Dave Oddie

Dave Oddie

Lives in United Kingdom Chester, United Kingdom
Works as a IT
Joined on Jan 23, 2002

Comments

Total: 180, showing: 41 – 60
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
In reply to:

FriendlyWalkabout: @Dpreview
Dxo also reviewed this lens on nex-7. I don’t understand how it can get a phenomenal 29/36 mp resolution on the A7r while only getting 15/24 mp result on the Nex 7. I understand the nex 7 has anti aliasing filter, but it wouldn't make that big a difference would it? I see the very cheap canon eosm 22mm lens scores a relatively better 13/18 mp. Please help me understand.

I don't look at the dxo site much but if I recall correctly the same lens always gets a higher rating on full frame than on aps-c regardless of make. (justs checked and the Nikon 58mm f1.4 is has a higher rating on the 610 than on the 7100)

As to the Sony lens. Nice short portrait lens on aps-c but 55mm is too long for a standard lens on full frame for me personally. I never liked 50mm never mind 55mm when I shot film.

The very compact A7 is crying out for a 40mm F2 pancake style lens.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2014 at 12:07 UTC
On Iconic photographer Don McCullin on war and landscapes article (75 comments in total)
In reply to:

greypixelz: sad he had to reach this age in order to understand that suffering and horror is not 'photojournalism' or 'the public's right to be informed'.
there is such a thing as human dignity and dying is part of it. photographing death or any kind of suffering for public display is undignified and disqualifies the photographer as a human being.
man should be immortalized on the highest peaks, not the deepest of valleys. this whole culture of decay and death is satanic in nature and goes against what man really is. the spirit of humanity is about rising from the abyss, not falling in it.
God bless you all!

greypixelz: "he and others like him, did NOTHING to help those people in need, just like the media is a propaganda machine for corporations looking for your sympathy and reaching for your wallets and ending up taking your souls."

You need to get a bit of perspective and equating what he did to corporate avarice and a society dominated by a plutocracy today ignores many things not least the time in history he operated and the effect his and other photos had on shaping attitudes to things like the Vietnam war.

You and I know there is plenty of suffering in the world. We still spend a fortune on our hobby, buy TV's, cars and everything else.

Iconic images like the famous photo of the badly burned Kim Phuc from the Vietnam war shape public opinion.

The photographer who took that image took her and others to hospital. Would you prefer the photo was not taken and they just ferried the injured to hospital?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 31, 2014 at 10:20 UTC
On AP cuts ties with Pulitzer-winning photographer article (170 comments in total)
In reply to:

sik_photos: It is almost universally acceptable to crop a photo. It is also historically accepted to dodge and burn a photo in the darkroom (or digitally)to enhance the quality of the image without changing the essence of the news, preserving the message of the image. In this case the removal of the camera in the corner of the image has zero to do with the communication of news events.
All "reporting" ,including photography, involves a conscious editing of reality, what you choose to show and what you choose not to show, the context into which you place things, and more, and among such choices and all are subjective. To even choose which images to publish (or send to your publisher) are editing choices. All photographers and their employers know this.

It would be quite naive to believe that this type of editing, photoshop pixel manipulation, does not happen all the time; I suspect there is something else going on in the decision to end working with this photographer.

"It has everything to do with communication of news events. Now it is clear to me that this image was not taken in "the height of a battle" but it was staged. Like probably most pictures coming from that area."

I take your point but you would have been none the wiser had he been able to remove the camera by cropping were it in a different position in the frame and he would not have been sanctioned for doing that.

As to it being staged you may suggest that, but you don't know for sure. Photographers have been known to be right up there in the thick of the action so why there would not be a chance of a camera being caught in a photo in the thick of it I don't know.

What he should have done if the thought the camera spoiled the photo and it was not possible to crop it out is simply not submit the photo to AP.

