Dave Oddie

Dave Oddie

Lives in United Kingdom Chester, United Kingdom
Works as a IT
Joined on Jan 23, 2002

Comments

Total: 251, showing: 41 – 60
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On Samsung NX1 real-world sample images article (330 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Samsung already owns much of the camera market via cell phones. It's obvious from the specs that Samsung also is trying to be a leader in serious system cameras, and the sample images show that they haven't screwed-up very much. I look forward to a teardown, which I expect will reveal that this is almost entirely made from Samsung parts and subsystems. In the near future, how will other camera companies compete against the targeted resources of arguably the world's largest tech company?

Here's hoping this is a motivating challenge to companies like Canon, and not the big, bright, thing in the sky that causes a mass extinction when it hits.

"It's not the count (quantity) that counts, but the quality. A system can be very strong with even a moderate amount of lenses - see for example Fuji X."

I have been able to assemble a lens set that suits me in Sony A mount of very high quality lenses including CZ 16-80 and 70-300G to name two but that is me.

For FF users there a gaps for Sony A mount and E mount is worse and if a manufacturer doesn't make a lens you need and your mount is not supported well by Sigma and Tamron then it doesn't matter how good the quality is of the lenses they do make.

I don't see a great deal of difference between Samsung and Sony E mount at the moment. Officially I think Samsung have 19 lenses but several are standard zooms of different specs and there is nothing over 200mm.

I certainly could not replicate my Sony A mount lens set in the NX system at this time.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 19, 2014 at 23:09 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 Review preview (814 comments in total)

This is the kind of camera I can see people buying as a compliment to a dslr outfit and then hardly ever using the dslr outfit.

There is one caveat to that though and it is that problem highlighted in the review about the single control dial. Anyone used to dual dials with exposure compensation on one and aperture the other for example (as I have my camera set up) would be driven mad by this ergonomic compromise. And that kind of thing can actually spoil your enjoyment of the using the gear.

People naturally and unconsciously gravitate to well designed easy to use kit.

On a more general point this and the RX10 are obviously intended to be great travel cameras so why no GPS?

I use it all the time on my camera and it seems an obvious feature to have on a travel camera.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 19, 2014 at 00:01 UTC as 24th comment | 3 replies
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 Review preview (814 comments in total)
In reply to:

AmateurSnaps: I love the idea of a bridge camera but at this price what are the advantages of this camera over a Canon/Nikon/Sony with for example the Tamron 16-300mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD Macro?

"I discovered a very good reason! Take a handhold shot of a night scene with 600 equivalent focal lenght and 1/30s or slower with this camera and with a DSLR. Look at the pictures in detail and you´ll notice that the DSLR give vertical lines on each luminous point from the city lamps while Lumix keep the lamps as points. This is due the vertical oscilation created by the mirror shock."

Not with a Sony SLT or any of the mirrorless competition. They don't have flapping mirrors either. Some like the Sony SLT's, even have electronic first curtain shutters reducing any potential vibration even more.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2014 at 23:49 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review preview (898 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dave Oddie: One day some manufacturer will make a zoom lens on a camera like this that doesn't stop short at 70mm or 75mm equivalent.

I am sure an aperture of F2.8 at the long end of 90mm equivalent won't result in a huge lens. You could even compromise and have it at F3.5 while still be F2.8 for considerable way towards the telephoto end with the lens even longer at say 105mm equivalent.

There are 24-70 FF lenses, 16-50 aps-c lenses and now this 12-37.5 zoom and they all stop short.

What happened to the standard zoom going to 85mm equivalent, the first proper portrait focal length?

Add the 37.5mm long end to 12mp and you can't even crop that much.

I thought Sony took a step back by losing the long end of the zoom on the RX100 III. Same story with this camera for me.

Now if a MkII came out with a slower 24-105 equivalent on the front, where do I sign up?

"Most people didn't think Sony took a step back with the faster lens on the RX100III."

How do you know that? Most review sites mentioned it as at least a compromise.

I have never understood how 70mm gained any popularity. Back in the days of film I remember 35-70 being some of the first standard zooms but only because optically no one had worked out how to make lenses with a bigger range of any quality. Nikon had a 43-86 which was utter rubbish.

When Canikon went digital they did so with aps-c and had zero designed-for-aps-c lenses so people started calling 50mm lenses "portrait" lenses. They aren't yet this 70/75mm length has stuck even in FF where we see 24-70mm lenses.

