David247

David247

Lives in United States Denver, CO, United States
Works as a Photographer, writer, caregiver,
Joined on Feb 29, 2008
About me:

Freelance photographer, writer, blogger and family caregiver. Kind of like being retired but I work harder and don't get paid.

Comments

Total: 36, showing: 1 – 20
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On First impressions of the Pentax K50 and K500 article (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

fuxicek: Is there camouflage option?

Not a true camouflage but you could go with a combination of Olive green body and either brown or black grip to get a semi camo/military like look. Another alternative would be Sand beige body with brown grip for a semi desert camo look.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 24, 2013 at 23:45 UTC
On First impressions of the Pentax K50 and K500 article (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

Brettsko: Is the DL-109 battery and charger available as an optional extra for the K-500 or is it exclusively designed for AA's?

Yes it is an option

Direct link | Posted on Jun 24, 2013 at 23:42 UTC

Interesting. While some of the color combinations are downright obnoxious (but someone will probably pick them just to stand out,) there are some very nice combination. The color combo tool is at http://www.pentaximaging.com/K50studio#/cocoa_brown/brown

For formal affairs, the gold with black grip is quite nice but I really lean towards either Black or Brown grip with either Sand Beige, Cocoa Brown or Olive Green for a more subdued Matte finish to blend in and not stand out in the field. To each their own though. Colors aside though, the K-50 seems to be a mild update to the K-30 which from what I saw was a very nice camera delivering very good image quality with the right lenses. The color options will likely be popular in many of the international markets. Dessert or forest camo? Maybe one of each? I would have to have better then base kit lenses to be happy. In the end it is always about the image first for me. Choice is nice though.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2013 at 01:16 UTC as 22nd comment | 1 reply
On Introducing... What The Duck on dpreview.com article (62 comments in total)

Nice!

Direct link | Posted on May 18, 2013 at 15:21 UTC as 32nd comment
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 Preview preview (416 comments in total)

Okay folks, who took the GH3 out on their vacation. A lot of those sample photos are definitely not Seattle or anywhere in the Pacific Northwest. Looks to me like someone went Island hopping with it. (Some nice photos though. I'm just jealous.)

Direct link | Posted on Mar 15, 2013 at 03:17 UTC as 28th comment
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 Preview preview (416 comments in total)

I'll just say, thanks for the updates.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 15, 2013 at 00:44 UTC as 31st comment

Thanks for posting these. Looking forward to further updates.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 13, 2013 at 01:33 UTC as 21st comment
In reply to:

Geoff666: Does anyone else use Apple Aperture?

I find it works pretty well and I would be interested on how it compares with the others in this review...

A very interesting review nonetheless...

@Geoff666 I also use aperture. I understand why it wasn't included (not cross platform) but prefer Aperture still. I also have a fully licensed version of Lightroom 3 but after checking out Lightroom 4 demo, which is a nice improvement over 3, still prefer using Aperture and didn't feel upgrading to 4 worth my time or money. A lot depends I guess on which features are important to individuals, but I like my Aperture workflow and the quality of conversion I get from it. - And no it doesn't take anything close to 20,000 worth of equipment or software to use a Mac, and even ACHD video can be done easily enough, it is just handled a little differently.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2013 at 01:53 UTC
On CP+ 2013: Panasonic interview article (202 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: Think about this as a financial decision for a company. Why would they want to implement a feature that helps a few customers use an antiquated procedure(Manual Focusing) with lenses from other manufactures?

My guess is that management and marketing said “No” because they would much rather have the resources work on better Auto Focus tracking so they can sell more of the $1000+ lenses they are making or plan to make in the future.

The fact that he mentions resources at all indicates that they just didn’t think adding this feature was worth pulling their engineers off of something that is easy to advertise about(Fastest Continuous Auto Focusing in the World) for something that only a very select group of users will ever understand its value(Focus Peaking).

Just because 90% of the requests are for focus peaking doesn’t mean that 90% of the people want it.

