GaryJP

GaryJP

Lives in Hong Kong Hong Kong
Works as a TV Production, Directing, Shooting, Editing
Joined on Mar 11, 2006

Comments

Total: 933, showing: 61 – 80
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In reply to:

jkoch2: Solution: make a wide-angle bodycam part of every cop's kit, just like his badge, gun, or phone radio. A fraction of the cost of all the automobiles uses, or the legal expenses, overtime, or public destruction that occur when things go wrong and the evidence is missing or tainted.

Feidin Santana, the man who captured video of a cop shooting a fleeing, unarmed man in the back, dreaded turning over the video. There was obvious fear of the blue line and the dominant public omertà on matters of police dealiings with "those people."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/04/09/meet-the-man-whose-video-led-to-murder-charge-against-south-carolina-cop/

"while carrying a handgun" Was the video taker carrying a handgun?

Anyhow it is every similar to the gag laws in Spain. Sometimes people have to decide which laws to break.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2015 at 01:31 UTC
In reply to:

SnakePlissken: A police officer who shot someone in the back 8 times as he ran away in South Carolina has been charged with murder. It also appears that he falsified the crime scene by moving a taser to the dead body to support his case that the man had taken the officer's taser. Without video footage, no way would the officer be charged with anything. This is why the police are afraid that their para-military activities are not recorded:
http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/apr/07/south-carolina-police-officer-murder-charge

And the person who shot that footage says he was in fear for his OWN life.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2015 at 00:27 UTC
In reply to:

jkoch2: Solution: make a wide-angle bodycam part of every cop's kit, just like his badge, gun, or phone radio. A fraction of the cost of all the automobiles uses, or the legal expenses, overtime, or public destruction that occur when things go wrong and the evidence is missing or tainted.

Feidin Santana, the man who captured video of a cop shooting a fleeing, unarmed man in the back, dreaded turning over the video. There was obvious fear of the blue line and the dominant public omertà on matters of police dealiings with "those people."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/04/09/meet-the-man-whose-video-led-to-murder-charge-against-south-carolina-cop/

That is exactly what the US Justice department is recommending

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2015 at 00:26 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: I really do believe that most people who believe "the cops are always wrong" will be shocked at the outcome here.

These bodycams will MOSTLY vindicate the police, and prove the suspects were lying about brutality or improper conduct. Of course, in a few cases they will support the suspects version. But the real incidence of police brutality may be much smaller than the police haters think it is.

Edgar. Let me guess. Your politics veer towards the right?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 16:06 UTC
In reply to:

stdavid: This a little off topic but still relevant IMO.
Police departments here in Canada are studying the use of police wearing cameras both still and video as part of their uniforms.
The City of Calgary is doing a pilot study:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/facial-recognition-body-cameras-used-by-calgary-police-target-of-privacy-probe-1.2824803

I have no great love for the police I have encountered recently, having been on the receiving end of tear gas, witnessed police brutality and pepper spray. The evidence might disappear, but under police regulations it is required not to disappear. It could actually work against him or her NOT to have any video when a "customer" complained.

They can bring in what laws they like. People in protests will still film the cops for their own protection.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 08:50 UTC
On Canon XC10: What you need to know article (233 comments in total)

This has taken a lot of people by surprise. Now watch them spit.

I am interested in it, but have to wait and see whether its performance is better than my GH4 with pro Zuiko lenses. Very tempting though, and not outside the price range for a freelance video producer.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 05:51 UTC as 15th comment
On Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal article (812 comments in total)
In reply to:

bluevellet: lol

more people claim to have had this camera than those who claim to own it or just want to own it.

Always happens.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 05:47 UTC
On Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal article (812 comments in total)
In reply to:

PieterB: The datastreams for 4K are, if I am not mistaken, 16x the datastream of 1080P.
It seems to me that if you want edit videos, you will need a very powerfull computer and a very large HD.

I already edit 4K on Premiere on my Mac with no problem whatsoever.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 05:45 UTC
In reply to:

stdavid: This a little off topic but still relevant IMO.
Police departments here in Canada are studying the use of police wearing cameras both still and video as part of their uniforms.
The City of Calgary is doing a pilot study:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/facial-recognition-body-cameras-used-by-calgary-police-target-of-privacy-probe-1.2824803

Captura, it is happening in a lots of places, but the issue is how they should be used. The US Department of Justice has a study called "Implementing a Body-Worn Camera Program". The file can be found in Google. Very strong guidelines for when the camera should be turned on, he fact it should not be turned off, and when it should immediately be grabbed by a supervisor.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 05:38 UTC
In reply to:

stdavid: This a little off topic but still relevant IMO.
Police departments here in Canada are studying the use of police wearing cameras both still and video as part of their uniforms.
The City of Calgary is doing a pilot study:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/facial-recognition-body-cameras-used-by-calgary-police-target-of-privacy-probe-1.2824803

I agree with you completely. But everything depends on an independent court system not accepting evidence that is not incontrovertible. As with a dashcam, old footage can roll off the end. But if you are involved in any controversial incident, you should be able to stop and save the last half hour or however long.

In some jurisdictions they are considering an auto record function, so that as soon as a confrontation is in progress, the camera starts. For example, as soon as officer steps out of car. There are ways to cheat it, but they are visible.

I recently spent a lot of time at the protests in Hong Kong. Enough to know that protesters themselves should keep cameras running at all times because the public have no clue how shamelessly the police lie and lie and lie.