We regularly see launches of 16-50 lenses on aps-c because they want F2.8 or to make them very small and the Rx100 III and the LX100 offer up a similar compromise, in my opinion, in their respective formats.

I much prefer the wider range of my 16-80.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2014 at 23:29 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review preview (898 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I wonder why they couldn’t have produced a camera like this a few years ago. I know the auto focus tech was not as good and you wouldn’t have had the 4K video. However, couldn’t they have put a 4/3s inch sensor in this size body back then?

Could they have produced this lens a few years back? Were they just waiting for the software correcting technology to catch-up with this lens design?

I have often thought along these lines. Maybe they didn't think sensors of this size offered enough to warrant it but I can't see why physically it cold not have been done.

Going the other way, to interchangeable lenses instead of fixed, it seems to have taken equally long for that to arrive in small sensor cameras. I am thinking of the Nikon 1 and Pentax small sensor cameras here.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2014 at 22:00 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review preview (898 comments in total)

One day some manufacturer will make a zoom lens on a camera like this that doesn't stop short at 70mm or 75mm equivalent.

I am sure an aperture of F2.8 at the long end of 90mm equivalent won't result in a huge lens. You could even compromise and have it at F3.5 while still be F2.8 for considerable way towards the telephoto end with the lens even longer at say 105mm equivalent.

There are 24-70 FF lenses, 16-50 aps-c lenses and now this 12-37.5 zoom and they all stop short.

What happened to the standard zoom going to 85mm equivalent, the first proper portrait focal length?

Add the 37.5mm long end to 12mp and you can't even crop that much.

I thought Sony took a step back by losing the long end of the zoom on the RX100 III. Same story with this camera for me.

Now if a MkII came out with a slower 24-105 equivalent on the front, where do I sign up?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2014 at 21:52 UTC as 200th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

aris14: Ι hate proprietary flash shoes...

The are all proprietary in some way if you want the advanced features the various cameras offer.

The real issue here is Sony changed the shoe from the old Minolta style seen on the A57/77/99 to the inferior multi-interface shoe used on newer cameras.

A completely pointless change given the new one is also a proprietary shoe anyway.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2014 at 14:20 UTC
On Samsung NX1 real-world sample images article (330 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Samsung already owns much of the camera market via cell phones. It's obvious from the specs that Samsung also is trying to be a leader in serious system cameras, and the sample images show that they haven't screwed-up very much. I look forward to a teardown, which I expect will reveal that this is almost entirely made from Samsung parts and subsystems. In the near future, how will other camera companies compete against the targeted resources of arguably the world's largest tech company?

Here's hoping this is a motivating challenge to companies like Canon, and not the big, bright, thing in the sky that causes a mass extinction when it hits.

Samsung's approach to the smartphone market would not be a yardstick I would want to use as a recommendation for them as a camera maker.

They add too much unintuitive crud on the top of Android and unlike HTC who's tweaks seem to add genuine value Samsung doesn't appeal. I actually use Nexus 5 myself just so you know I am not an Apple ot HTC apologist.

As to the camera I think on paper it looks fantastic specification wise. I hope the decision to go to 28mp pushing the envelope even further doesn't back fire.

As with and SLR type camera once the camera body is deemed OK the key issue is always the lenses and unfortunately few makers can match Canikon in this department in terms of range. I suffer from this myself as a Sony A mount user (E mount is ever worse for native lenses) so I'd be wary of moving to a new system equally or even more sparse on the lens front.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2014 at 16:05 UTC
In reply to:

ogl: It's strange for me that there are users who could be happy with new very slow zoom.

Well it''s slightly slower then my CZ 16-80 (used on a 24mp sensor, Sony A77) which is F4.5 at the long end but it is an extremely useful focal length range to have.

If this lens is as sharp as my CZ pentax users will have a nice new lens to add to the lineup.

In my case the alternatives are at stop an a bit faster at the long end at F2.8 but you lose 30mm of range to get it. I don't see much point in 16-50 F2.8's and if you really want speed you still need fast primes.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 30, 2014 at 11:10 UTC
In reply to:

Karl Summers: No need for this when you can buy a 5TB home cloud storage unit.

Can't believe the complacent replies to Pnakotus here.

However you do it, off-site backup is a completely sensible precaution to take.

And not for just reasons like your house burning down or theft etc but to protect yourself from your own occasional idiocy where you accidentally destroy important images.

