Martin.au

Martin.au

Lives in Australia Adelaide, Australia
Joined on Jul 20, 2012

Comments

Total: 71, showing: 41 – 60
« First‹ Previous1234Next ›Last »
On CP+ 2013: Interview with Canon's Masaya Maeda article (489 comments in total)
In reply to:

MikeFairbanks: I've been involved in photography now since 2007, all digital. I take better pictures than someone new at it, but am a long way from being consistent in a variety of lighting situations. I am an intermediate.

As an amateur who shoots almost daily, I quit using point and shoots and video cameras. Done. I use my Iphone 4s for snapshots/video, and for quality I use a Nikon D7000. (I had some Rebels, which are just as good, but I happened to get a great deal on a Nikon).

My opinion is that manufacturers should focus on two things:

* Shift from APS-C to FF models at various price points/features.
* Smart phone cameras.

Everything else, to me, is a no-go. I won't buy them. I tried them (4/3, etc. Mirrorless), but it's too much of a compromise. I want a quality DSLR and a quality smart phone. I won't walk around with a P&S in one pocket and a phone in the other. The P&S days are numbered, and a mirrorless with a large sensor can't fit in pockets.

FF DSLR + Phone = Future

20 miles per day, over 10 days, through Scotland, with photography? Well, now where at the stage where I say prove it.

You reckon you can tell the difference between photos? Care to have a shot at a blind test? I'll put one together in the m4/3 forum if you like.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 2, 2013 at 21:19 UTC
On CP+ 2013: Interview with Canon's Masaya Maeda article (489 comments in total)
In reply to:

MikeFairbanks: I've been involved in photography now since 2007, all digital. I take better pictures than someone new at it, but am a long way from being consistent in a variety of lighting situations. I am an intermediate.

As an amateur who shoots almost daily, I quit using point and shoots and video cameras. Done. I use my Iphone 4s for snapshots/video, and for quality I use a Nikon D7000. (I had some Rebels, which are just as good, but I happened to get a great deal on a Nikon).

My opinion is that manufacturers should focus on two things:

* Shift from APS-C to FF models at various price points/features.
* Smart phone cameras.

Everything else, to me, is a no-go. I won't buy them. I tried them (4/3, etc. Mirrorless), but it's too much of a compromise. I want a quality DSLR and a quality smart phone. I won't walk around with a P&S in one pocket and a phone in the other. The P&S days are numbered, and a mirrorless with a large sensor can't fit in pockets.

FF DSLR + Phone = Future

I think we have different definitions of hiking. It sounds more like you're planning on "going for walks with a camera" as I'd describe it.
Anyway, you're at about 4kg, not including accessories and a bag to stash it in.

I put together a m4/3 kit covering the same range of focal lengths (and then some), with good glass.
Pana 7-14, Pana 12-35, Pana 35-100 and Oly 75-300 with an OM-D comes to 1.82kg, and about 60% of the cost.
Or, to more closely match the focal lengths.
Pana 7-14, Oly 12-60 with adaptor, Oly 75-300, Oly 12mm and an OM-D. This also weighs about 2kg.

This just leaves two questions.

1) Will it be possible to tell the difference between the photos from the two systems. Without a giveaway such as exif or MP count, I think it would be pretty hard to pick which system took which photos.

2) What to do with my spare 2.2kg? I could take a spare OM-D body, the Oly 60mm macro, a flash, LED macro arms, the 25mm f1.4 Panaleica, an iPad and a can of Coke.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 2, 2013 at 07:44 UTC
In reply to:

kayone: Math is wrong on the 42.5 caption, should be an 85mm f 2.4 equivalent

This would be so much easier if you two would stop equivocating and specify DOF equivalence or exposure.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 2, 2013 at 02:10 UTC
In reply to:

kayone: Math is wrong on the 42.5 caption, should be an 85mm f 2.4 equivalent

Well, they specified DOF equivalent, not exposure, on their caption. Context matters.