And also, running cameras are protesters' best defence against paid "patriotic" thugs.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 03:30 UTC
In reply to:

balios: What if I'm standing 15 ft away from the incident, but have a 15 ft long selfie stick?

The police will claim the selfie stick is a weapon. They themselves often use telescopic truncheons. And they can even claim to mistake an iPhone for a gun.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 00:33 UTC

Look up "Spain gag law" or "Ley Mordaza" and you will find frightening things about the authorities' determination to shut down videos of cops behaving improperly.

Several other countries are considering similar legislation.

Just a few provisions:

Photographing or recording police – 600 to 30.000€ fine.
Peaceful disobedience to authority – 600 to 30.000€ fine.
Not formalizing a protest – 600 to 30.000€ fine.
For impeding or stopping an eviction – 600 to 30.000€ fine.
For presence at an occupied space (not only social centers but also houses occupied by evicted families) – 100 to 600€ fine.
Random identity checks, allowing for racial profiling of immigrants and minorities.
Police can now carry out raids at their discretion, without the need for “order” to have been disrupted.
External bodily searches are also now allowed at police discretion.
The government can prohibit any protest at will, if it feels “order” will be disrupted.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 00:32 UTC as 9th comment
In reply to:

icexe: You know I can actually understand why the police don't want to be filmed. Videos can be edited or taken out of context to portray an incident as unprovoked police abuse.

Courts can view ANY edited video put before them with scepticism. Only an uncut time coded shot is really reliable evidence. Luckily, in the case of HK's protests, that has been available. And cops have been caught lying because of it.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 00:20 UTC
In reply to:

stdavid: This a little off topic but still relevant IMO.
Police departments here in Canada are studying the use of police wearing cameras both still and video as part of their uniforms.
The City of Calgary is doing a pilot study:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/facial-recognition-body-cameras-used-by-calgary-police-target-of-privacy-probe-1.2824803

I have been working with video cameras of all sizes for decades. I also have a friend who supplies arms and resources to police departments and paramilitary organisations. Not the most moral of jobs, but it's his life.

The tech is available now. Time code is the easiest thing in the world to install. Even dashcams, not much bigger than police video cams, have it. Timecodes can also be external, i.e. synched to internet clocks, to avoid tampering. Whether people wish to apply it is another thing.

Not many "incidents" last longer than thirty minutes. Courts just need to make it clear that any break in time code compromises the evidence of video cams to the point of rendering "evidence" useless. I would think any defence lawyer worth his salt would.

If you view this footage, you see every camera, including body cams, has a time code.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=69b_1391652971&comments=1

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 00:03 UTC
In reply to:

stdavid: This a little off topic but still relevant IMO.
Police departments here in Canada are studying the use of police wearing cameras both still and video as part of their uniforms.
The City of Calgary is doing a pilot study:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/facial-recognition-body-cameras-used-by-calgary-police-target-of-privacy-probe-1.2824803

Lawyers should insist all body cameras have time codes, and breaks in the time code automatically get video evidence thrown out. It really is that simple.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 8, 2015 at 12:16 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: I really do believe that most people who believe "the cops are always wrong" will be shocked at the outcome here.

These bodycams will MOSTLY vindicate the police, and prove the suspects were lying about brutality or improper conduct. Of course, in a few cases they will support the suspects version. But the real incidence of police brutality may be much smaller than the police haters think it is.

I have seen first hand police behaviour at protests, most recently the Occupy Central protests in Hong Kong. YOU are wrong. The reason they don't want to be filmed is their lies get thrown out by the courts once the video makes them obvious.

As a language examiner, I have interviewed, and I do not exaggerate, hundreds of police officers. It certainly attracts people of a certain mentality and they certainly mostly believe courts and human rights are their enemy.

To be any use legally, police body cameras really should have time code running, and ANY jump in the time code should get them thrown out of court as evidence. Immediately.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 8, 2015 at 12:12 UTC
In reply to:

icexe: You know I can actually understand why the police don't want to be filmed. Videos can be edited or taken out of context to portray an incident as unprovoked police abuse.

They can also prove misbehaviour, and I have seen DOZENS of videos showing that, and judges throwing out cases where cops said someone hit them and the video clearly shows they did not. .

Direct link | Posted on Apr 8, 2015 at 12:09 UTC
On Nikon D7200 real-world samples gallery posted article (145 comments in total)
In reply to:

Zvonimir Tosic: Sigma Art range? Better say, Sigma Industrial Microscope range.
I looked at the landscape pictures and waved off. Why?

Today's trend to insist so much on sharpness of the lens, turn scenes into a flat mishmash of sharply depicted details and no sense of atmosphere, or space someone would want to get into and feel cozy, and not cut onto sharp edges of everything.

Unless one focuses onto something in very close distance, and that blurs the background, the sense of space, much needed and is achieved by the proportionate lack of sharpness, is gone.

I absolutely hate new range of Zeiss and Sigma lenses just for that.

They don't offer the alternative of opening up? The fact that something is there does not make it compulsory.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 03:19 UTC
On DPReview Recommends: Selfie-Sticks article (138 comments in total)
In reply to:

sethmarshall: amd we wonder why our forums are filling full of morons.

In the home of brand wars and fanboys this has to be irony

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 02:17 UTC
On DPReview Recommends: Selfie-Sticks article (138 comments in total)
In reply to:

bernardly: Where are the selfie sticks for our DSLR and mirrorless cameras?

They are called tripods, gorillapods, long arms, random strangers, and self timers on cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 02:10 UTC
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