Whether Microsoft Cloud Storage would be a suitable offsite backup option is another debate.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 29, 2014 at 09:43 UTC
On Google launches Nexus 6 with 13MP and OIS post (101 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tonkotsu Ramen: At that price...... it will not sell well..

Well in the UK buying a phone that isn't on a contract can be much cheaper. The Nexus 5 did turn up on contract offerings but you would have been mad to go there. With a price of just over 330 quid you would have paid for it twice on the typical monthly contract.

If the 6 is priced so high then that changes things.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 20, 2014 at 01:08 UTC
On Google launches Nexus 6 with 13MP and OIS post (101 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tonkotsu Ramen: At that price...... it will not sell well..

The price was why I bought a Nexus 5. It's a great device in my opinion and is still well specified v other phones. Not interested in a phone the size of the Nexus 6 anyway but if I was, the price if it comes to the UK at £500-£600 is an invitation to look at the competition. With the Nexus 5 that wasn't the case.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 16, 2014 at 08:26 UTC
On Nikon D750 real-world samples gallery posted article (348 comments in total)
In reply to:

Hugo808: It's got to the point where I can't tell the difference between cameras at all. If you told me these were taken with a 1" compact I would just nod and turn the page.

That they are full frame shots makes me impressed that the field has been levelled so much. But not that I'd be better off spending a lot on a new camera, not for reasons of IQ anyway....

MG89, you may have experienced a narrower dynamic range meaning in your case if the subject was exposed correctly the sky was blown out.

don't think it follows only FF cameras can be engineered to have a wider dynamic range.

Canon seem to suffer here on FF compared to others for example so I don't think FF guarantees good DR.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 9, 2014 at 15:27 UTC
On Canon PowerShot G7 X real-world samples gallery posted article (242 comments in total)
In reply to:

Wye Photography: IF I had to choose between the G7X, RX100 Marque III and LX100 and after viewing sample images from all three, the one I think has the X Factor is the LX100.

@Cain24 "Sure, for those who like to carry cameras in pockets. But there are those of us who will use pouches or small camera bags regardless, which does in fact put all those cameras under the same umbrella of consideration."

If you want to carry a small bag as opposed to have a pocketable camera then why limit yourself to the LX100? There are several m43 cameras of similar size that let you change the lens and the lens in the LX100 is not remarkable enough in my opinion to justify being fixed (and the size of the camera doesn't benefit from it either).

It may have other features such as 4K video others do not at the moment but surely it is only going to be a short time before these features are matched on interchangeable lens m43 cameras which will render the LX100 obsolete,

Direct link | Posted on Oct 8, 2014 at 12:23 UTC
In reply to:

Zvonimir Tosic: The new LX100 has a appeal over other Panasonic m4/3 cameras because of the influence of Leica is far more prominent in it: from the new lens, to the layout of the controls.
This is indeed a collaboration of the sort they once had in the DMC-LC1 era, and I am glad they have renewed the spirit of it. And considering the LC1 which employes 2/3" sensor was priced at $1599 at its delivery in 2004, today's LX100 with all its features is a bargain.

I bet the only collaboration Leica had/have with the LX100 is sticking their own badge on their version.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 12:41 UTC

Glad DPR asked this question as I posted a similar one in the comments section when the camera came out.

I think they are being a bit disingenuous though in justifying the LX100 essentially on the back of its lens. A range of 24-75 mm and F2.8 at the long end is too limiting.

My standard lens is a 16-80 CZ on an A77 and it gets used a lot at focal lengths longer than 50mm (75mm equivalent).

And no you don't have to buy super fast lenses to make a case for the GX7.

Things like 4K video (if you use it) are evolutionary and I'd expect to see it on a "GX7 II" or whatever its replacement is.

The other problem I see is these cameras are not that small. So the LX100 being about the same size as the GX7 puts them both out of the "buy because they are small" category in my book when there are smaller m43 cameras from both Pana and Oly (that don't have fixed lenses either) and cameras that really are pocketable like the Sony RX100.

For me the LX100 is obsolete already.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 11:10 UTC as 99th comment | 3 replies
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II: Real-world samples (beta) article (268 comments in total)
In reply to:

xiox8: So three things I am interested in understanding before making the decision to buy.

1. As I understand it the spot metering does not use the actual chosen AF point? How would that work with birds?
2. I have a 400mm f5.6 lens and I noticed that some of the increased AF function in the center requires an f2.8 lens to be utilized. Is this going to neutralize the AF improvements for me?
3. I have read that the sensor is a derivative of the 70D which does not have stellar noise characteristics, so I want to see a DXO review. Although I saw a Matt Granger review that sounded favorable regards noise.