On the matter of focus peaking, be clear about what they said, without directly speaking it. Yes focus peaking is highly requested, but at the present it can't be just "added on" to current models because of the Venus engine not being designed to handle it. That doesn't mean they won't consider it for "future" models of their higher end cameras. But it will require a "new" venus engine and therefore a new model. Can't be added through a firmware upgrade. Quote: "Because it is not included in the Venus Engine, focus peaking is very hard to introduce - anything we added in software would be very different."

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2013 at 14:39 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 Preview preview (416 comments in total)
In reply to:

Steveke: Lots of reviews coming out. It may be possible to make a decision based on these, expecting that dpreview will confirm the general drift:

http://www.43rumors.com/new-gh3-tests-and-reviews/
Lumix Gh3 and Canon 5D Mk2 iso noise comparison

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JIZsvgZCqMg
Panasonic GH3, winner of this years Advanced CSC in Photography Weeks Gear Awards 2012.

http://www.naturalexposures.com/corkboard/testing-panasonics-newest-micro-four-thirds-camera-the-gh3/
natural Exporures (see response 12 as well as the review)

http://filmmakermagazine.com/61709-shooting-angels-with-the-panasonic-gh3-in-mexico/
Shooting Angels with the Panasonic GH3 in Mexico

http://coffeeandcelluloid.com/panasonic-gh3-review-coffee-and-quick-thoughts/
Panasonic GH3 Review – Coffee and Quick Thoughts
This is the first time I’ve ever pre-ordered a camera, and I’ll just say I’m not at all disappointed.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/panasonic_gh3_field_review.shtml
the GH3

While I value greatly DPR's reviews, they are seldom the first to fully review a new camera so here are a rew of other reviews I found interesting in the meantime until DPR does complete their review.

http://www.digitalcamerainfo.com/content/Panasonic-Lumix-GH3-Digital-Camera-Review.htm (note based upon a pre-production camera).

http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/panasonic_lumix_dmc_gh3_review/

http://www.pocket-lint.com/review/6088/panasonic-lumix-gh3-compact-system-camera-review

http://www.naturalexposures.com/corkboard/testing-panasonics-newest-micro-four-thirds-camera-the-gh3/

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2013 at 01:41 UTC
In reply to:

SantaFeBill: Once more with feeling ...
In response to what seems to be a misunderstanding that has shown up in several posts here (and I see in others on DPR):

An f/2.8 lens is an f/2.8 lens, period. F-values are a measure of the size of the aperture vs.the focal length of the lens. Or: Fstop=focal length/aperture. These are the _only_ two factors determining a given f-number. The size of the sensor that the lens will cover is irrelevant as far as the f-stop is concerned.

So a FF 150mm f/2.8 lens mounted on an m4/3 body via an adapter will have exactly the same maximum f-stop as an m4/3 lens on that body, provided the adapter doesn't change the effective focal length of the FF lens. (Assuming the lenses are correctly spec'd by the makers.)

Actual light transmission is measured in T-stops, of course, which is why pro video shooters use lenses calibrated that way.

If you want more detail, of if you think I'm wrong, Google 'f-stops' or 'f-number' and read the articles.

(continued) Now, when we talk about a 45mm on m4/3 being equivalent to a 90mm on a full frame, what we are really talking about is the angle of view. 45mm on m4/3 will have the same "angle of view" as a 90mm on a full frame camera. The aperture for either lens does not matter. The equivalent "angle of view" will be the same. These terms and relationships were derived from the decades of 35mm film and used to describe relationships between various formats, but since so many photographers today, have no association with film based formats and little historical relationship to the terms, they are often misunderstood, especially when people do not identify the specific value or parameter they are referring to.
Apeture = Quantity of light. It is a mathematical formula that is constant.
Shutter = time of exposure.
ISO = sensitivity of the recording medium.
Equivalent lens = Angle of View.

There can be occasional technical variations, but they are out of the norm.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2013 at 04:49 UTC
In reply to:

SantaFeBill: Once more with feeling ...
In response to what seems to be a misunderstanding that has shown up in several posts here (and I see in others on DPR):

An f/2.8 lens is an f/2.8 lens, period. F-values are a measure of the size of the aperture vs.the focal length of the lens. Or: Fstop=focal length/aperture. These are the _only_ two factors determining a given f-number. The size of the sensor that the lens will cover is irrelevant as far as the f-stop is concerned.

