Joseph Black

Joseph Black

Joined on Jul 10, 2014

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On Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS50 real-world samples article (112 comments in total)

Hey guys, you realize you're about a five minute walk away from a ton of amazing glassblowers, right? You realize that Chihuly only organizes the contracts for all of these installations, right? Stumble into Martin Blank's studio one day when he and his team are working (his schedule is posted online) and you'll be welcomed with open arms and you might get some interesting pictures while drawing some attention to someone other than Dale (awesome though he may be.....he was mostly a trailblazer about thirty years ago and the fame stuck). Then a couple of blocks southwest from there is the Seattle Glassblowing Studio where they make amazing stuff that is really astounding.
See you guys around.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 23, 2015 at 19:17 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

Renzokuken: I'm from Asia and i live in Asia.

The DP team said they "garnered some surprisingly open admissions"

but if you really take time and read what he said, it's basically all sarcasm and arrogance.

"If another company made a sensor that we believed to be truly the best quality, we would not hesitate to use it."

He's implying that Canon sensors are superior in every way and no one can compete with them. Did the DP team really failed to pick up his sarcasm while interviewing him?

You think being asked time and time again "Hey, don't you think Sony is awesome? Shouldn't you emulate them since they're so awesome and you're so stagnant?" might not imbue the target with a bit of a paternal tone? His answer to the "We wouldn’t be surprised if they catch up to DSLRs at some point." question was very calm, measured, and telling. He acknowledged that he knew what others were doing and that once the market (not other makers, the market) indicates a direction they internalize it and compete amongst themselves to put the other departments out of business. Ever heard advice that you should compete with yourself? That's shorthand for being better than yourself and not using the behavior of others as a benchmark as though that's the best you can do and once you're beaten them you've won the game. He's saying that by trying to be better than they are they will never accept the status quo as good enough.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2015 at 19:43 UTC
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: “I’m saying “sell it!” but it’s their decision whether they want to or not.”

The one thing he got right someone else in the company got wrong. They are doomed!

Why should they innovate in the mirrorless space? There's no money in it. And why bother with it when they can ignore it into obscurity or non-existence? Once they get DP PDAF cheap enough and fast enough they'll be able to release an ILC into a vacuum and clean up. Until then they can save money on production by not building entirely new facilities, selling extremely competent cameras, and developing the real "mirrorless" market which is the large sensor point and shoot segment.
And thank your lucky stars Canon exists in the first place. If they weren't keeping the camera industry relevant by pushing everyone else to compete with their glass and their bodies, phones would have taken over long ago. Canon doesn't have to "innovate" (we certainly don't agree on what that word means) like you want them to because if they did then nobody else would have their little niches of non-profitability to innovate within.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2015 at 14:38 UTC
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I am guessing that everyone in the Dpreview office is crowded around just waiting for the comments to roll in. This interview is a gold mine for them. They couldn’t have wished for a better interview even if they had scripted it.

By way of example, I simply said I didn't think the 1.5 stop DR difference between ISO 100 and 800 (narrows as you go) is a huge advantage. I said it wasn't an issue. I said that in my opinion at this point in the evolution of digital technology the diminishing returns render this type of difference much less meaningful because image quality is of a caliber that the only reason someone would get excited about this type of difference is because there is so little of substance to really talk about in the field of camera technology. Boy, I was pounced on for speaking such blasphemy. I've seen changes, and when you go from terrible to much less terrible, from not being competitive with film to far surpassing it, suddenly these marginal improvements in technology become less and less impressive. What does remain impressive is true changes in technology like using an entire sensor for PDAF rather than relying on a separate sensor that can lead to inaccurate focus. You disagree.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2015 at 13:09 UTC
In reply to:

ZeneticX: Canon is like Apple now

they don't give two sh!t about the competition because they know no matter what products they roll out, there's a solid base of loyal customers that will buy them in an instant

You mean they force the rest of the market to innovate or die? Yep, that's Canon and Apple.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 21:37 UTC
In reply to:

Clint Dunn: Wow...he basically says Canon's only competition is within Canon....how arrogant. Yeah, I guess that's why I just changed systems after owning Canon equipment since 1999. I think maybe he should pull his head out of the sand; I know I'm not the only one who has dumped my heavy DSLR gear for a high quality mirrorless option.

