Magnus W

Magnus W

Lives in Sweden Sweden
Joined on Mar 2, 2003

Comments

Total: 36, showing: 21 – 36
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On Just posted: Our Sony NEX-7 in-depth review article (339 comments in total)
In reply to:

Petrus Magnus: Very, very interesting camera! What a pity, though, that Sony dispensed with its in-camera image stabilization, especially since many NEX-users will be using various adapted lenses that do not feature (functional) optical image stabilization.

@Cy Cheze: Yes, you can use the camera body body as a heat sink if the sensor is fixed, but in the SLRs/SLTs, you can get still video with in-body stabilization.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 15, 2011 at 20:46 UTC
On Just posted: Our Sony NEX-7 in-depth review article (339 comments in total)
In reply to:

offertonhatter: I don't often post, but with this camera I thought I might.
The whole concept of the CSC camera has come of age with this beauty.
Small size, DSLR sized sensor (albeit APS-C and not FF - but the latter would make the body too big) full control, built-in viewfinder, flip out screen etc etc.
Now I know that the Samsung NX10 had APS-C/viewfinder, but there was something about it I did'nt like the look of. This however ticks all the boxes.
Along with the Fuji X100, at harks back to those top quality 35mm compacts.

However, as the reviewsays, there is a downside and that is the availability of good quality lenses for the system. E-system lenses are known to lack edge to edge sharpness in comparison to the competition, especially the Panasonic ones, so I would like to see Sony now concentrate on a great lens range, including some excellent good priced primes (35mm F1.8 anyone).
As it is, oh so close, but with more lenses, then it will be the optimum complement to a DSLR. Kudos to Sony.

@tkbslc: Samsung and Sony are the only ones with a thin body allowing glassless adapters and a 1.5x sensor. The 2x crop (and for me, the less attractive proportions of 4/3 -- yes I have a 4/3 camera) means that old lenses are just too long, or too bad.

@Bob: that depends on the market. I don't see classic Leica aficionados complain over lack of AF. So far, the market seems to have responded enthusiastically to adapted lenses, but of course the point-and-shoot crowd won't use such lenses. OTOH, those shooters will only have the need for the kit zoom and the tele zoom, both of which exist.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 15, 2011 at 10:45 UTC
On Just posted: Our Sony NEX-7 in-depth review article (339 comments in total)
In reply to:

Petrus Magnus: Very, very interesting camera! What a pity, though, that Sony dispensed with its in-camera image stabilization, especially since many NEX-users will be using various adapted lenses that do not feature (functional) optical image stabilization.

I agree. This is the number one irritation with the NEX system. I guess it must be to get the thinnest possible camera.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 15, 2011 at 10:36 UTC
On Just posted: Our Sony NEX-7 in-depth review article (339 comments in total)
In reply to:

offertonhatter: I don't often post, but with this camera I thought I might.
The whole concept of the CSC camera has come of age with this beauty.
Small size, DSLR sized sensor (albeit APS-C and not FF - but the latter would make the body too big) full control, built-in viewfinder, flip out screen etc etc.
Now I know that the Samsung NX10 had APS-C/viewfinder, but there was something about it I did'nt like the look of. This however ticks all the boxes.
Along with the Fuji X100, at harks back to those top quality 35mm compacts.

However, as the reviewsays, there is a downside and that is the availability of good quality lenses for the system. E-system lenses are known to lack edge to edge sharpness in comparison to the competition, especially the Panasonic ones, so I would like to see Sony now concentrate on a great lens range, including some excellent good priced primes (35mm F1.8 anyone).
As it is, oh so close, but with more lenses, then it will be the optimum complement to a DSLR. Kudos to Sony.

Well, with inexpensive and purely mechanical adapters, you can mount pretty much any lens ever made. It's now possible to build a system out of the absolute best lenses, from any manufacturer.

How's that for "more lenses"? ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 14, 2011 at 21:00 UTC
In reply to:

techmine: Its VC lens and are there few advantages of having VC in lens?

Actually the issue is more of a lens design one; in-lens IS must follow some specific optical rules. So lens design is somewhat more limited.

Personally I have found that in tele settings, IBIS is working as advertised; however, at short FLs, it's MUCH better. For me the hypothetical advantage of better IS at longer FLs is massively outweighed by stabilization of my short primes, my fast primes, etc; I'm sad Sony went with in-lens IS for the NEX series.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 11, 2011 at 13:51 UTC
In reply to:

MrDerekAnderson: Correct me if I am wrong, but doesn't Sony own a decent chunk of Tamron (10 percent?) and many of the current Sony alpha lenses are merely re-rebadged Tamrons. The 28-80 2.8 and 18-250 come to mind.

You are wrong. They are not "many", the rebadged Tamrons; in fact, only a small handful (Konica-Minolta were the ones starting it). If you disagree, please post which the lenses are.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 11, 2011 at 13:47 UTC
On Sony releases firmware v1.04 for SLT-A77 and SLT-A65 article (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

JR Johnson: It would be a major improvement if the firmware update corrected for the unforgivable low light performance from Sony's newest and highly advanced camera's. Which use the same APS-c Chip as the D7000, which they sell to Nikon and the a77 and a65 don't even hold a candle to its excellent low light low noise abilities.