As he did and AP concluded he had not done this on any other photo a warning would suffice IMO. Looks like AP wanted to make a point or use this an an excuse to ditch him

Direct link | Posted on Jan 27, 2014 at 10:53 UTC
On Pictures emerge showing widely-leaked Fujfilm 'X-T1' article (373 comments in total)
In reply to:

David0X: Why are people hung up about this "Oh, it must be Full Frame to be pro" crap?

35mm is totally arbitrary - based on the movie film , and remember, it used to Be called "miniature format" because it was so small. Roll film was small too. Quarter Plate was small before that... jeeze. Why was Half Plate called "Half Plate"? See if you can guess.

Unless you have an SLR (optical viewfinder limited by sensor size - no, not Fuji X) or a whole bunch of legacy glass (Nikon, Canon yes, Fuji X no) then there is no reason to bang on about "Full Frame" being pro.

Want a big sensor? Get a Phase One for goodness' sake.

"Seriously though, what point are you making? The bigger the sensor, the more light it collects. End of story. Full frame is an arbitrary point on the size scale, sure. So is APS-C or m4/3. If you're making out that size doesn't matter at all, just pop over to Connect and join everyone shooting with their cellphone."

The point is if an aps-c sensor gives good enough image quality that is all that matters. The fact smart phones don't does't mean aps-c cameras don't either.

One day we may end up with small sensors delivering all the image quality we ever need and making a full frame sensor using the same technology to get even better quality will be a waste of time. Are we at this point now? No but for some people aps-c is easily good enough and FF overkill already.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 24, 2014 at 16:42 UTC
In reply to:

Biggiep: So this is Nikon's equivalent pricewise of Canon's 35mm f/2 IS but f/1.8 and no VR. I'd rather have stabilization than 1.8, otherwise why not just get a Sigma 35mm f/1.4 when it's on sale instead? We all know Nikon never has sales unlike Canon.

"No VR on a fast 35, he complains to much laughter."

Why? Canon has it on its F2 which is hardly slow and as someone who has a camera with IBIS that meant my 28 F2 was stabilised I can vouch for the additional capability that a fast lens AND stabilization brings to the table.

I "laugh" at those who can't see this ;)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 7, 2014 at 11:23 UTC
On Fujifilm announces XF 10-24mm F4 R OIS wideangle zoom article (172 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dave Oddie: This looks to be another quality lens from Fuji but what all the makers seem to be be missing whether for mirror-less or just aps-c on d-slr's is a compact fixed focal length uwa prime.

On m43 that would be say a 8.5mm to give a f.o.v of a 17mm on FF and on aps-c say 11mm.

I use a Sony 11-18 on my A77 and the only reason I do is for the 11mm end really. My 16-80 takes me wide enough most of the time and if I need wider than 16mm it is usually 11mm.

The Sony is not a heavy lens at all and is rather underrated (very good geometry IMO) but still, I'd prefer a less bulky lens to lug about so a 11mm F3.5 would be great.

I just find it odd that for all sensors smaller than FF no matter what make you shoot the only way to get an ultra wide angle rectilinear lens is to buy a zoom.

peevee1, The result is a lens the size of the Fuji. If I was an X series or Nex owner I might be tempted by that Zeiss mentioned by PatMann but the point still stands.

Bar that lens which is available in just two mounts you have to buy a zoom if you want UWA on aps-c and smaller sensors.

They may be easy to make (really!?) but they are still bulky lenses and you won't find a prime this wide for smaller format Nikon/Sony/Pentax/Sigma d-slr cameras.

I used ot own an Olympus 18mm F3.5 film lens for my oM cameras and it was muh smaller than the Fuji zoom and it was full frame!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2013 at 19:27 UTC
On Fujifilm announces XF 10-24mm F4 R OIS wideangle zoom article (172 comments in total)

This looks to be another quality lens from Fuji but what all the makers seem to be be missing whether for mirror-less or just aps-c on d-slr's is a compact fixed focal length uwa prime.

On m43 that would be say a 8.5mm to give a f.o.v of a 17mm on FF and on aps-c say 11mm.