Yes, boring. Taking good pictures isn't the point here, it's exciting gear junkies. If there are cameras you like, go buy them. Canon doesn't have to make a camera that will suit every person. Is that their sin? People are overwhelmed by the good cameras coming from all over in the last five years so Canon users are suddenly not left with one option?
I'm looking forward to new possibilities from faster processing, better sensors, and advancement of new tech but we're at a point now where I don't find anything from any company all that exciting. I think people need to come to grips with the industry maturing and quit making mountains of difference out of mole hills.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 21:34 UTC
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I am guessing that everyone in the Dpreview office is crowded around just waiting for the comments to roll in. This interview is a gold mine for them. They couldn’t have wished for a better interview even if they had scripted it.

Comments do, however, eat up time you could be spending doing something more substantive. They also show an emotional connection to something you should see from an objective point of view, but obviously do not. Why would anything here be depressing? They are cameras, not humans being repressed or puppies being thrown in the river. Cameras and opinions and your own personal involvement rather than detached communication of fact with a smattering of commentary on ease of use or ergonomics....or opinions stated as opinions rather than overplayed even if that comes in the form of commentary rather than directly within the review itself. You are on the record here, so now you are registering strong opinions not preferences or simple comments on the use of a camera.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 19:01 UTC
In reply to:

zigi_S: The elephant in the room hasn't been noticed. Namely sensor DR. Why?

Get together with DxO, combine a test procedure with a test result, publish both, and have some shots for comparison. THEN present the data and quit sensationalizing it and misinterpreting statements either intentionally, for effect, or because you dislike the person saying it.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 18:51 UTC
In reply to:

zigi_S: The elephant in the room hasn't been noticed. Namely sensor DR. Why?

Barney,
I'm afraid you aren't in a position to set the priorities of photographers. I didn't say there was no difference, I said there was no issue. It's not a problem. Why are no other issues treated with such high profile publicity? Why are practical concerns in other areas simply a footnote and a difference in technology is, for the first time in history, treated as though it is the difference between night and day? Back when noise was the most visible issue it was mentioned but was treated as marginal, simply as a difference in image quality that one should consider as part of the bigger picture. Now that noise has been dramatically decreased, the noise floor in RAW files is given special treatment in that one website has test data with no source material and another website associated with that one has test shots with no test procedure. There are some demonstrable differences and an informal comparison process on DPR, but most of the comments are hyperbole meant to stir conflict.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 18:49 UTC
In reply to:

Roman Korcek: "Canon offered a maximum pixel count of ~22MP for seven years before the launch of the EOS 5DS and 5DS R. Why did it take that long to increase resolution?

I wasn't actually aware that it had been seven years!"

This guy really cares about his company and its products.

He didn't notice because it isn't a benchmark one needs to consider. We all thought the megapixel wars had ended years ago. They got to a point where more megapixels raised red flags rather than sold cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 17:40 UTC
In reply to:

zigi_S: The elephant in the room hasn't been noticed. Namely sensor DR. Why?

Because it is a fictional issue. It is an issue for gearhead pixel peepers. It isn't something anyone else notices or even thinks about. It is a marginal issue, and only became so dominant in the minds of gearheads because there is so very little to actually talk about.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 17:37 UTC
In reply to:

Joseph Black: So the "chicken and the egg" scenario in this case puts the chicken before the egg. Many comments discuss Sony innovation as the pinnacle of human accomplishment in photography, but what they're actually talking about are Sony sensors and Sony bodies, but then if you want a lens you'll have to jump through some hoops. If you want to avoid a ton of gimmicks and glitches and difficult menus and that Sony color, go elsewhere. Nikon gets the lion's share of the praise for Sony sensors because they also have a lot of great lenses. And the company with the most lenses, the best lenses, and the most usable bodies has different sensor priorities and won't use Sony except in their point and shoot cameras, so they exist in a realm all their own that people either understand and agree with or revile and denigrate as unimaginative. I don't envy people who have to decide on a camera these days, but I don't regret moving away from Olympus back in the 80's and making the 10D my first DSLR.

