instamatic

instamatic

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Nov 8, 2004

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Total: 40, showing: 1 – 20
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On Nikon 1 J4 sports new sensor, improved AF system, and Wi-Fi news story (206 comments in total)
In reply to:

Danlo: I sooo wish Nikon would read these comments, bur looking at their linup, you know they never do. Like where is the FF-sensor in a d3300 body? I wouldnt even care about other companies mirrorless-offerings it they just released that.

I would be interested in a full-frame sensor in a Nikon N65 style body. Just the basics, no gimmicks. It would not have to even have a pentaprism, a pentamirror would do. They could resurrect the CAM900 AF module for it, or perhaps the CAM1300 from the F100. Give it a nice flash sync of 1/250 sec, plus FP and it's a great camera. I don't care for video personally for this kind of body, but to be "competitive" I guess the camera would have to have it.

Also it may be difficult to fit a 3 inch screen on such a small body, but I wouldn't care. The screen could be smaller for my needs, however I could appreciate live histogram in live view, plus exposure compensation preview in live view.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 11, 2014 at 14:35 UTC
On Mockups emerge of new Olympus OM-D 'OM-G' news story (331 comments in total)

Insertable cartridges? Could it be that this camera will have replaceable sensor modules? Perhaps user-replaceable? That would be super nice and quite innovative.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 1, 2014 at 18:46 UTC as 145th comment | 3 replies
On Apple applies for dual-sensor camera patent post (71 comments in total)

Solutions like these are the future, but it seems that Apple is a bit late to the game with this one.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 26, 2014 at 15:28 UTC as 17th comment
On Samsung announces tiny NX mini mirrorless camera news story (77 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: How is this better than a Panasonic LX7? You get a brighter lens with a bigger zoom range for a lot less money. Sure it has a bigger sensor than the Panasonic. However, the Panasonic's lens is much brighter(More than 2 stops).

No exactly. Currently owning the LX7, and using it most often at aperture f/2.0 or brighter, you can still cause the background to blur, naturally not to the same level as when using a DSLR.

The only thing the LX7 is practically missing is an IR remote control. Otherwise it's a fantastic camera that can fit in a jacket pocket.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 19, 2014 at 15:32 UTC
On Am I missing something here? article (564 comments in total)

Looking at the price, it is probably another Nikon 1 product that won't sell well. I think Nikon continues to be confused about what people expect and for how much, and where the photography market really is these days.

I'm also surprised that they thought to aim Nikon 1 at "soccer moms". Like someone said below, most of them are just fine with their smartphones, and those who want to turn their photography into a business, already buy Canon Rebels or go directly for the 5D series. And why Canon? Because other "soccer moms" or startup family photographers already use Canon cameras for the most part.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 13, 2014 at 15:35 UTC as 128th comment
In reply to:

D 503: You could tell when Olympus was in trouble by the introduction of plastic lens mounts and the culling of professional software. When a company like Nikon starts to cut costs and raise prices it gets you thinking.

Interesting that you bring up cost cutting and price raising. Price raising on already highly priced products would be synonymous with a company that tries to bolster it's image as a premium brand, regardless if the underlying engineering and manufacturing costs are cut. However for a brand to be perceived as a premium brand, it has to offer stellar, and I stress stellar - not "good enough" customer service. People come back for more to a company that they perceive is reliable and responsive to their needs and questions.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 28, 2014 at 17:06 UTC

I spent a good part of last evening playing with NX-D and while it isn't really a huge disappointment, I would expect better.

The good thing is that Nikon colors are now easier to obtain. NX-D is significantly faster than NX2, except that it is still quite slow at rendering previews - and this rendering seems to happen after you make any adjustment to the image. Why is this so slow? I imagine this could easily be improved. How about optimizing that code, and letting the hardware GPU handle the rendering to screen?

I still likely save time using NX-D, than using an elaborate process to achieve a look I like with other software and plugins. NX-D would be a major change in my workflow, but I would get nice or nicer results IMO. While this may be true, it's not what the market expects.

Also, you need to do a lot of clicking to get things done, less it seems than in NX2, but still more than needed. Lightroom and Aperture get this right - all sliders and tools in one place.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2014 at 17:06 UTC as 26th comment | 1 reply
On Nikon D4s First Impressions Review preview (819 comments in total)
In reply to:

Provia_fan: Nikon should be applauded, for keeping the resolution to a sensible pixel count for what this camera is going to be mostly used for. Although I think that High ISO settings are getting ridiculously high for some time now. Until the tradeoffs are sorted of course. But I am sure it will have its uses.

This is indeed true. The current breed of 24-36 MP DSLRs really means you also need to be upgrading your computer with your camera purchase to handle their large files unless you have a very recent one. How many megapixels do you practically need day-to-day?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 16:28 UTC
On Nikon D4s First Impressions Review preview (819 comments in total)
In reply to:

Vegasus: Oh Nikon,... why dont you put BUILT IN WIFI instead? THUNDERBOLT 2 connector, and 2 sd card slots not XQD. why no XQD? is sony stuff, usually doesnt last long, next time sony will make XQD type-2 with different shape again.