Viking79. Depends what you're trying to do and what you consider important.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 2, 2013 at 01:55 UTC
In reply to:

kayone: Math is wrong on the 42.5 caption, should be an 85mm f 2.4 equivalent

Oh
Is 90mm what you usually get when you double 42.5, Chekr?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 2, 2013 at 01:25 UTC

Panasonic is doing some pretty awesome work with the m4/3 lenses.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 2, 2013 at 00:56 UTC as 66th comment | 4 replies
On CP+ 2013: Interview with Canon's Masaya Maeda article (489 comments in total)
In reply to:

MikeFairbanks: I've been involved in photography now since 2007, all digital. I take better pictures than someone new at it, but am a long way from being consistent in a variety of lighting situations. I am an intermediate.

As an amateur who shoots almost daily, I quit using point and shoots and video cameras. Done. I use my Iphone 4s for snapshots/video, and for quality I use a Nikon D7000. (I had some Rebels, which are just as good, but I happened to get a great deal on a Nikon).

My opinion is that manufacturers should focus on two things:

* Shift from APS-C to FF models at various price points/features.
* Smart phone cameras.

Everything else, to me, is a no-go. I won't buy them. I tried them (4/3, etc. Mirrorless), but it's too much of a compromise. I want a quality DSLR and a quality smart phone. I won't walk around with a P&S in one pocket and a phone in the other. The P&S days are numbered, and a mirrorless with a large sensor can't fit in pockets.

FF DSLR + Phone = Future

Bet you aren't taking the long glass then.
What lenses are you taking?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2013 at 23:09 UTC
On CP+ 2013: Interview with Canon's Masaya Maeda article (489 comments in total)
In reply to:

MikeFairbanks: I've been involved in photography now since 2007, all digital. I take better pictures than someone new at it, but am a long way from being consistent in a variety of lighting situations. I am an intermediate.

As an amateur who shoots almost daily, I quit using point and shoots and video cameras. Done. I use my Iphone 4s for snapshots/video, and for quality I use a Nikon D7000. (I had some Rebels, which are just as good, but I happened to get a great deal on a Nikon).

My opinion is that manufacturers should focus on two things:

* Shift from APS-C to FF models at various price points/features.
* Smart phone cameras.

Everything else, to me, is a no-go. I won't buy them. I tried them (4/3, etc. Mirrorless), but it's too much of a compromise. I want a quality DSLR and a quality smart phone. I won't walk around with a P&S in one pocket and a phone in the other. The P&S days are numbered, and a mirrorless with a large sensor can't fit in pockets.

FF DSLR + Phone = Future

What does m4/3s do that FF can't?

It goes places. :P

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2013 at 22:44 UTC
In reply to:

NZ Scott: An interesting stragegy by Olympus to re-issue the lens with a US $350 price drop.

Why?

Here are my thoughts:

1) They're worried about the new Tamron 75-300 for m43, which has almost identical specs.

2) People simply weren't buying the old 75-300 because it was too expensive, and everyone knows what happens when supply exceeds demand.

3) Lots of people were buying the old 75-300, so they cranked up their production lines and economies of scale allowed them to drop the price.

4) They are planning to release a high-grade telephoto lens soon, and want to make room for it at a higher price point.

Myself, I'm hoping that number 4 is the main reason.

What Tamron?

I suspect it's more due to Panasonic taking the majority of the superzoom market with their 100-300.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 30, 2013 at 08:17 UTC
In reply to:

avbee: additional of glasses will degrade some quality. even the best coating and best material of UV will degrade the quality of the picture........

So, following this logic - each addition of glass results in a negative net result, the very best lenses should have a minimum number of elements in them.

