as the D700 did, but in practice neither has proven less robust, and in terms of capability (if not handling), the D750 produces images of appreciably higher quality than the D700. Personally, I'm happy Nikon decided to make the D750 more akin in size and weight to the F100.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2015 at 20:16 UTC
In reply to:

km25: This is good. Not a Sony hater, but a front running sensor maker, not so good at making cameras.

Not worth another moment. Enjoy snapping pics of the pretty flowers in your garden.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 11, 2015 at 19:37 UTC
In reply to:

km25: This is good. Not a Sony hater, but a front running sensor maker, not so good at making cameras.

Actually, the shooting time lost changing a battery (or memory card, for that matter) can result in missing critical moments in the case of weddings, sporting events, etc. The action doesn't pause because you need to swap batteries. But if your photography is of static subject matter, you may not be aware of that - which is why I asked if you shoot for a living and if your subject matter is dynamic.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 10, 2015 at 20:48 UTC
In reply to:

km25: This is good. Not a Sony hater, but a front running sensor maker, not so good at making cameras.

Everythingis1, what qualifies you to speak on behalf of all or even a majority of photographers? Do you shoot for a living? Part-time, even? Ever shot a wedding? Collegiate or professional sporting event?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 10, 2015 at 00:15 UTC

I'd like to see what the lens is capable of. However, even assuming stellar results, $3300 is too dear for me.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 16, 2015 at 15:59 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

km25: This is good. Not a Sony hater, but a front running sensor maker, not so good at making cameras.

During my more recent full day shoot (image libraries for education institutions), I took just under 2700 pictures with my D750 with over 30% charge remaining. The D800, used alongside for the same shoot, captured a trickle over 1700 images with greater than 60% charge remaining. Those are with very minimal chimping, which isn't technically possible with SLT and mirrorless cameras. So, forgive me not being impressed with 1K per charge.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 13, 2015 at 21:01 UTC
In reply to:

km25: This is good. Not a Sony hater, but a front running sensor maker, not so good at making cameras.

The very need for a high level of customizability, in my experience, is usually the result of a poorly (or barely) designed user interface. I want to be able to use a camera efficiently within minutes of picking it up rather than spend an afternoon setting it up to be able to easily access basic and common functions. I always come away from encounters with Sonys feeling they are far more computers than cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 9, 2015 at 18:08 UTC
In reply to:

km25: This is good. Not a Sony hater, but a front running sensor maker, not so good at making cameras.

I hear ya. Likewise for a Sony camera that doesn't require me to carry twice its weight in spare batteries for a half-day shoot. Or a fully-fleshed system of native lenses. Or a vaguely intuitive, quick-to-use menu system.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 8, 2015 at 22:37 UTC
In reply to:

km25: This is good. Not a Sony hater, but a front running sensor maker, not so good at making cameras.

I'm a big fan of Sony sensors, and even very briefly owned an a900. But no amount of innovation or enthusiasm can hide the glaring problems with their SLT and mirrorless cameras: EVF and the consequently awful battery life, and until very recently, potentially visibly cooked RAW files. I suspect by the time they figure things out, Canon and Nikon will have settled on effective mirrorless strategies of their own and will remain dominant in the market.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 8, 2015 at 21:31 UTC
On article Sony brings uncompressed Raw to a7S II, a7R II and... (562 comments in total)
In reply to:

Valen305: I shoot with the A7R and A7RII and have yet to find any artifacts/issues due to compression. Maybe it's because I expose correctly in-camera and bracket when needed.

How practical or helpful is bracketing when you're handholding your camera and your subject is alive and moving, perhaps unpredictably? Not every camera is locked down on a tripod, pointed at static subject matter.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 15, 2015 at 20:41 UTC
In reply to:

Frank_BR: Why doesn't Sony have so far the option of a lossless RAW format? Most critics say that this is just a Sony error, but the question is not so simple. To try to understand better, I did an experiment. I took the RAW files from DPR Studio Scene for Sony 7RII and Nikon D810, and compressed them with WinRAR. The results were as follows:

Camera.....RAW original....WinRAR compr
7RII .........41.4MB...........38.3MB
D810 ........74.3MB..........43.9MB

WinRAR is a lossless compression, so the RARs files contain the same information as the RAWs from camera.

Surprisingly, WinRAR managed to reduce to almost half the size of NEF file, but failed to appreciably reduce the size of Sony RAW. This shows that NEF is inefficient since it produces much larger files than necessary. There is room for a better lossless RAW coding. I draw the conclusion that a reason for Sony has been reluctant to use a lossless RAW coding is that the current processor technology does not allow high efficiency of coding.

I'm actually quite happy with the flexibility of NEF files from the Nikon DSLRs I've known, so I'll assume Nikon know what they are doing and accept the larger files they delivery, along with the potential for superior image quality from difficult subject matter.

As a nearly exclusive RAW shooter, Sony's visibly lossy RAW compression scheme is yet another reason I don't seriously consider their digital photographic gear.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2015 at 16:51 UTC
In reply to:

dwill23: "This lens also features Nikon’s Electromagnetic Aperture for consistent exposures" Ohhh something Canon has done since 1987 with ALL their lenses, while Nikon bashed them, Nikon first copied IS, then motors in the lens "VR" now electromagnetic apertures. Dang. Better hope Sony doesn't pull those fantastic sensors away.....or start selling them to Canon. Read the lens reviews on this site, most Canon's are better. This lens is a joke, F5.6? Well, I guess if it's $500 it would be worth only using it in sun or bright cloudy days.

Actually, Nikon implemented its VR system (albeit in the compact Nikon Zoom 700 VR) in 1994, before Canon's EF 75-300mm F4-5.6 IS USM of 1995. Nikon also was first with in-lens AF motors and TTL phase-detection AF (at the time, Canon was stuck on IR-based AF–like with compact cameras), both introduced with 1983's F3 AF and its two AF lenses, AF 80mm f/2.8 and AF 200mm f/3.5 ED-IF (five years before the introduction of Canon's EF mount and lenses). As for electromagnetic apertures, Nikon has always been far more focused on backwards compatibility and that meant sticking with existing technologies where not doing so would disenfranchise large numbers of users, as Canon did when they moved from FD to EF mount, immediately obsoleting decades of prior Canon SLR lenses. I have little doubt Nikon engineers could long ago have implemented electromagnetic diaphragms has their objective been to abandon compatibility with earlier Nikon bodies and accessories.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 4, 2015 at 21:09 UTC
On article Adobe announces final Camera Raw update for CS6 owners (470 comments in total)

I have no interest in renting software, whether used personally or professionally. This is why I left Lightroom for Capture One and, ultimately, will leave InDesign for Quark XPress. So long as there are viable alternatives, I will use them. No point complaining when I can vote with my wallet.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 29, 2015 at 23:40 UTC as 25th comment | 1 reply
On SampleImage:0704017606 (1 comment in total)

Seems the CA toward the edges of the frame, at least at 24mm, is excessive. Is this easily corrected during conversion?

Posted on Jul 23, 2015 at 17:55 UTC as 1st comment
On a photo in the Sigma 24-35mm F2 DG HSM Art Real-World Samples sample gallery (1 comment in total)

Seems the CA toward the edges of the frame, at least at 24mm, is excessive. Is this easily corrected during conversion?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 23, 2015 at 17:55 UTC as 1st comment
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