I frankly can't fathom the releasing these almost great near do wells with such poor results in this area. I also find it amazing they can post such high review numbers when they clearly fall short in such a way regardless of the in camera Shake Reduction.

Well actually I can fathom it. They call it the Holiday Buying Season. And they seem to have taken a page from PC Game Development Company's who like to cash in before the product is really out of Beta Testing. Where in they release an as yet final product then scramble to add the games needed patches because they have a pent up market and want to strike while the iron is hot.

Noise performance area-for-area is exactly the same as from the much loved 16Mp NEX-5n, D7000 et al chip. If you compare pixel-for-pixel, yes, performance is worse with the higher resolution chip. But that is only interesting if you are interested in stating the obvious.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2011 at 05:55 UTC
On Ricoh to make 16MP APS-C GXR zoom module article (136 comments in total)
In reply to:

Magnus W: The GXR is such a great concept! A camera with a swappable camera. Wonder why no one thought of this before.

JensR, I do NOT understand. ;)

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2011 at 00:17 UTC
On Ricoh to make 16MP APS-C GXR zoom module article (136 comments in total)

The GXR is such a great concept! A camera with a swappable camera. Wonder why no one thought of this before.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 29, 2011 at 12:40 UTC as 14th comment | 8 replies
On Reviewed: Sony NEX-5N 16MP mirrorless camera article (195 comments in total)
In reply to:

wutsurstyle: They should make an optional K-adpater to utilize the family of small Pentax primes.

You mean like this?
http://www.rocksphoto.com/goods.php?id=978
Fact is, there are now adapters for almost every mount out there...

Direct link | Posted on Oct 4, 2011 at 13:57 UTC
On Nikon J1 real-world samples gallery article (336 comments in total)
In reply to:

Magnus W: I just don't get one thing.

All you Nikon shooters saying "great, we will get super teles FOR FREE", do you really think those lenses have 2.7x resolving power to spare?

Inquiring minds want to know.

m4/3 and p&s lenses are designed to resolve to their sensors, which F lenses also are of course. I happen to own a 24Mp full frame camera and can see it outresolving everything but my most expensive pro glass (300/2.8, 85/1.4 etc). 24Mp in APS-C is absolutely insanely much, and the V1 sensor is as you point out even more densely packed.

And the proponents of this as a tele camera are not pro glass users but rather "look now my old 300/4 will be a 810/4".

I just don't see that happening, but of course, digiscoping was in vogue once too...

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2011 at 12:09 UTC
In reply to:

Jim5k: I wanted smaller, but without sacrificing image quality. Why is Nikon so resistant to making a non-SLR APS-C camera? It seems absurdly easy to do. Just leave the mirror and pentaprism off of any dSLR.

I was a dedicated Nikon user in the film days, but I feel abandoned by them. Why no digital FM-2? They're still making the FM-10 - do they think we want film? Not me - I just want the manual control. So far the closest thing I found is the Panasonic G2. Super camera. Even works well with my old AI-S lenses (w/ adapter). Just wish it had an APS-C. The Nikon 1 went in the wrong direction for me. Looks like I'm "stuck" with M4/3rds.

wetsleet, your argument is a little hampered by the fact that Nikon's lenses for this system ARE NOT SMALLER than the competition.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2011 at 11:59 UTC
On Nikon J1 real-world samples gallery article (336 comments in total)

I just don't get one thing.

All you Nikon shooters saying "great, we will get super teles FOR FREE", do you really think those lenses have 2.7x resolving power to spare?

Inquiring minds want to know.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2011 at 10:47 UTC as 37th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

psn: This is like the Minolta Vectis S system... remember it? No? This, too, shall pass.

At least the Vectis system was splashproof, adding a LITTLE utility to an otherwise really stupid system.

In some ways I think this system is the most stupid ever released, in hard competition with the Pentax Q for sure but at least that camera is very small and decidedly earmarked as a "toy".

This camera is marketed as a photographic tool but is neither desirable as such or as an object.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 21, 2011 at 21:33 UTC
On Sony NEX-7 high-end APS-C mirrorless camera first look article (355 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike Sandman: Where is Canon in all of this? Its long time rivals Oly and Nikon have mirroless ILC; electronics competitors Sony and Panasonic have as well. It doesn't seem plausible that Canon would cede this whole class of products to others. Unless they produce an ILC product line like the NEX range they will lose a lot of market share.

Obican, multi-spot metering is neither an "experimental" feature nor was Canon first with it. Within the Minolta range, the 9000 beat the T90 with a year, and you could get multi-spot metering on all Miinolta cameras in the i and xi series featuring a card system.

But the Olympus OM-4 was the first AFAIK.

Canon's most experimental contribution ever is the all-electronic mount.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 29, 2011 at 08:00 UTC
In reply to:

Martin Datzinger: First of all I have to again salute Pentx for their innovative thinking. I'd love to have something like that on my Nikon. But I have one question: Does the sensor shift system also allow to rotate the sensor? Or how is that system supposed to function with wide lenses?

One of the features of Pentax' recent sensor-shifting is that it can rotate the sensor, yes. This was introduced in the K7 (although this astro mode isn't usable with that camera).

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2011 at 09:59 UTC
Total: 36, showing: 21 – 36
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