Joseph Black

Joseph Black

Joined on Jul 10, 2014

Comments

Total: 526, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

jrkliny: If you are a Canon fan you can rejoice in the steps taken by Canon marketing. The Canon T6 advisory originally promised the customers additional information on the sensor defect: "We are developing a solution and will inform you as soon as it is available." (This statement can still be seen in the DPR news release summary.)

I expected to hear what Canon did to resolve the problem and remove affected units from the supply chain. Instead it appears that they have reneged on their promise and they have quietly removed the above sentence from their advisory. Again, if you are a Canon fan, you can rejoice in the wisdom of their marketing department. Or you might consider them to be lowlife scum buckets for trying to ignore additional follow up for a serious issue.

Because they said "send in your camera and we'll fix it." By the way, in order to get email updates you have to register your product. Have you registered yours, jr?
Also, Canon also recently reminded people that if you happen to own an original 5D with a rare defect (that was disclosed and dealt with ages ago) they'll still fix it free of charge despite the warrantee expiring about 9 years ago. Canon service is awful -- they only give you ten years to notice if you've got a problem and have it repaired free of charge. If you'd registered your camera you would have gotten the bulletin several years ago, but if you're just now emerging from under your rock they say you're still taken care of.

Direct link | Posted on May 26, 2015 at 18:08 UTC
In reply to:

jrkliny: If you are a Canon fan you can rejoice in the steps taken by Canon marketing. The Canon T6 advisory originally promised the customers additional information on the sensor defect: "We are developing a solution and will inform you as soon as it is available." (This statement can still be seen in the DPR news release summary.)

I expected to hear what Canon did to resolve the problem and remove affected units from the supply chain. Instead it appears that they have reneged on their promise and they have quietly removed the above sentence from their advisory. Again, if you are a Canon fan, you can rejoice in the wisdom of their marketing department. Or you might consider them to be lowlife scum buckets for trying to ignore additional follow up for a serious issue.

jr, the problem has been solved.

Direct link | Posted on May 26, 2015 at 16:37 UTC
In reply to:

EDWARD ARTISTE: Im a canon guy, with my first body being a xsi. I havent bough another rebel since the t2i.

One main reason is the bodies feel especially cheap, with the plastic finish getting softer finished, greyer, and easier to scratch every year. The old xsi has almost a shine to it, but it looks liek a premium body compared to these cheapos.

I was able to play around with these bodies and the M3 in Bic camera japan- and man, i wanted to put them down, quick.

Shame, because i have yet to own a variable screen dslr, and i really would love to have one. but these rebels arent getting my money...just feels too cheap :(

Regularly checking your sensor at f/20 only makes sense if you ever shoot at f/20. If you can't see dust at f/11 and that's as high as you ever go checking for dust you can't see is begging for trouble. As for the sensor issue here, I absolutely think that if someone has an affected unit whether they shoot at f/11 or not they should have it replaced. And you don't have to test this camera at f/11 to see the issue, you open the mirror box and use your naked eye.
Black dot units are units that have already been serviced. This is a common technique with camera makers when marking a camera after a well known defect has been dealt with on a serviced unit.
If you're waiting for anything then don't hold your breath. The final solution is if you see the problem have it fixed. That's it. I would imagine that if someone registered their camera they'll get an email about it. If you don't see the problem and never check photo websites, then no worries. Canon even fixes the 5D free still.

Direct link | Posted on May 25, 2015 at 14:02 UTC
In reply to:

EDWARD ARTISTE: Im a canon guy, with my first body being a xsi. I havent bough another rebel since the t2i.

One main reason is the bodies feel especially cheap, with the plastic finish getting softer finished, greyer, and easier to scratch every year. The old xsi has almost a shine to it, but it looks liek a premium body compared to these cheapos.

I was able to play around with these bodies and the M3 in Bic camera japan- and man, i wanted to put them down, quick.