I use a Sony 11-18 on my A77 and the only reason I do is for the 11mm end really. My 16-80 takes me wide enough most of the time and if I need wider than 16mm it is usually 11mm.

The Sony is not a heavy lens at all and is rather underrated (very good geometry IMO) but still, I'd prefer a less bulky lens to lug about so a 11mm F3.5 would be great.

I just find it odd that for all sensors smaller than FF no matter what make you shoot the only way to get an ultra wide angle rectilinear lens is to buy a zoom.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2013 at 11:41 UTC as 17th comment | 4 replies
On DPReview Gear of the Year Part 3: Olympus OM-D E-M1 article (396 comments in total)

"...but if I was selling every camera I own and starting afresh, the E-M1 would probably be the one I'd buy."

I agree. I shoot a Sony A77, have some very nice CZ and G lenses and I think its the best camera I have ever shot with. Ergonomically brilliant in my opinion.

However if all that gear went AWOL I would be taking a serious look at the E-M1. Looks a great camera to me with some fine lenses.

I enjoyed the article as well because instead of a review that people nit pick over or question the methodology of, this one is based on actually using the camera.

I think we are at the stage where image quality is more than good enough in many cameras and you can buy based on features and usability instead of basing it on how noisy it is at ISO 128000 or whatever.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 29, 2013 at 13:50 UTC as 85th comment
On DPReview on CreativeLIVE article (144 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cycleshooter: Video never has the information density of the printed word, but is cheaper
to produce. This is the first step back from what has made this site great.

Cheaper it isn't but the written word (with associated photos or illustrations) is far more easily referable than a video.

Nothing wrong with videos as such but prose is miles better for expressing any kind of definitive and/or authoritative opinion.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 28, 2013 at 02:46 UTC
In reply to:

spiderhunter: It appears that Canon and Nikon are so complacent with their toaster-sized DSLRs that they are blind to what is going around them. They can reduce the size of things but they just don't do it. The song "the times they are a-changing" comes to mind. Sure, they still have their lion's share of the pro market but I feel Sony has rocked the boat. The Sony FF mirrorless are still not there yet when it comes to AF tracking abilities ( but great for non-action work) and battery life
but given time and more RD, they will get there. I hope the size of truly capable pro models will get lighter, not heavier.

Hand phones got lighter and smaller. The early models were gigantic by comparison. Compactness and portability is what manufacturers should aim for. Yes, there is a limit as to how small FF lenses can go but striving to reduce sizes and making things lighter are surely the way to go.

Go Sony, go! Show them the way!

Hugi808. I don't recognise that description of the EVF on my Sony A77. It's great. Not sure why it would give anyone a headache either. It doesn't use some poor low frequency pulse width modulation technology like you find on cheap LCD monitors.

So for me the EVF isn't the problem with the A7's. It is what they have had to sacrifice in the pursuit of very small FF bodies. The lens mount is narrow so that makes fast lenses hard to make. There is no in-body stabilisation. The battery is small which means not only fewer shots but GPS which I find very useful has gone.

Canikon as spiderhunter said may be complacent in producing toaster sized dslrs but Sony has had to leave out too much modern innovation such as IBIS and GPS to achieve what they did. I am sure some people won't miss these things but I find them very useful so in that sense these cameras are a retrograde step. And of course they use a different lens mount than my A77 so its a completely system anyway.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 22, 2013 at 09:22 UTC
On In Photos: Portraits of the living legends of blues article (35 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: Portraits of the living legends of blues

Since 2008, photographer Lou Bopp has made regular trips down Mississippi's Route 61 — known as 'The Blues Highway' — to document the lives of unknown musicians who have made important contributions to the classic American musical genre.

These fellows are either living legends or unknown musicians. I don't think you can have it both ways. Since I own CDs of most of the Legends of Blues, living or otherwise, I was surprised to see these names mentioned under a title containing the term "Living Legends". DPR, you need to work a little harder on your editorial skills.