So a FF 150mm f/2.8 lens mounted on an m4/3 body via an adapter will have exactly the same maximum f-stop as an m4/3 lens on that body, provided the adapter doesn't change the effective focal length of the FF lens. (Assuming the lenses are correctly spec'd by the makers.)

Actual light transmission is measured in T-stops, of course, which is why pro video shooters use lenses calibrated that way.

If you want more detail, of if you think I'm wrong, Google 'f-stops' or 'f-number' and read the articles.

These silly battles just go on and on, mostly because many people do not include the necessary qualifiers or do not understand the qualifiers.

As the OP stated, F2.8 is F2.8 and has nothing to do sensor sizes, etc. It is merely a measurement of the light passing through a lens to its recording medium, regardless of the size or type of recording medium. Aperture is "quantity of light", Shutter speed is "time of exposure" or how long the quantity of light exposes the recording medium. ISO is the "sensitivity of the recording medium. These are the 3 elements of exposure in photography.

When some people talk about a 45mm F2.8 m4/3 lens being equivalent to a 90mm Full Frame lens at F5.6, they can do so correctly only if they include the qualifier of "Depth of Field". 45mm at F2.8 on m4/3 will provide the same depth of field as a 90mm on full frame at F5.6. It is not the maximum aperture or equivalent aperture, it is specific to "depth of field"

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2013 at 04:38 UTC
On Best Camera of 2012: And the Winner is... article (1412 comments in total)
In reply to:

new type: I thought OM-D was from 2011

It or something like it was rumored in 2011, but the actual camera which was not quite like the rumors, was announced Feb 2012.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 1, 2013 at 02:59 UTC
On Best Camera of 2012: And the Winner is... article (1412 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike_61: I don't think that you can chalk up the OM-D win to fanboy-ism. With roughly 15,000 votes cast, it would seem to be a large enough sampling to give a valid statistical conclusion. Mind you, I haven't the coin for one just yet, but would love to shoot one of my own (OM-D) eventually. ;)

Ditto Mike! Don't have money for one now, but if I did it is at the top of my list for now (Though the GH3 look interesting as well). Prior to the OMD-EM5, I had just about written Olympus off in recent years. But after reading the reviews, comparing hundreds if not thousands of sample shots, looking at the entire system including lenses, and briefly handling (how it feels in ones hand is important to me) of the listed camera I really felt it was the camera of the year and I had not seen any of the so called campaigning in the Olympus or MFT forums which I had not visited in some months. But in so many ways, the EM5 really broke the mold for digital and especially MFT cameras and put together an end to end system with tremendous flexibility while not breaking the bank or weighing down the user. It was for me, the camera of the year and there was no fanboyism involved. Since I have no commitment to any particular system at the moment, all options are open.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 1, 2013 at 02:57 UTC
On Dpreview Users' Poll: Best Camera of 2012? article (1511 comments in total)
In reply to:

IrishhAndy: It's Dec 31st.

Hmmm! DPReview offices are out of Seattle, Washington which is PST (Pacific Standard Time) now. Still got 40+ minutes before it is Dec 31st for them.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 31, 2012 at 07:19 UTC
On Dpreview Users' Poll: Best Camera of 2012? article (1511 comments in total)
In reply to:

TheDigitalCruiser: I'd add the Panasonic Lumix FZ200 to the list. I've gotten superb results from it that rivals my OM-D and RX100 in quality when results are blown up to 13x19" or shown on a 28" Apple Monitor; and it proved more versatile than the OM-D which I have equipped with 2 zooms and the 14mm, 25mm and 75mm Lumix lenses. Couple it with the RX100 for a 2 camera, 2 pound (total) combo. Despite theoretical problems with the small sensor, it functions extremely well in practice and the 2.8 aperture from 25mm-600mm is unexcelled by any 2012 camera regardless of price. Add weather-proofing and it would be virtually perfect.
My votes would go for the FZ200, the RX100 and the OM-D in their respective classes.