Probably because that would mean making the camera buffer even deeper to allow for continuous framerate at high speed, as SD cards tend to be slower than CF and XQD cards as of today. Added buffer memory adds costs to making the camera.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 16:22 UTC
On Eye-Fi Mobi Wi-Fi SD card review article (96 comments in total)
In reply to:

write2alan: Question: Do I need a router to transfer the images to a desktop or phone?

No you don't. You may need internet connection for initial configuration though.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 21, 2014 at 19:40 UTC
On Eye-Fi Mobi Wi-Fi SD card review article (96 comments in total)

I use an older version of Eye-Fi. It it very handy and possibly the fastest way to get JPEG pictures off your camera to your mobile device, (and even to your computer), or cloud through your mobile device. Indeed money well spent. It gives more traditional cameras that don't have wi-fi built-in a fighting chance vs. smartphones, seriously. We live in a world that likes to brag about what it's doing on social networks, and with the advent of the smartphone a few years ago, being able to instantly upload photos taken is very much a necessity today for very many people.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 21, 2014 at 16:32 UTC as 24th comment
In reply to:

JohnEwing: Nikon's first step into the mirrorless world gained them firstly a twisted ankle and secondly a Bronx cheer, before a few people began to see that the Series 1 aren't such bad cameras after all, but that was like people taking to Heaven's Gate after United Artists had turned up their umbilici.

Personally, I'd like to see them bring out a mirrorless body based on the S or SP designs, with a full frame or even an APS-C sensor. FF might be better from a marketing standpoint, but an APS-C camera could be very acceptable indeed. They could probably finagle it to have an F mount, too. Large wow factor there: they immediately upstage virtually all the others, especially if they use the folding Ai tab of the Df and make it compatible with a godzillion lenses.

...well, it's nice to dream.

Marty, indeed Nikon 1 should be positioned as you describe. I think to achieve that positioning it is mostly an issue of price. Naturally built-in WI-FI is expected these days.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 19, 2014 at 03:05 UTC
In reply to:

JohnEwing: Nikon's first step into the mirrorless world gained them firstly a twisted ankle and secondly a Bronx cheer, before a few people began to see that the Series 1 aren't such bad cameras after all, but that was like people taking to Heaven's Gate after United Artists had turned up their umbilici.

Personally, I'd like to see them bring out a mirrorless body based on the S or SP designs, with a full frame or even an APS-C sensor. FF might be better from a marketing standpoint, but an APS-C camera could be very acceptable indeed. They could probably finagle it to have an F mount, too. Large wow factor there: they immediately upstage virtually all the others, especially if they use the folding Ai tab of the Df and make it compatible with a godzillion lenses.

...well, it's nice to dream.

@Jim F. I agree with you, most especially your last statement. Price indeed usually rules, especially if it gives the buyer 'good enough' quality. Also, how can Nikon 1 compete with smartphones? Most people nowadays own a smartphone and take it everywhere, while a camera is just another thing to carry around. Not to mention, a smartphone allows instant posting of photos to social media, and we seem to live in a 'bragging' culture that likes to post everything on social networks. I also see a big movement away from prints to showing images on some kind of screen instead. I myself carry some of my favorite photos on my iPhone and iPad and have them on me all the time, or actually in the cloud that my devices are connected to. And with the screen being the new media for presentation, you don't even need 10-14 megapixel images. 3-4 megapixels are just perfect, and image quality issues like noise become moot because they are not as much a problem on small screens as they once were.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 19, 2014 at 02:21 UTC
In reply to:

naturenewbe: I go hang out with photographers who use there canon cameras all the time all I see them use is the kit lens, auto settings and liveview. I'm the only one using the viewfinder and shooting in manual mode. How much better suited my friends would be to just a mirorless camera like a A5000. Also the newly wed couple at best buy who want to take better pictures of there new baby but dont want to hassel with learning with DSLR buying there second DSLR because there pictures dont look right.... I dont see them liking there next new DSLR Even more. I have a D40 that has been faithfull for many years but stop my self from buying a new nikon body and lens because I cant take the weight on my back anymore. Personally I'm leaning toward Panasonic because of video quality and size.

I believe that Canon's automatic metering may be a little better than Nikon's, just as is Canon's default JPEG color. What I find painful with Nikon is that for the last few years the matrix meter is tied to the active focus point. The old matrix meter used on the D70 and in the D200 was terrific when also you added 1 or 2 external Nikon flashes to the mix. The new meter tied to focus points makes it a bit unpredictable and I just can't trust it for consistency. Regarding Panasonic. My wife and I use the Panasonic LX7 and it's a terrific camera. We bought it because Nikon didn't have a comparable offering (and still does not). The LX7 has terrific colors out of the box, good exposure (perhaps even a bit hot), and great video with no jello effect. It has a small sensor, but it's lens is f/1.4 through f/2.3 and that helps a lot. I can highly recommend that camera. The only missing point that I wish it had is a wireless remote. Otherwise it meets and exceeds our requirements.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2014 at 17:35 UTC
In reply to:

instamatic: To answer Nikon why their mirrorless is not selling in the US: Nikon 1 has a small sensor, while the US consumer expects at least a DX sensor. Why? Probably because many hobbyists are vainly hoping to one day have some success at shooting weddings, or whatever - which for most people never materializes, but still the illusion is there. Regardless of where the hobbyist is on their photography journey, it is universally known that wedding/portrait photography requires a large sensor for shallow and popular depth of field with fast lenses. And where are the fast lenses for mirrorless? Thirdly why in the world the lesser Nikon 1 cameras have flash sync only at 1/60 sec? Why aren't DSLR speedlights compatible?

Nikon's compact cameras are also not up to par. Where is a compact with a 'standard' zoom lens and aperture somewhere between f/1.4 and f/2.5 or similar. Why aren't all Nikon's compact cameras allowing saving RAW files. Where is built in WI-FI?

Where is the D400?

If you recall, Nikon D70 had an electronic shutter that synced up to 1/500 sec. - something I very much miss today. It's mechanical shutter was much slower than that.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2014 at 19:41 UTC

To answer Nikon why their mirrorless is not selling in the US: Nikon 1 has a small sensor, while the US consumer expects at least a DX sensor. Why? Probably because many hobbyists are vainly hoping to one day have some success at shooting weddings, or whatever - which for most people never materializes, but still the illusion is there. Regardless of where the hobbyist is on their photography journey, it is universally known that wedding/portrait photography requires a large sensor for shallow and popular depth of field with fast lenses. And where are the fast lenses for mirrorless? Thirdly why in the world the lesser Nikon 1 cameras have flash sync only at 1/60 sec? Why aren't DSLR speedlights compatible?

Nikon's compact cameras are also not up to par. Where is a compact with a 'standard' zoom lens and aperture somewhere between f/1.4 and f/2.5 or similar. Why aren't all Nikon's compact cameras allowing saving RAW files. Where is built in WI-FI?

Where is the D400?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2014 at 17:17 UTC as 134th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Brian OReilly: Pardon?
"Only Supports D7000 and later DSLR"

This is a really underhand way of saying that
According to the timeline on this page:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Nikon_DSLR_cameras

That means it does not support:
D3
D300
D200
All D2 variants

This is really poor
So - to process Nikon NEF files with Nikon Capture NX2 I will need to keep 2 different versions of the SW on a machine
Same applies with Nikon Camera Control Pro2

But, I do not believe you can have 2 different versions of the SW on the same machine - so you need to have 2 different startup disks.

So much for using Nikon products and the longevity of the NEF format moving into the future
Do we need to keep legacy hardware and operating systems and Nikon SW so we can access our images?

Sorry for the rant - but this is really disappointing
Brian

I think it's only the enhanced white balance feature that requires a D7000 or later to be operational. Otherwise the software should work with the older cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2014 at 22:39 UTC
In reply to:

Peiasdf: Another half-baked product with attractive spec just like most stuff from S. Korea. Samsung should focus on firmware update to get existing products working as advertised.

Have you used any of those Samsung cameras? I went out to actually try Samsung cameras at a store, and I found that they are surprisingly responsive photographically, and easily set up. I would consider them a very strong offering considering where the industry is headed.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 2, 2014 at 20:56 UTC
On Nikon Df preview (2817 comments in total)

Also, why not just take the D800, stick this 16MP sensor in it, increase FPS to 8, add WI-FI, name it D800h, and call it a day?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2013 at 05:19 UTC as 952nd comment | 1 reply
On Nikon Df preview (2817 comments in total)

I have a feeling that Nikon targeted this camera more at the collectors than photographers just needing a full-featured, full-frame camera. The high price is one indicator of that, and I have no qualms about stating that in this day and age - this price is indeed steep for a full-frame camera - that also does not come with built-in WI-FI. The focusing screen remains a big question here as well, and I think a lack of split-screen prism would confirm that the serious manual focus photographers continue to be left out. I for one sold my 50mm f/1.2 AI-S only because accurately focusing with it was next to impossible on the D700 because it's focusing screen is only viable for something like f/2.8 lenses and darker. Otherwise one has to rely on the green dot rangefinder indicator which I found not to work as well as I would want it. I'm hoping that the Df addresses that. Bottom line, I'm disappointed - but of course I haven't used this camera yet.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2013 at 05:15 UTC as 959th comment | 1 reply
Total: 40, showing: 1 – 20
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