"hese guys were/are important in their contributions to a unique American genre."

Why? What did these particular guys contribute to the genre to make them specifically such important contributors to it?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 17, 2013 at 03:07 UTC
On Sony Alpha A7 / A7R preview (2381 comments in total)
In reply to:

AlexK-12: I can see two great reasons why Sony gave the a7/r the e-mount:
1). The ability to mount all legacy film lenses that already cover the 35mm format
2). The ability to use Canon/Nikon full frame lenses and possibly even with autofocus

It seems to me that Sony made the right decision to go with e-mount, even if it means that they have to start from scratch with FE lenses. If I had the need and money, I would sell my a77 and jump on the a7r. One day, perhaps :)

If Sony went e-mount so they could mount legacy lenses and to mount modern Canikon lenses it was a monumentally stupid basis for a decision. It compromises their existing A-mount use base who also have to use an adapter and loses iBIS which is a killer.

Yes some people are interested in making life difficult and using old lenses in a totally manual way but how many? Once many have tried the the novelty will soon ware off in my opinion. Did with me with a Helios 58mm F2 on my old A100. Just could not see the point.

Even if they can make Canikon lenses AF (is this really the case?) they will still be manual aperture and making it easy to use other makes lenses means you sell less of your own.

The size thing is a red herring. Cameras like the A37 and A55 were very small SLT cameras. The only dimension that needs to be bigger on A-mount (APC-C or FF) is the depth of the camera.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 15, 2013 at 09:37 UTC
On Tamron to develop 150-600mm F5-6.3 ultra-telephoto zoom article (193 comments in total)
In reply to:

Fedupandenglish: Interesting to read that Park Cameras have a pre-order facility that shows a price of £2,500. Rather more than I had hoped for, but I wonder how accurate this is?

Sorry I ment the 90mm VC. Got confused with the Sigma 105 I bought instead.

The 90 started out at £999 and is now £499 or less depending on mount.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 8, 2013 at 16:40 UTC
On Tamron to develop 150-600mm F5-6.3 ultra-telephoto zoom article (193 comments in total)
In reply to:

Fedupandenglish: Interesting to read that Park Cameras have a pre-order facility that shows a price of £2,500. Rather more than I had hoped for, but I wonder how accurate this is?

They tried to sell their latest 105 macro at £999 in the UK. It now goes for £499 or less.

Not saying that guarantees that Park Cameras price will see similar % drop but I can't see them shifting that many at £2.5K.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 8, 2013 at 09:59 UTC
On Tamron to develop 150-600mm F5-6.3 ultra-telephoto zoom article (193 comments in total)
In reply to:

dlkeller: If Tamron leaves the VC off this lens as they have their 18-270 PZD for Sony mounts I am through with their company forever! Otherwise, it is definitely on my wish list.

Bjorn_L :"Until they make the in camera automatically shut itself off when it detects (or is told) about in lens, the lens makers have little choice but to ship their Sony lenses without stabilization."

Not true. I have the Sigma F2.8 105 DG HSM OS macro lens in Sony mount and the the OS is NOT disabled. It works.

Having tried it I prefer in-body IS. Maybe I wouldn't with a 600mm lens.

As to people complaining about Tamron taking it out and charging the same well my guess is they don't take it out but just disable it. Taking the lens elements out that controls the stabilization would mean they were making a different lens optically for Sony so that would increase production costs. So it will cost the same to build the Sony version as it does the others.

It does seem stupid to disable it but for me if the price is right I will by the lens because it is what it is. The fact the other versions have OS is of no interest to me as they won't fit on my camera.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 8, 2013 at 09:54 UTC
On Tamron to develop 150-600mm F5-6.3 ultra-telephoto zoom article (193 comments in total)

Well this could be on list. I have Sony 70-300G and 500mm mirror lens and while the latter is AF it is often too slow to focus for wildlife and is only good for static shots and the G lacks the reach.