Shame, because i have yet to own a variable screen dslr, and i really would love to have one. but these rebels arent getting my money...just feels too cheap :(

Having seen the process in action I know how it's done and how tricky it is to avoid glitches. Other manufacturers do avoid this, as has Canon for many, many millions of units, but nobody has a perfectly clean track record and stuff happens. The solution is simple: replace the camera or sensor with one that doesn't have this issue. Send it in to service if you open your eyes and see the problem. If you don't see it, there is no problem. The end. Solved. The production issues have been solved as proven by the lack of a universal recall of the product; only a certain number of serial number are affected and if you've noticed that isn't expanding. You think there is going to be some huge statement of apology and guilt when all that is required is repair or replacement of a unit. You're inventing a problem of a much greater scale than reality.

Direct link | Posted on May 24, 2015 at 20:17 UTC
In reply to:

EDWARD ARTISTE: Im a canon guy, with my first body being a xsi. I havent bough another rebel since the t2i.

One main reason is the bodies feel especially cheap, with the plastic finish getting softer finished, greyer, and easier to scratch every year. The old xsi has almost a shine to it, but it looks liek a premium body compared to these cheapos.

I was able to play around with these bodies and the M3 in Bic camera japan- and man, i wanted to put them down, quick.

Shame, because i have yet to own a variable screen dslr, and i really would love to have one. but these rebels arent getting my money...just feels too cheap :(

Returning a camera that does not have the issue, which is visible to the naked eye, is really poor advice. They absolutely have found the source of the defect as evidenced by the group of serial numbers they released that might possibly have been affected. The process issue was an extremely minor one despite how it presents and is simply a matter of an extremely temperamental set of variables with one of those being minutely out of balance. The process that led to this issue is one that even manufacturers of extremely critical equipment can get wrong from time to time. These are not guesses, this is a well known outcome of a finicky process gone very slightly astray.

Direct link | Posted on May 24, 2015 at 14:13 UTC
In reply to:

Joseph Black: You say this occurred in most sailboat shots. Were the all moving away from you at a speed that might get them a couple of feet outside the focus plane between your focus lock and shutter release? I guess I'm asking, was this a swift click or was there a delay between focus and release?

That's a bummer. I've never needed to adjust my lenses using MFA, but I have sent them in to Canon occasionally for calibration. I wish they would hurry up with some sort of self-calibration using DP PDAF so the lens would truly be spot on across the range. I think MFA is just something they think would cause them more headaches at this consumer level.

Direct link | Posted on May 22, 2015 at 23:50 UTC

You say this occurred in most sailboat shots. Were the all moving away from you at a speed that might get them a couple of feet outside the focus plane between your focus lock and shutter release? I guess I'm asking, was this a swift click or was there a delay between focus and release?

Direct link | Posted on May 22, 2015 at 21:38 UTC as 76th comment | 4 replies

Great shots! Thanks guys and gals!

Direct link | Posted on May 19, 2015 at 17:28 UTC as 19th comment
On Canon EOS 5DS R real world sample gallery posted article (443 comments in total)
In reply to:

NCB: I hate these "here's the jpeg; now see what you can get from the raw file" examples. Totally ignores the fact that a couple of simple tweaks in Elements can dramatically improve what you get out of the jpeg.

NCB,
What you're suggesting is produce the exact same JPEG from the RAW file that the camera did. The camera already did that, so why would you not take advantage of the RAW file to show how a human being can improve upon the default JPEG output? The RAW file will always be tweaked because tweaking must be done to produce an image, and that includes the JPEG the camera produced.

Direct link | Posted on May 15, 2015 at 13:17 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (2981 comments in total)
In reply to:

K E Hoffman: As a marketing person..The releases seem a bit cynical. The DSLR market is slowing so lets do two nearly identical 50MP cameras neither of which feature wise will replace our older 20MP offering completely. So they will have to keep the old one (no used sales cannibalizing new sales) and add this. Then we can sell them another higher MP camera next year when we do REAL update.

This is Lime Coke, Vanilla Coke or Directors cut DVDs etc... its about marketing, not advancing the main 5D offering.. Then when they do a proper update to the 5dMKIII you get to buy the newer sensor again!!! but in a completer body.

Just think Theatrical Edition, Directors Cut, Collectors Edition, Box set DVDs etc. (Maybe a 5D Box Set is coming?) and we see how Canon appears to be looking to increase revenue .