As an example of popular lenses for a new mount. The fortunate aspect of the EF-S mount was that you could put EF lenses on an EF-S camera with no adapter. A brand new mount with no backward compatibility doesn't have an old mount with tons of lenses to use as a crutch (except via inane adapter, which is a step FE buyers probably find disconcerting when looking at the marketplace...the MATURE marketplace that the FE mount chose to compete with). THAT is called strategy. New mount and no decent native zoom lenses at mid-range price point. Now you can argue with yourself. You're being intentionally obtuse or unintentionally narrow-minded. Either way, enjoy yourself.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 14:34 UTC
In reply to:

Joseph Black: So the "chicken and the egg" scenario in this case puts the chicken before the egg. Many comments discuss Sony innovation as the pinnacle of human accomplishment in photography, but what they're actually talking about are Sony sensors and Sony bodies, but then if you want a lens you'll have to jump through some hoops. If you want to avoid a ton of gimmicks and glitches and difficult menus and that Sony color, go elsewhere. Nikon gets the lion's share of the praise for Sony sensors because they also have a lot of great lenses. And the company with the most lenses, the best lenses, and the most usable bodies has different sensor priorities and won't use Sony except in their point and shoot cameras, so they exist in a realm all their own that people either understand and agree with or revile and denigrate as unimaginative. I don't envy people who have to decide on a camera these days, but I don't regret moving away from Olympus back in the 80's and making the 10D my first DSLR.

Oddly enough I can't find those in FE mount. Huh, I must not be familiar with how this google contraption works.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 14:28 UTC
In reply to:

Joseph Black: So the "chicken and the egg" scenario in this case puts the chicken before the egg. Many comments discuss Sony innovation as the pinnacle of human accomplishment in photography, but what they're actually talking about are Sony sensors and Sony bodies, but then if you want a lens you'll have to jump through some hoops. If you want to avoid a ton of gimmicks and glitches and difficult menus and that Sony color, go elsewhere. Nikon gets the lion's share of the praise for Sony sensors because they also have a lot of great lenses. And the company with the most lenses, the best lenses, and the most usable bodies has different sensor priorities and won't use Sony except in their point and shoot cameras, so they exist in a realm all their own that people either understand and agree with or revile and denigrate as unimaginative. I don't envy people who have to decide on a camera these days, but I don't regret moving away from Olympus back in the 80's and making the 10D my first DSLR.

Excellent debating skill, fellas. Flexible mid-range lenses aren't bigger risks, they're a slam dunk. A good 15-85, 17-55? Great EF-S lenses, reasonable cost, excellent quality images. Users would hate that.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 14:11 UTC
In reply to:

Joseph Black: So the "chicken and the egg" scenario in this case puts the chicken before the egg. Many comments discuss Sony innovation as the pinnacle of human accomplishment in photography, but what they're actually talking about are Sony sensors and Sony bodies, but then if you want a lens you'll have to jump through some hoops. If you want to avoid a ton of gimmicks and glitches and difficult menus and that Sony color, go elsewhere. Nikon gets the lion's share of the praise for Sony sensors because they also have a lot of great lenses. And the company with the most lenses, the best lenses, and the most usable bodies has different sensor priorities and won't use Sony except in their point and shoot cameras, so they exist in a realm all their own that people either understand and agree with or revile and denigrate as unimaginative. I don't envy people who have to decide on a camera these days, but I don't regret moving away from Olympus back in the 80's and making the 10D my first DSLR.

Excellent exaggeration and misinterpretation for effect....or poor understanding. Either way, I don't care. I was pointing out priorities that will not lead to early adoption by those that will make their sales numbers support more rapid development. Go for volume and then fill in the gaps at the higher end. All done. Don't agree? Good, talk to yourself about it.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 13:47 UTC
In reply to:

Joseph Black: So the "chicken and the egg" scenario in this case puts the chicken before the egg. Many comments discuss Sony innovation as the pinnacle of human accomplishment in photography, but what they're actually talking about are Sony sensors and Sony bodies, but then if you want a lens you'll have to jump through some hoops. If you want to avoid a ton of gimmicks and glitches and difficult menus and that Sony color, go elsewhere. Nikon gets the lion's share of the praise for Sony sensors because they also have a lot of great lenses. And the company with the most lenses, the best lenses, and the most usable bodies has different sensor priorities and won't use Sony except in their point and shoot cameras, so they exist in a realm all their own that people either understand and agree with or revile and denigrate as unimaginative. I don't envy people who have to decide on a camera these days, but I don't regret moving away from Olympus back in the 80's and making the 10D my first DSLR.