It will depend on price, focusing speed and IQ at 600mm wide open (you don't buy lenses like this for IQ at 150mm @ F8). I see a lot of long range zooms seem to tail off IQ-wise at the long end and if this lens bucks the trend I can see it selling well.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 7, 2013 at 15:15 UTC as 49th comment
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 Review preview (559 comments in total)
In reply to:

MGJA: This is silver, but Canon 70D is gold. Heh.

Really, I am ever more convinced that dpr just hands those out in order to maximize page reloads as irate fangurls battle it out in the comments. Fine, whatever puts food on their tables is a-ok with me.

It's got IBIS and it's got an EVF which makes the camera far more useful than similar cameras that lack one or the other or both yet these have aspects of them listed in the cons?

IBIS is great and the fact you don't see a stabilised image from it is just how it works and how it has worked to the best of my knowledge on all IBIS based cameras including the Oly Pen cameras and it isn't listed as a con in the el p5 review so why here?

The EVF adds bulk? Well I have seen one of these cameras in the shops and its a very small camera regardless and it gives you the option of shooting in (to my mind) a far more natural way. External EVF's cost a lot and add even more bulk.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 7, 2013 at 09:31 UTC
On Retro Nikon 'DF' emerges from the shadows article (1514 comments in total)
In reply to:

larrytusaz: The deliberate omission of the senseless YouTube mode alone makes me want to buy it, based solely on that principle alone. Putting YouTube on an SLR totally splatters any purity it would otherwise have.

"i only wonder why you would PREFER to NOT have a feature you can just ignore."

I can via a menu setting disable the video button on my A77 and I do. To take a video I would instead have to move a dial to do so. There is good reason to disable the button and that is because you can easily press it by mistake!

That is the only impact the fact my camera is a capable video camera has on my hobby of stills photography.

However what bothers me about other "hybrid" cameras is just how much effort is put into making video work and how much menu space, dial space andbutton space gets eaten up by the video function.

By the way I am 54, I lecture in Computer Science, build my own PC's, think OVF's are outdated and am a total gadget geek but my thing is ergonomics and usability. I don't want to have to consciously ignore stuff I will never use.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 2, 2013 at 02:56 UTC
On Retro Nikon 'DF' emerges from the shadows article (1514 comments in total)
In reply to:

image360by180: I truly find it hard to believe Nikon is going back. The digital age is now the age. Bringing out a camera that ignores all the benefits that digital can offer is like making a better old school buggy whip as cars started to replace carriages.

As noted, many seem to like this, good for you, I'm not about judgement or placing my basis on others. Hope this works for you.

For me, this is crazy stupid as Nikon has not even come close to maximizing the digital potential of their DSLR line.

Just a comment from a Nikon D800/D7100 glass invested user.

It's all about ergonomics and just because it apes a Nikon FM it doesn't mean the ergonomics are going to be bad.

What Nikon need to complete the package is aperture rings on the lenses.

I love the ergonomics of my Sony A77 which is of course very modern in that respect but I can appreciate the design of a camera like this Nikon.

The problem lies when cameras are neither one thing nor the other. If the shutter speed dial is just for retro looks and the rest of the design doesn't compliment it ergonomically then people can slag it off but those teasers suggest otherwise to me.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 2, 2013 at 02:37 UTC
On Retro Nikon 'DF' emerges from the shadows article (1514 comments in total)
In reply to:

dark goob: Mirrorosaur

I am not sure why anyone would lay their camera on the table for day but on my recent holiday to the Isle of Sky I forgot to turn my Sony A77 off at the end of the day at least twice and it was ready to go the day after no problem.

When you don't use it, it sleeps.

In fact I never turn it off when out with it so the GPS doesn't have to re-lock onto the satellites and battery life is not an issue. One battery will last all day.

Can I also have some of whatever it is you are on if you (not the camera) are ready to take a photo after 0.2s :)

Direct link | Posted on Nov 2, 2013 at 02:28 UTC
Total: 180, showing: 41 – 60
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »