Isca

Isca

Lives in Canada Unionville, Canada
Works as a Sales
Joined on Jan 7, 2003

Comments

Total: 11, showing: 1 – 11
In reply to:

Isca: Without the Russians war in Europe could have dragged on. The fighting, the harsh winter, all stretched Hitler and the German army to its absolute limits before it succumbed. As we all know from Hollywood the US won the war on the western front singlehandedly.

Beautiful image - interesting that photojournalism has all of these constraints on representation today and yet many of the iconic images of the second war seem to have been staged.

"did nothing for a year"? "fled to their island" British casualties in WW2 were triple those of the US per capita. The British had the nerve to stand up to Hitler while the Americans waited for Pearl Harbour and a direct attack, such was foreign policy. Interesting that you have decided that you are the arbiter of "real history" and the "patriotic trash" of elementary schools is unacceptable. I absolutely agree that the Americans were an essential part of the war effort as were the Russians, and sadly the Russian effort went largely unnoticed in the history books for many years. And continues to go unnoticed in Hollywood :)

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 20:52 UTC

Without the Russians war in Europe could have dragged on. The fighting, the harsh winter, all stretched Hitler and the German army to its absolute limits before it succumbed. As we all know from Hollywood the US won the war on the western front singlehandedly.

Beautiful image - interesting that photojournalism has all of these constraints on representation today and yet many of the iconic images of the second war seem to have been staged.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 16, 2014 at 17:12 UTC as 48th comment | 8 replies
On A look at the Lomography Petzval 85mm F2.2 lens article (156 comments in total)

To call that bokeh jarring is a massive understatement. Just a shame that the lens sitting on the end of the camera is not understated, I guess you could call that look jarring too.

I can't even think of a bad reason to buy it.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 2, 2014 at 20:22 UTC as 57th comment
On 2014 iPhone Photography Awards winners announced article (102 comments in total)
In reply to:

Isca: Taking photos with a cell phone and with a dslr are different processes. The tool makes you see it differently, partly due to the limitations of the tool but also partly due to the nature of the tool. I have taken many photos on my dslr, rangefinder, micro four thirds and cell phone and entered all to camera club competitions. All have been well received.

It's not about lugging the camera, it's about horses for courses, in the simplest comparison I won't shoot landscapes with a rangefinder or street photography with a dslr. But what you see around the image border as well as the scene (and about a gazillion other things) are the constraints for me. Those constraints produce challenges but also produce opportunities. Go try it, it's actually quite fun to try a different tool.

Look up graduated neutral density filters - they will solve that problem to an extent and give your images more depth as you won't be fighting blocked out shadows and burnt out sunsets. But you're absolutely right, practice does make perfect.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2014 at 20:05 UTC
On 2014 iPhone Photography Awards winners announced article (102 comments in total)
In reply to:

Isca: Taking photos with a cell phone and with a dslr are different processes. The tool makes you see it differently, partly due to the limitations of the tool but also partly due to the nature of the tool. I have taken many photos on my dslr, rangefinder, micro four thirds and cell phone and entered all to camera club competitions. All have been well received.

It's not about lugging the camera, it's about horses for courses, in the simplest comparison I won't shoot landscapes with a rangefinder or street photography with a dslr. But what you see around the image border as well as the scene (and about a gazillion other things) are the constraints for me. Those constraints produce challenges but also produce opportunities. Go try it, it's actually quite fun to try a different tool.

Good points but the trouble is you only get one shot. Rangefinders are all manual focus and there is no fully automatic mode so there's alot of pre-setting or focussing on the fly or focussing using hyperfocal focus. They're also nice and light and honestly, the process of taking the shot is different. It's infinitely more engaging for street or candid photography in my experience. That's not to say that I don't enjoy the dslr, I thoroughly enjoy that for landscapes, setting up a tripod, setting the focus, dropping in the grads, that too is engaging for landscapes. As I said in my very first comment on the iPhone awards "horses for courses", I'm not married to any brand or type of camera, it's whatever works for you to make the images that YOU are happy with. I find it amazing that so many people are willing to discount an alternative view of looking at the world through the lens.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2014 at 16:48 UTC
On 2014 iPhone Photography Awards winners announced article (102 comments in total)
In reply to:

Isca: Taking photos with a cell phone and with a dslr are different processes. The tool makes you see it differently, partly due to the limitations of the tool but also partly due to the nature of the tool. I have taken many photos on my dslr, rangefinder, micro four thirds and cell phone and entered all to camera club competitions. All have been well received.

It's not about lugging the camera, it's about horses for courses, in the simplest comparison I won't shoot landscapes with a rangefinder or street photography with a dslr. But what you see around the image border as well as the scene (and about a gazillion other things) are the constraints for me. Those constraints produce challenges but also produce opportunities. Go try it, it's actually quite fun to try a different tool.

Combat - A few reasons, the biggest ones are that a dslr is a little too obtrusive. With street photography you tend to want so shoot a moment in time as it were and in order to not disturb that moment you need to be a little more stealthy. Additionally, and this sort of flies in the face of the above you sort of need to be a part of it so you need to be up close so the longer lenses that are the advantage of a dslr over a rangefinder for many types of shooting aren't in this case. The other thing that is quite important to me at least is that a rangefinder viewfinder is not WYSIWYG as it has crop lines in the viewfinder meaning that you can see outside the frame of what you're actually taking a picture of. This means that it's easier to see the context of what you're shooting, an important consideration in street photography. Thinking about it, the iPhone has some of those advantages, no viewfinder so you see context and it is very unobtrusive and non-threatening.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2014 at 15:34 UTC
On 2014 iPhone Photography Awards winners announced article (102 comments in total)
In reply to:

Isca: Taking photos with a cell phone and with a dslr are different processes. The tool makes you see it differently, partly due to the limitations of the tool but also partly due to the nature of the tool. I have taken many photos on my dslr, rangefinder, micro four thirds and cell phone and entered all to camera club competitions. All have been well received.

It's not about lugging the camera, it's about horses for courses, in the simplest comparison I won't shoot landscapes with a rangefinder or street photography with a dslr. But what you see around the image border as well as the scene (and about a gazillion other things) are the constraints for me. Those constraints produce challenges but also produce opportunities. Go try it, it's actually quite fun to try a different tool.

Eddy M - here you go, not sure what my portfolio proves or disproves though.

http://garethcallaway.smugmug.com/browse

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2014 at 15:28 UTC
On 2014 iPhone Photography Awards winners announced article (102 comments in total)

Taking photos with a cell phone and with a dslr are different processes. The tool makes you see it differently, partly due to the limitations of the tool but also partly due to the nature of the tool. I have taken many photos on my dslr, rangefinder, micro four thirds and cell phone and entered all to camera club competitions. All have been well received.

It's not about lugging the camera, it's about horses for courses, in the simplest comparison I won't shoot landscapes with a rangefinder or street photography with a dslr. But what you see around the image border as well as the scene (and about a gazillion other things) are the constraints for me. Those constraints produce challenges but also produce opportunities. Go try it, it's actually quite fun to try a different tool.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 16, 2014 at 18:14 UTC as 8th comment | 9 replies
On 2014 iPhone Photography Awards winners announced article (102 comments in total)

"real camera", "it's a phone" etc etc. I'd say the limitations are self imposed by the people who think that way. I own a dslr, rangefinder, micro four thirds and iPhone, all of which are cameras for a certain type of photography. Part of the art of the iPhone is the "limitation" of it and part of it is its compactness. I spent a year of an iPhone photo a day and loved it. The most I managed with a "real camera" is a month. Authenticity? You don't take a photo, you make it, do you use Photoshop, Lightroom, or whatever to post process?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 15, 2014 at 22:36 UTC as 17th comment | 1 reply
On EyeEm offers more social image-sharing options post (6 comments in total)

I tried Instagram but it's a bit limiting, the current favourite is Tadaa. The filters and editting features are far more comprehensive while not offering the full range of Photoforge or Snapseed say. That said, most shots tend to enter a few different apps anyway so no big deal there. Tadaa seems to offer a real community too and I think is the most popular sharing site in a few parts of the world. I tried EyeEm but wasn't impressed.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 29, 2012 at 19:47 UTC as 3rd comment
On Announcing connect.dpreview.com article (250 comments in total)

The snobbery of the "real" photographers using "real" cameras is astounding. The best camera is the one that you have with you, ever heard that phrase before? I've been shooting a photo a day for 6 weeks, many times when the other 3 "real" cameras are at home. The iPhone forces me to look at subjects differently so I welcome this refreshing direction that dept has taken (this post typed on my Canon 5D Mk 2).

Direct link | Posted on Oct 10, 2012 at 20:16 UTC as 39th comment | 10 replies
Total: 11, showing: 1 – 11