Antsl

Lives in Australia Melbourne, Australia
Works as a Photographer
Has a website at www.anthonymckee.com
Joined on Sep 14, 2005

Comments

Total: 5, showing: 1 – 5
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Antsl: Please, oh please... if you are going to test lenses with built in vibration reduction, can you at least give the lens a chance to show what it can do at the lower shutter speeds. Usually VR and VC lenses are described by how many stop they will let you drop below the recommended shutter speed for a lens, which is usually the reciprocal of the focal length. In this instance that recommended handheld speed would be about 1/90th of a second... and if the VR on this lens is any good I would expect photos to be made at shutter speeds three stops slower than that (as in 1/10th of a second). You only have two photos in this collection that were made a a speed slower than 1/90th of a second (one was at 1/80th and the other at 1/60th). It is not what I would call a real world test of a VC lens... it sounds more like another DPR sunny day test. Please... start thinking more like the photographers who might actually use, and in many instances push this gear to the edge!!

@hzb ... really? Portrait photographers have been making people hold still in photographs for over 150 years! The difference is that in the 18th century, subjects had to hold still for several seconds... but in more recent times it is still not uncommon for a photographer to use shutter speeds as low a 1/15th of a second to make a portrait. "Why" I hear you ask? Because when you are working outdoors in the dusk or dawn, or if you are combining flash with ambient, low shutter speeds become important. Sadly... too many photographers get stuck on the petty comments that you make about shutter speed, and what happens soon afterwards is that you are encouraging other photographers (including the camera wielders at DPR) to become boring photographers governed by rules.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2016 at 21:48 UTC

Please, oh please... if you are going to test lenses with built in vibration reduction, can you at least give the lens a chance to show what it can do at the lower shutter speeds. Usually VR and VC lenses are described by how many stop they will let you drop below the recommended shutter speed for a lens, which is usually the reciprocal of the focal length. In this instance that recommended handheld speed would be about 1/90th of a second... and if the VR on this lens is any good I would expect photos to be made at shutter speeds three stops slower than that (as in 1/10th of a second). You only have two photos in this collection that were made a a speed slower than 1/90th of a second (one was at 1/80th and the other at 1/60th). It is not what I would call a real world test of a VC lens... it sounds more like another DPR sunny day test. Please... start thinking more like the photographers who might actually use, and in many instances push this gear to the edge!!

Link | Posted on May 19, 2016 at 12:29 UTC as 30th comment | 5 replies
On article Ten items you should have in your camera bag (288 comments in total)

What about rewriting this story with consideration to different genres of photography... not the generic "one bag fits all" mindset that this author has used. Seriously... how many people would get much use out of a tripod that is 6-inches tall... or a flash unit that can only be used on camera in TTL mode. And adding a smart phone or tablet to the bag!? Seriously! Start over please!

Link | Posted on Oct 4, 2013 at 22:07 UTC as 122nd comment | 1 reply

A good photographer having a bad day.

Most photographers at some stage in their career have turned up to a job only to discover what is happening is not what they prepared for. It might be a poor brief, language barriers or just the weather throwing its hand. The real test of test of the photographer in these situations is to adapt and move on.

If I was an US team member I would be disappointed in these photos. Given that Klamar was shooting for a French agency, my guess is that could also be part of a personal send-up or private joke. Knowing that many parts of the US are struggling economically, maybe he thinks these athletes should be captured in a more honest situation.

Personally, I think you can share that message while still employing the fundamentals of good photography, namely good lighting, design and emotion.

At least there were other photographers at this event who were also making photos of the same athletes.... it would be good to see their photos sometime soon.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2012 at 23:27 UTC as 185th comment

Toy... that is all this is... a toy... and you know what happens with toys... everyone thinks they are cute and fun for a few months until a better toy comes along and then it gets left to gather dust in a cupboard.

What is sad is that Nikon had the opportunity to be the first company to create a compact, pro-sumer level mirror-less camera... something that would rival the Leica M9 and give professionals, not an alternative, but an additional format to work with on assignments... and they have absolutely blown it.

Very disappointed Nikon...

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2011 at 04:55 UTC as 146th comment
Total: 5, showing: 1 – 5