The PS3 consistently undersold xbox and wii, was consistently outsold in games by the older ps2 until they finally killed it, and was a huge disappointment to Sony. The PS4 sold well despite the lack of momentum because it stuck to gaming and a lower price point as compared to ms's attempt at a home entertainment system and had the oddly named, underpowered, zero big title, dumb new controller Wii U as non- competition in the next gen console wars/slaughter. You are clueless, kid. I've owned every ps system from day one and read sales articles for over a decade you fool. Talk about points failing.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 03:52 UTC
In reply to:

Joseph Black: So the "chicken and the egg" scenario in this case puts the chicken before the egg. Many comments discuss Sony innovation as the pinnacle of human accomplishment in photography, but what they're actually talking about are Sony sensors and Sony bodies, but then if you want a lens you'll have to jump through some hoops. If you want to avoid a ton of gimmicks and glitches and difficult menus and that Sony color, go elsewhere. Nikon gets the lion's share of the praise for Sony sensors because they also have a lot of great lenses. And the company with the most lenses, the best lenses, and the most usable bodies has different sensor priorities and won't use Sony except in their point and shoot cameras, so they exist in a realm all their own that people either understand and agree with or revile and denigrate as unimaginative. I don't envy people who have to decide on a camera these days, but I don't regret moving away from Olympus back in the 80's and making the 10D my first DSLR.

They are competing with a mature market. There lies the problem.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 20:37 UTC
In reply to:

Joseph Black: So the "chicken and the egg" scenario in this case puts the chicken before the egg. Many comments discuss Sony innovation as the pinnacle of human accomplishment in photography, but what they're actually talking about are Sony sensors and Sony bodies, but then if you want a lens you'll have to jump through some hoops. If you want to avoid a ton of gimmicks and glitches and difficult menus and that Sony color, go elsewhere. Nikon gets the lion's share of the praise for Sony sensors because they also have a lot of great lenses. And the company with the most lenses, the best lenses, and the most usable bodies has different sensor priorities and won't use Sony except in their point and shoot cameras, so they exist in a realm all their own that people either understand and agree with or revile and denigrate as unimaginative. I don't envy people who have to decide on a camera these days, but I don't regret moving away from Olympus back in the 80's and making the 10D my first DSLR.

For the vast majority of people, it's not terribly useful. Oh, it's not extremely expensive for $450, but look at the zoom ranges that most people would be interested in and how much they're charging. Compare it to every other lens maker on the market. Within the context of the current Sony system for this mount, it should be a 28-85 for $450. If this is a premium line with premium lenses then so be it. There is certainly a market for that.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 19:15 UTC
In reply to:

Joseph Black: So the "chicken and the egg" scenario in this case puts the chicken before the egg. Many comments discuss Sony innovation as the pinnacle of human accomplishment in photography, but what they're actually talking about are Sony sensors and Sony bodies, but then if you want a lens you'll have to jump through some hoops. If you want to avoid a ton of gimmicks and glitches and difficult menus and that Sony color, go elsewhere. Nikon gets the lion's share of the praise for Sony sensors because they also have a lot of great lenses. And the company with the most lenses, the best lenses, and the most usable bodies has different sensor priorities and won't use Sony except in their point and shoot cameras, so they exist in a realm all their own that people either understand and agree with or revile and denigrate as unimaginative. I don't envy people who have to decide on a camera these days, but I don't regret moving away from Olympus back in the 80's and making the 10D my first DSLR.

If they make a habit of it. I saw these lens announcements and for once allowed myself to express how strange and misguided the strategy is. No useful, high quality, and affordable lenses for such an "innovative" body? And when I use quotation marks there it's in the correct manner to indicate that others may use that term but I personally don't apply it in this case. So no more comments from me, brother. Want me to shut up then quit giving me things to respond to. If you keep talking TO ME I'll keep talking TO YOU (not yelling, but there are no italics here).

Direct link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 19:04 UTC
In reply to:

Joseph Black: So the "chicken and the egg" scenario in this case puts the chicken before the egg. Many comments discuss Sony innovation as the pinnacle of human accomplishment in photography, but what they're actually talking about are Sony sensors and Sony bodies, but then if you want a lens you'll have to jump through some hoops. If you want to avoid a ton of gimmicks and glitches and difficult menus and that Sony color, go elsewhere. Nikon gets the lion's share of the praise for Sony sensors because they also have a lot of great lenses. And the company with the most lenses, the best lenses, and the most usable bodies has different sensor priorities and won't use Sony except in their point and shoot cameras, so they exist in a realm all their own that people either understand and agree with or revile and denigrate as unimaginative. I don't envy people who have to decide on a camera these days, but I don't regret moving away from Olympus back in the 80's and making the 10D my first DSLR.

I thought that's how things worked here now. Canon articles and reviews and forums are dominated by people who actively dislike the brand in general and only stop their negativity about Canon to chatter on about Sony like giddy schoolgirls. Just falling in line with standard practice here.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 18:57 UTC
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