If you're a marketing person then you should try to understand the market of which you speak. These two models vary only slightly and they aren't feature cameras, they're resolution cameras. Your metaphors are labored, wrong, and face-palm inducing. In any industry or artistic endeavor there will be the demanding user that needs a precision piece of machinery to optimize their workflow. Up until now that required the ultimate niche market, the medium format camera. Now there is a camera that really bridges the gap of convenience and size. Nikon made the first stride with a 36MP DSLR. Canon apparently figured out the manufacturing challenges involved with a FF sensor with the 7DII pixel density. People don't have any appreciation for that bit of innovation....manufacturing leaps in technology are so boring. What a sad state of perception when people don't recognize there is more to a technology than just it magically appearing on the shelves.

Direct link | Posted on May 15, 2015 at 02:48 UTC
On Canon issues product advisory for Rebel T6i/T6s article (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

John Usa: Canon must change their QC on new Rebel models as this is their second consecutive failure when introducing new models.
On the T5i model they had the hand grip turning white.
Now on this new T6 series they have these spots issues.
When is Canon going to have a decent, properly working and efficient QC?
A big shame on Canon. It must be quite embarrassing.

That was the T4i. They quickly acknowledged and fixed that minor issue. They also just announced a free fix to mirror issues on the 5D. Support and customer service isn't just getting things perfect on the first try but also fixing issues as they are discovered. Also, if you ever have issues with millions of cameras and dozens of designs, people think they've all happened one after the other and were completely ignored even if that's opposite of the reality.

Direct link | Posted on May 12, 2015 at 15:49 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (2981 comments in total)
In reply to:

The Straw Man: This will easily be the most loved/hated camera of 2015. 2400+ comments in a few hours. Amazing considering most here will not buy it. Can't wait to see what happens when the 4k 5dmkIV is announced.

IQ looks pretty awesome. Don't get the complaints about high ISO, anyone really planning on shooting street at night with a 50mp camera? It's not hard to bracket and a couple clicks in LR6 does the rest.

Nah, this is a continuation of an old article. I'm very tempted by this camera even though I don't actually need all of the resolution.

Direct link | Posted on May 11, 2015 at 22:18 UTC
On Canon issues product advisory for Rebel T6i/T6s article (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

En Trance: I think that the bigger problem is, "How did these cameras pass final inspection"?
What is Canon doing to prevent big problems like this from shipping out the door? Any other models? Do we wait for Rent-A-Camera to discover the next flaw?
Canon really had no choice other than repairing the cameras. I am not impressed with this damage control move. But it is good that they stood up.

Nikon users were furious. Canon users never cared. You're inventing a new reality. Nikon let it go for a long time. The people most entertained by the issue are those least aware of the different issues and the different strategies used to address it. I have yet to hear an outcry from large numbers of users with the issue. As with everything, confirmation bias prevails with most internet commentary; find what proves your point and ignore everything else.

Direct link | Posted on May 10, 2015 at 20:41 UTC
On Canon issues product advisory for Rebel T6i/T6s article (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

DaveE1: As has been said many times about Nikon recently... Canon need to have a good look at improving their quality control process when this latest mess is cleared up.

You're right. There is only room on the Internet for knee jerk reactions.

Direct link | Posted on May 10, 2015 at 01:47 UTC
On Canon issues product advisory for Rebel T6i/T6s article (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

Forever Young: I am a Canon fan boy, see my gears, and I still think that Canon is great, but how is it possible that they start selling a camera with such obvious problems? And it happens from time to time...! Yes, other companies, incl. Nikon, also had serious issues in the past, but my question is the same to all of them. How is it possible that Canon, or Nikon, etc. sell defective products?

Canon and their contractors have done this for years on millions of cameras. We don't even know how widespread the issue is. New production lines sometimes have issues. I've bought enough electronics to know being an early adopter is risky. Period. No excuses, just the world we live in. Apple, Canon, Sony, Microsft, Asus, HP, and all electronics makers occasionally have production issues. Warrantees exist for a reason. Be an adult.