Any comments on the above would be appreciated.

Thanks

You would never use spot metering with birds (in flight that is).

It does what it says on the tin and meters from the centre spot of the frame.

So with a bird in flight you might miss the bird with the spot and so end up exposing for the sky.

You typically use it on more static subjects in difficult lighting situations that may fool the metering. For example a back lit portrait you can spot meter the face to determine the correct exposure for the face locking the spot reading with the AEL button then recomposing.

Or you use it to take several readings from around the scene and average them out avoiding extreme lighting (some Oly camera let you do this).

There is nothing deficient here as regards the way the spot metering works. It is doing exactly as it should, metering from the centre spot always.

It could be argued with today's sophisticated exposure metering there is less need for it (and even less again if your camera has an EVF where what you see is what you get).

Direct link | Posted on Oct 1, 2014 at 10:57 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II: Real-world samples (beta) article (268 comments in total)
In reply to:

Canon2: I try to answer the xiox8-questions:
1. As I understand it when you use spot metering, the camera focus firstly and then just before the picture is taken the light is messured around the AF point that was chosen. Either you chosed it or the camera did.
2. Your 400 mm wont use the center AF point in double cross mode, but in cross mode along with many other cross type AF ponits. Double cross neads 2.8.

Spot metering means taking a meter reading from the centre of the frame. In true spot metering the "spot" will be 1% of the frame though many manufacturers who offer it have used up to say 5%. Some cameras have the spot metering circle etched into the viewfinder.

What it should never do is wander off and follow the focus point to elsewhere in the frame. That is NOT spot metering.

Wide area metering often works like that in that if you set wide area metering the camera will often link the metering to the focus point it chooses. Again, this is NOT spot metering.

If Ken Rockwell thinks it is a paradox the spot metering is only from the center sensor and "AF-point linked spot metering isn't there" just means he doesn't know what he is talking about or at the very least has his terminology totally screwed up.

If he means the metering is not linked to the focus point when wide area metering is selected then he describes this very poorly confusing it with spot metering.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 1, 2014 at 10:48 UTC
On Opinion: Bring on the 70-200mm equivalents article (340 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dave Oddie: Aren't these lenses a throwback to a former era? Just because in the days of film 70-200 F2.8's were kind of state of the art in terms of fast tele zooms why on smaller sensors do we want to replicate that particular focal length range on a 50-150 or whatever?

I don't consider F2.8 fast for focal length on 150 even in a zoom and you can get 50-200 lenses that are a stop slower at 150 (i.e. F4) so given the superior high ISO capabilities of modern sensors that in my opinion reduced the need even further. The 50-200's are cheap to buy and a lot lighter and weight seems to be a factor in the article.

Depth of field, F2.8 v F4? There is virtually nothing in it at 50mm or 150mm.

Don't see the point myself.

I think in the days of film a 70-200 F2.8 was also a valid concept because if it let you shoot at ISO 200 in stead of 400 that was a genuine advantage much more so than applies today

The 50-150 F2.8s are not particularly light weight and so if you want to carry a lens of around 1kg or less what the article does for me is make a case for the 70-200 F4 zooms which are even lighter , not 50-150 F2.8s.

If speed is a requirement then something like the Oly 35-100 F2 makes more sense to me but then you are back to the weight issue which is 1.65kg

Direct link | Posted on Sep 25, 2014 at 10:18 UTC
On Sony shows off upcoming full-frame lenses at Photokina article (335 comments in total)

So to get a fisheye or a 21mm lens on E mount I'd have to buy two converters and a 28mm lens!!!

I thought converter lenses were what you attached to cheaper fixed lens cameras not D-SLR prime lenses.

What is more 28mm is a focal length I have never been keen on since back in the days of film preferring 24mm and 35mm lenses so it wouldn't see much use without one of the converters.

Sony need to bite the bullet and make a range of lenses such as 16mm fisheye, 17mm (or 18mm), 21mm, 24mm, 28mm and 35mm.

I know they do some of these already but with the 35mm it's either a huge and expensive 1.4 or the small and slow F2.8. One of THE most popular lenses in the old Minolta stable was a 35mm F2. I suppose Zeiss do an MF version but come on, apply some logic to the lens line up and do not leave gaps served by converters.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 25, 2014 at 09:00 UTC as 39th comment | 1 reply
Total: 251, showing: 41 – 60
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