Oh wait, that's not right. Want to try again.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 18, 2013 at 05:19 UTC
In reply to:

ThomasSwitzerland: As I am doing photography since more than 40 years, I have many first rate classic lenses left (from Nikon, Zeiss to Leica). I tried them by adapters (with lens, without lens) fixed to many: Canon FF, Nikon FF, Oly MFT, Pana FT, Digital Crops Nikon etc. I am not a scientific lab because it’s my hobby. But none of those adapted lenses matched digital sensor requirements. Center might be ok, but that’s it.

If you have an amount of material (your lense) and put another material (lenses by adapter system) in addition between, the output compared to the input is less. Some specifications may be lifted, others will suffer more. The net result is negative. Save your $$$ and buy for the USD 600 savings (from this funny adapter) a good lens for digital to enjoy. There are excellent quality offers.

Digital is the future, adapters are out. Don’t fall in love with things which cannot deliver.

So, following this logic - each addition of material results in a negative net result, the very best lenses should have a minimum number of elements in them.

Oh wait, that's not right. Want to try again.

Lets also not forget that this technology has been used in the past on both Nikon E series and apparently Olympus SHG zooms.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 17, 2013 at 21:19 UTC
In reply to:

Francis Carver: Well, it sounds like optical magic -- or hocus-pocus, depending how we are looking at it. But US$599 is definitely too much for it, and I suspect even US$59.99 is a bit too much.

Considering that for instance Rainbow Imaging M4/3 lens mount adapters go from $4 to about $35 a pop, I think 40 bucks for the MetaBones adapter would be much more like it. At that price, I would give it a try.

So, it's optical magic but the price is too high.

Damn, I always considered good engineering and design worth paying for. I have never tried to place a price on magic, but I'd have thought it would be quite high.

I suppose you also consider teleconverters to be worth only $40 or so. A reality check may be in order.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 17, 2013 at 03:41 UTC
In reply to:

bobbarber: To all the, ahem..., rocket scientists who continue to argue that this device improves the resolution of the native lens, because it projects the information captured onto a smaller area, so there are more lines of resolution per unit area:

I had no idea that the lens on my crappy Canon SX230 HS "Out-resolved" a Nikon D800, because my tiny, fingernail-sized sensor has more information per unit area than the Nikon.

I had no idea that a wider field of view put "more information" into the scene. I thought it just meant that you were taking a different picture. What's amazing to me is that I can take a closeup of a house, then make that house tiny in another picture, and the same amount of information about the house is in both pictures! I don't take away information from the house in the first picture, and replace it with other information in the secon, no, I just keep on adding information!

The alternative is to think that you guys are rather slow, but that's obviously not so.

"That is exactly what people are saying. Please read the thread. People have posted that this adapter will increase the resolution of the lenses that it is attached to." - bob

Really. Got any examples. If so, why not correct them accurately, rather than this mishmash of confusion you've been demonstrating so far. Seems to me that the person who's been most ambiguous with the terms "resolution" and "information" is you

Direct link | Posted on Jan 16, 2013 at 23:16 UTC
In reply to:

bobbarber: To all the, ahem..., rocket scientists who continue to argue that this device improves the resolution of the native lens, because it projects the information captured onto a smaller area, so there are more lines of resolution per unit area:

I had no idea that the lens on my crappy Canon SX230 HS "Out-resolved" a Nikon D800, because my tiny, fingernail-sized sensor has more information per unit area than the Nikon.

I had no idea that a wider field of view put "more information" into the scene. I thought it just meant that you were taking a different picture. What's amazing to me is that I can take a closeup of a house, then make that house tiny in another picture, and the same amount of information about the house is in both pictures! I don't take away information from the house in the first picture, and replace it with other information in the secon, no, I just keep on adding information!

The alternative is to think that you guys are rather slow, but that's obviously not so.

Bob, no one is saying it will capture more than the FF sensor. That's your own dumb arise misconception.

Maybe lay off the snide commentary until you know what you're talking about. Right now you look like an imbecile.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 16, 2013 at 14:37 UTC
In reply to:

bobbarber: To all the, ahem..., rocket scientists who continue to argue that this device improves the resolution of the native lens, because it projects the information captured onto a smaller area, so there are more lines of resolution per unit area:

I had no idea that the lens on my crappy Canon SX230 HS "Out-resolved" a Nikon D800, because my tiny, fingernail-sized sensor has more information per unit area than the Nikon.

I had no idea that a wider field of view put "more information" into the scene. I thought it just meant that you were taking a different picture. What's amazing to me is that I can take a closeup of a house, then make that house tiny in another picture, and the same amount of information about the house is in both pictures! I don't take away information from the house in the first picture, and replace it with other information in the secon, no, I just keep on adding information!

The alternative is to think that you guys are rather slow, but that's obviously not so.

Well. Numerous people have tried explaining this to you, sometimes using very simple concepts. I'm not sure it can be dumbed down any further.

Keep up the good fight. It's always fun watching headstrong idiots failing to grasp a concept and then rationalizing away any attempt to correct their ignorance.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 16, 2013 at 13:49 UTC
In reply to:

bobbarber: Wow! A resolution advantage!

That means I can take a picture of my T.V. screen, and the information which comes out the back image of the lens, the T.V. screen in real life, IS NOT THE LIMIT OF DETAIL WHICH I CAN HOPE TO CAPTURE!

I just put this handy-dandy little thing on the back of a lens, and DETAILS WHICH WERE NOT CAPTURED FROM REAL LIFE BY THE LENS BECOME APPARENT! THE T.V. SCREEN SHOWS MORE DETAILS IN THE PICTURE USING THIS ADAPTER, THAN IT DOES IN REAL LIFE! AMAZING!

I thought this adapter was a neat idea even when it appeared that the laws of physics would limit it to increasing effective aperture at the (slight) expense of detail. But this thing actually conjures up MORE detail than the lens itself captures! Wow! Gee-whillikers! I'm so excited, I just whacked my knee and my falsies fell out!

Please stop mixing up the resolving power of the lens with the resolution of the sensor bobbarber.

As I said, understand first, then criticise.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 16, 2013 at 04:45 UTC
In reply to:

bobbarber: Wow! A resolution advantage!

That means I can take a picture of my T.V. screen, and the information which comes out the back image of the lens, the T.V. screen in real life, IS NOT THE LIMIT OF DETAIL WHICH I CAN HOPE TO CAPTURE!

I just put this handy-dandy little thing on the back of a lens, and DETAILS WHICH WERE NOT CAPTURED FROM REAL LIFE BY THE LENS BECOME APPARENT! THE T.V. SCREEN SHOWS MORE DETAILS IN THE PICTURE USING THIS ADAPTER, THAN IT DOES IN REAL LIFE! AMAZING!

I thought this adapter was a neat idea even when it appeared that the laws of physics would limit it to increasing effective aperture at the (slight) expense of detail. But this thing actually conjures up MORE detail than the lens itself captures! Wow! Gee-whillikers! I'm so excited, I just whacked my knee and my falsies fell out!

It's really quite simple.

Lens on a crop camera = photograph of your TV.
Lens on the adapter = photograph of your TV + the surrounding area that is usually cropped out.

Basically you're using the entire 35mm image circle, rather than just the section that falls on the crop camera's sensor.

No one is making the claim that it will collect more detail than a FF camera. That's your own misinterpretation. It will collect almost the same detail as a FF camera, but on a smaller sensor.

As for resolution, consider this thought exercise.
You have a lens that can resolve to 1mm.
You photograph a ruler with a FF camera and get a photo of 0-30cm, with 1mm resolution visible - a resolution of 300 lines across the photo.
Now you photograph the same ruler with a crop camera and get a photo from (approx) 8-22cm - giving you a resolution of 240 lines.
Add the adaptor and get almost the same photo as from the full frame. 0-30cm with 300 lines.
There's the increase in resolution 240 -> 300.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 16, 2013 at 01:15 UTC
In reply to:

bobbarber: Wow! A resolution advantage!

That means I can take a picture of my T.V. screen, and the information which comes out the back image of the lens, the T.V. screen in real life, IS NOT THE LIMIT OF DETAIL WHICH I CAN HOPE TO CAPTURE!

I just put this handy-dandy little thing on the back of a lens, and DETAILS WHICH WERE NOT CAPTURED FROM REAL LIFE BY THE LENS BECOME APPARENT! THE T.V. SCREEN SHOWS MORE DETAILS IN THE PICTURE USING THIS ADAPTER, THAN IT DOES IN REAL LIFE! AMAZING!

I thought this adapter was a neat idea even when it appeared that the laws of physics would limit it to increasing effective aperture at the (slight) expense of detail. But this thing actually conjures up MORE detail than the lens itself captures! Wow! Gee-whillikers! I'm so excited, I just whacked my knee and my falsies fell out!

Understand first. Then criticise.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 16, 2013 at 00:24 UTC
On Best Camera of 2012: And the Winner is... article (1412 comments in total)
In reply to:

lpv: back to the post: Olympus OM-D - nail sized sensor; electronic viewfinder inferior to OLED displays in Sony's NEX-7 and SLTs which are inferior to real viewfinders anyway;
not enough highlight range leaving you with washed out highlights with no details

http://www.flickr.com/photos/89996031@N04/8179994177/in/photostream

not enough highlight range to handle "digital ring" around the sun and that can be easily seen in second picture made with this Olympus

http://www.flickr.com/photos/89996031@N04/8179996303/in/photostream

overall: good camera for taking snaps of your feet, markers, muesli, cereal etc :)

Ahh, I see, so if you give any random person a "real camera" like a D800, you will never get shots with blown highlights, or other such issues. By this logic, photographic skill is all about the tool, and nothing about the photographer.

Get a clue.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 5, 2013 at 06:34 UTC
On Best Camera of 2012: And the Winner is... article (1412 comments in total)
In reply to:

soaked-in-color: I have simple curiosity. Please pardon my ignorance. If we trust DPREVIEW (lets keep the user poll, brand loyalty, fan club etc. aside for a moment) then I wonder whether we have faith in their review method.

Dynamic range:
Isn't the wider range in the Gray Bar says better DR? I chose Pentax K-5, Nikon D800 and Canon 5D Mark-III for comparison. I chose OM-D for Gradation Auto, K-5 Highlight DR On, D800 ADL auto and 5D HTP on.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympusem5/18

Which one is better? Sorry I am not so familiar with this tool. Just curious to compare these products following the DPREVIEW lab test after seeing this interesting forum.

Also I compared the RAW image resolution with these three cameras on the test page:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympusem5/21

I could not see any significant difference till ISO 1600. As a matter of fact OM-D looks better to me in some cases. Are these cameras technically so close to each other that not worth fighting with each other?

Pretty much.

I've seen a few blind tests between the OMD and various FF cameras on these forums Most people will not be able to identify which camera is which from crops of the photos.

A FF camera will be able to take better photos in a wider range of conditions simply because it's sensor has 4x the area of the 4/3 cameras, which can be splurged on larger photosites or more of them. However for the vast majority of photos taken these days, it really doesn't matter.

It's like the argument for medium format cameras - Yes they take better photos, however most people were happy with 35mm.

Now it's FF vs 4/3. Yes, FF technically take better photos, however, most people would be happy with 4/3 (and as mentioned, most people will have trouble telling the difference).

IMO, it's now at the stage where the camera is irrelevant and it's the photographer's skill that makes a good photo, as opposed to a few years back where good photos could well be ruined by simply not having a good camera.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 5, 2013 at 05:13 UTC
Total: 71, showing: 41 – 60
« First‹ Previous1234Next ›Last »