@Timmbits. To keep things accurate, the FZ200 has a 25-600 constant F2.8 aperture. The aperture does not change as you zoom. Something no other camera on the consumer market has, and I believe this is what TheDigitalCruiser was referring to. The Fuji SX-1 while a nice and capable camera has a 24-624 zoom that is F2.8 at wide angle but stops down to F5.6 at its longest focal length. So that factor of the FZ200 stands alone in design and excellence among all super-zoom cameras.

Now since no "super-zooms" are in the list above, perhaps DPReview could do a poll on super-zoom cameras as well, as they are a unique, popular and competitive class of their own.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 21:44 UTC
On Dpreview Users' Poll: Best Camera of 2012? article (1511 comments in total)
In reply to:

deneb1984: please how many of you have the sufficient knowldge of the whole cameras so to give a reasonable correct judment?
or rather your comments are rising only from your beloved brand and not from a real technical competence?

@pdelux - I voted for the OMD-EM5 at this time, always subject to change as the market changes.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 28, 2012 at 02:08 UTC
On Dpreview Users' Poll: Best Camera of 2012? article (1511 comments in total)
In reply to:

deneb1984: please how many of you have the sufficient knowldge of the whole cameras so to give a reasonable correct judment?
or rather your comments are rising only from your beloved brand and not from a real technical competence?

Well, what qualifies as sufficient knowledge or correct judgement? I have more then 47 years of experience with photography, 13+ of that as a professional doing military, industrial, scientific, biomedical, etc work. I have worked with everything from 8X10 view cameras, down to modern tiny digital sensors. I started with digital in 2001. These days I am a casual photographer, but one with a lot of experience. I don't have any strong brand loyalties, but look for what is the best balance of features and feel for my needs. I don't consider any of my "opinions" to be correct for everyone. Am only concerned with how a camera works with and for me. I also recognize that there is no one "perfect" camera, but different cameras for different purposes and needs. If I could, I would spend my time testing and playing with every major camera out there. But that is not an option at this time...

Direct link | Posted on Dec 27, 2012 at 22:29 UTC
On Dpreview Users' Poll: Best Camera of 2012? article (1511 comments in total)
In reply to:

David247: The best camera is always the camera you have in hand, but this poll is a popularity rating. There are many good cameras these days, in fact you have to go out of your way to find a bad camera. Not every camera can be in the list. A lower "popular" rating does not make a camera bad. Not making the list doesn't make a camera bad. I grew up in a time when large format and medium format were still the kings. 35mm, including Leica was often considered a "toy" camera due to "poor image quality". However versatility and portability of 35mm won the heart of "field" journalists". It was 35mm, with its then inferior image quality, that made photography popular as it is today. Look back into the photos of the 50's and 60's. Many of the images were seriously substandard in quality, but their spontaneity and reality changed the world. In the end it is always the photographer that makes the image and the difference. Pick the tool that works best for you. No bad choices here.

@sellerbird666, I also voted and don't own any of the cameras. Let my clarify "popularity" to mean the camera that is most interesting or enticing to end users for a personal variety of reasons. These votes do not represent only owners, but prospective owners, wishful owners as well, those who are not looking to buy but enjoy researching the progress of technology, etc. and what they find interesting. (My choice of words could have been better.)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 27, 2012 at 22:18 UTC
On Dpreview Users' Poll: Best Camera of 2012? article (1511 comments in total)

The best camera is always the camera you have in hand, but this poll is a popularity rating. There are many good cameras these days, in fact you have to go out of your way to find a bad camera. Not every camera can be in the list. A lower "popular" rating does not make a camera bad. Not making the list doesn't make a camera bad. I grew up in a time when large format and medium format were still the kings. 35mm, including Leica was often considered a "toy" camera due to "poor image quality". However versatility and portability of 35mm won the heart of "field" journalists". It was 35mm, with its then inferior image quality, that made photography popular as it is today. Look back into the photos of the 50's and 60's. Many of the images were seriously substandard in quality, but their spontaneity and reality changed the world. In the end it is always the photographer that makes the image and the difference. Pick the tool that works best for you. No bad choices here.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 27, 2012 at 15:52 UTC as 60th comment | 4 replies
Total: 36, showing: 1 – 20
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