dash2k8

dash2k8

Joined on May 13, 2010

Comments

Total: 27, showing: 21 – 27
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In reply to:

RichardAB: I think it wil be very interesting to hear from the photographer after the event, I hope he'll talk about the experience.

He's taken lots of great shots, imho, of the 2012 games.

I'd like the negative whingers below to provide a link to show their own best sports shot, then we can see if they have a clue about what they're talking about - I doubt they have anything worth seeing.

I'm also left wondering if the whingers are jealous, would they feel differently if the shots featured American competitors and the Games were in the USA?

By bringing in nationality into your argument, you lost all steam.

Meaningless accusations aside, you challenged the WHINERS to post their best sports shots as a way to validate their own comments. That's the equivalent of movie critics who can't produce their own movies being unqualified to judge. You think Ebert ever filmed his own movie? Yet he's a respected critic. There are mostly wedding photog's on this board, so you're not going to see any sports photos posted, but that doesn't mean we don't know a lousy photo when we see it. The Panasonic photos are soft (heavy noise reduction) and colors look a bit too saturated to my eyes. Just because I don't have an Olympic press pass doesn't mean I can't be disappointed.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 9, 2012 at 00:34 UTC

Each day I check the Lumix Olympics site, waiting to be wowed. So far it's been hugely disappointing. The pictures look overly noise-reduced. As others have said, what a great way to kill the product's PR. Oh, and the photog who agreed to do this did not help his reputation at all. What a waste of time. I hope he sold his photo soul for a really high price, cos he's gonna need all of it to buy redemption.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 6, 2012 at 13:41 UTC as 7th comment
In reply to:

DrGerm: Haven't read this book, but own McNally's other two. Both very good reads, so I have high hopes for this one, too. If you don't expect a manual, his writing tends to be very entertaining, and you still learn a lot without even knowing it.

@audijam - I'm not saying it's a bad book, nor do I worship him as you imply. I'm just saying it's not like the first two books. And no, sorry, you're not going to be like him or beat him. So you might as well worship him.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2012 at 00:04 UTC
In reply to:

villebon: In a way it's kind of funny reading comments from the know-it-all idiots who can't fathoms the idea of the Panasonic G5 being used at the Olympics.

These appliance users have no idea on how sport photography works except what they imagine: long lens and high ISO. They are ignorant that the indoors meets are lighted for television at ISO 200.

It's all about the photographer. The average appliance user wouldn't last a day at the Olympics with the top of the line camera equipment: all they would take would be amateur snaps worthy of the delete bucket.

At the same time, despite the perfect lighting, the pros still prefer the 1DX's and D4's. I agree that the average user couldn't take anything great even with great equipment, but that does not negate the need for the best gear.

Think of it this way: would you bring your best Canon/Nikon gear to the Olympics, or would you say,"Great lighting! Let me bring my PnS!"?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 29, 2012 at 22:24 UTC

Did anyone notice that just about all of Dean's pictures were taken at 8mm? Does that show a lack of confidence in the zooms?

Thus far I've not been made a believer of the G5. The shots were not inspiring at all. Anyone among us with some skill (and an all-access press badge) could have taken those shots. I'll reserve judgment till the end of the Games.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 29, 2012 at 22:22 UTC as 39th comment
In reply to:

StanRogers: It's the lack of "recipe" that I find makes McNally's work worth reading. Outside of the controlled environment of a studio large enough to have negligible room-boundary reflections, one is very unlikely to come across a situation where a rote recipe is going to work. (Although, when you can get a recipe down and done, as in Peter Hurley's headshot setup, you can concentrate entirely on the non-technical aspects of the picture--but as Hurley puts it, his job is only about 10% photographer and 90% therapist.) When you give me the "why" instead of the "what", there's a chance I'll actually learn something. Heck, I probably learned more about fashion and beauty photography from McNally's 24-page Elinchrom product brochure than from most of the books and videos I've seen on the subject because his little blurbs are all about the "why", even if the accompanying product shots and info are concentrating on the "what". I'll be buying this one.

This book actually has tons of those recipes you mentioned. Not saying this is a bad book, but it's definitely not a sequel to the others.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 29, 2012 at 22:19 UTC
In reply to:

DrGerm: Haven't read this book, but own McNally's other two. Both very good reads, so I have high hopes for this one, too. If you don't expect a manual, his writing tends to be very entertaining, and you still learn a lot without even knowing it.

I have this book, and I think you'll be disappointed. It IS a field manual, sprinkled with occasional stories in between. Much, much more technical than his other two books, which I also have. Just a word of warning.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 29, 2012 at 22:18 UTC
Total: 27, showing: 21 – 27
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