Direct link | Posted on May 10, 2015 at 01:45 UTC
On Canon issues product advisory for Rebel T6i/T6s article (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

En Trance: I think that the bigger problem is, "How did these cameras pass final inspection"?
What is Canon doing to prevent big problems like this from shipping out the door? Any other models? Do we wait for Rent-A-Camera to discover the next flaw?
Canon really had no choice other than repairing the cameras. I am not impressed with this damage control move. But it is good that they stood up.

A minor glitch in a process that has been included in millions of cameras and suddenly the whole glass industry is indicted. This was done by a contractor who specializes in these coatings and the very complex process had a small variation that caused a defect. En, you must lose your mind any time something fails no matter how long you've had it because you attribute it to ignorance and incompetence rather than things not being eternal and perfect.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2015 at 20:43 UTC
On Canon issues product advisory for Rebel T6i/T6s article (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

En Trance: I think that the bigger problem is, "How did these cameras pass final inspection"?
What is Canon doing to prevent big problems like this from shipping out the door? Any other models? Do we wait for Rent-A-Camera to discover the next flaw?
Canon really had no choice other than repairing the cameras. I am not impressed with this damage control move. But it is good that they stood up.

En,
What you're saying is pure emotion, mainly blind anger. Technology is so incredibly complex that the slight chance something like this could happen would mean that, by your strategy, we'd simply all live in the dark ages....or it would take fifty years to qualify a design. Chances are this issue only affects a tiny percentage of cameras. What you're saying essentially is if there is a chance that one part out of the thousands in a camera could possibly be defective we should either let it sit in a warehouse and test it for a year before shipping...which would mean you'd also have to shoot a few thousand frame and oull the a camera apart dozens of times for inspection....or never ship it at all. The warrantee is a year and most last way past that. Get real.
And "physics" is real, so just physics. You won't hope and wish technology in to working, so it actually requires science like physics and chemistry. Too bad cameras don't work on anger rather than batteries.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2015 at 12:27 UTC
On Canon issues product advisory for Rebel T6i/T6s article (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

iAPX: Canon had a QA problem, but they handle it the right way, by checkimng things carefully, determining witch batches are impacted, then issuing a product advisory to have them checked and repaired (probably with a new sensor!).

Errors could happens, and will, the thing that differentiate peoples and companies are the way we handle them. And Canon is hopefully doing the right thing!

No, the defect will not develop later on. The crystals will only form within a certain time frame or not at all, and if the camera doesn't have parts from the batch(s) affected then there is zero chance of a camera being affected. So, the only ones affected are those that are visibly affected right now.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2015 at 18:56 UTC
On Canon issues product advisory for Rebel T6i/T6s article (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

jrkliny: This explanation is obviously incomplete. If only a few cameras were affected, why is Canon still working on a "solution"? I suspect the problem has not been fixed. I also suspect that this problem developed after manufacturing and QC checks were completed. Until Canon has a complete explanation and "solution" I would not trust any of these cameras. If I owned one, I would return it and certainly not exchange it for another unit which might also be defective or develop the defect at a later date. I would return it even if the defect was not yet noticeable.

Nobody said this issue didn't exist. Nobody said it wasn't a concern. Nobody attacked those pointing out the issue. The person overreacting to the issue was labeled as overreacting and that's all. If you want the camera, go buy it. Look at the sensor and within five seconds you'll know if you need to swap it for another one.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2015 at 18:38 UTC
On Canon issues product advisory for Rebel T6i/T6s article (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

jrkliny: This explanation is obviously incomplete. If only a few cameras were affected, why is Canon still working on a "solution"? I suspect the problem has not been fixed. I also suspect that this problem developed after manufacturing and QC checks were completed. Until Canon has a complete explanation and "solution" I would not trust any of these cameras. If I owned one, I would return it and certainly not exchange it for another unit which might also be defective or develop the defect at a later date. I would return it even if the defect was not yet noticeable.

rrcad, the axe grinding is aimed at all Canon products. This is a convenient issue to blow way out of proportion.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2015 at 17:34 UTC
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