BartyLobethal

BartyLobethal

Lives in Australia Adelaide, Australia
Works as a Lobster Grooming Consultant
Joined on Apr 21, 2011
About me:

Inventor of Dehydrated Water.

Comments

Total: 195, showing: 41 – 60
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In reply to:

Raist3d: So sad to see Russia doing this. I hope the rest of the world can serve as a living example of why this is ridiculous.

@ogl, the heart is a muscular structure that has evolved for the purpose of pumping blood around the vascular system. It is neither a measurement nor sensing device.

The brain, of course plays a vital role in material analysis so you are definitely on to something there.

I haven't found the New Testament very useful in terms of answering pretty much anything new in the world over the last two thousand years. I couldn't, for example, find the part numbers for the windshield wiper blades for my Subaru in it anywhere. It also fails to either mention explicitly or even vaguely predict any of the patterns of the universe discovered and described over the last thousand years or so, including those that led to your ability to make these puzzling statements electronically from so far away.

I'm glad to hear that not everybody in Russia shares the point of view about gays expressed by your political or church leaders, or explicit in the actions of those who bash gays to death.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 06:29 UTC
In reply to:

Raist3d: So sad to see Russia doing this. I hope the rest of the world can serve as a living example of why this is ridiculous.

@Peiasdf, "ego" is an idea. There is no sense in which an idea can be said to exist independently of the material world - all ideas are transmitted by physical processes and stored in material substrates. In that very literal sense ideas are subject to material analyses. That is of course true of any idea including "sin", but doesn't speak to the universality (or utility) of an idea.

Although self-awareness and the possession of a sense of one's place in the social order are likely universal, the concept of "ego" is not. It is a cultural phenomena with little to no conceptual authority outside its originating culture. It is not culturally independent in the way that hyrdogen or iron are. Nor is "sin".

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 06:19 UTC
In reply to:

Raist3d: So sad to see Russia doing this. I hope the rest of the world can serve as a living example of why this is ridiculous.

ogl, can you quantify this "sin" of which you speak? What is its frequency and wavelength? What is its molecular structure? Where does it sit on the periodic table? How big is it? What does it weigh? What device can I use to measure it? What theoretical branch does it derive from? I'm sure you will have a reasonable answer to at least one of those questions, otherwise it seems you are just making stuff up.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 05:33 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M5 II First Impressions Review preview (1392 comments in total)
In reply to:

LarryLatchkey: looking forward to the EM-5's price falling. I love great deals for out-of-production cameras ^^

The E-M5 falling to AU$500 was all the stimulus I needed to get into mft.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2015 at 23:53 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M5 II First Impressions Review preview (1392 comments in total)

For some reason I haven't read all 663 comments below, so this has probably already been floated, but I'd be most interested in the 63MP output if it could be 2x2 binned in camera to a 16MP (15.75 for pedants) 12-bit file. Excellent colour with extremely low noise?

Who's up for that?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2015 at 21:54 UTC as 173rd comment | 1 reply
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (3411 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ronan_M: was someone screaming for 50Mp?

Yes. I only own one lens - a 24mm prime - and I'd rather have a 50MP camera so I can radically crop everything instead of buying longer focal-length lenses. Because an image taken at 24mm but cropped to an equivalent FOV as 300mm will be the same image as one taken with a 300mm lens, don'tcha know.

Of course that's a rubbish argument, but one that you see often enough.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2015 at 06:06 UTC
On 3,200MP LSST camera gets construction approval article (257 comments in total)
In reply to:

jwkphoto: It's only 3.2 gigapixel, a little better than the Hubble at 1MP, but what wonderful images that 1MP has given us!

Hubble's replacement, the James Webb, is overdue for launch. I look forward to its commissioning. Even the false-colour images derived from its infrared data should be amazing (never mind the science objectives that have little to do with keeping me entertained).

Adaptive optics has largely overcome the issue of atmospheric refraction at least for visible wavelengths. The more thermally stable and quiet environment of orbit might be a greater factor for imaging at longer wavelengths - one of the reasons WMAP & Kepler & others were sent to far more distant orbits.

The 24 hour operation is a bonus, but weighed against the cost of launch, payload restrictions and the enormous cost of servicing missions, restricted operational windows is the price paid in exchange for the ability to build and operate 'scopes of enormous objective size here on earth.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 3, 2015 at 20:56 UTC
On 3,200MP LSST camera gets construction approval article (257 comments in total)
In reply to:

jwkphoto: It's only 3.2 gigapixel, a little better than the Hubble at 1MP, but what wonderful images that 1MP has given us!

Despite the initial hiccup with the incorrectly figured primary mirror, Hubble was ultimately a revolution in astro-imaging. Each new hardware upgrade and advance in signal processing produced ever more breathtaking images.

However, the development of adaptive optics has undermined the case for orbiting 'scopes to some extent.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 3, 2015 at 10:15 UTC
On 3,200MP LSST camera gets construction approval article (257 comments in total)
In reply to:

(unknown member): From the producer of Avatar, Star Wars, 2012 and Terminator. And Kunta Kinte (known as "Roots").
And introducing the DPR multi-Gold/Platinum/other alien metals Award winner. A camera that represents the pure notion of "Sony". And eventually, Cher.
A camera with a DR that will redefine IMAX, IMIN, 40:9, and all other industry standards. Combined.
The camera you always wanted.

But will still find something to complain about...

Direct link | Posted on Feb 3, 2015 at 10:09 UTC
On 3,200MP LSST camera gets construction approval article (257 comments in total)
In reply to:

locksley: What? No built in flash? What were they thinking?

Yes, with a guide number of 8,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (at ISO 100 f1.4)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 3, 2015 at 10:08 UTC
In reply to:

Papi61: So, the "generation selfie" will now have selfie "stamps" all over their body. Just when you thought nothing could top their narcissism...

It's OK. They will disappear up themselves entirely before too much longer. Problem solved.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 08:06 UTC
On Adobe details OS support for next version of Lightroom article (229 comments in total)
In reply to:

sssanti: I hope Lightroom 6 includes a major upgrade to the book module so that the user can define custom page sizes and create custom layouts. The current book module is not usable. It can only create photo books for ordering through Blurb and it does not give the flexibility to modify page layouts.

Well, the point is that the book module is Blurb's, not Adobe's. It's not that Adobe couldn't provide us with their own fully-featured book module, they chose not to. The idea of building and integrating their own with LR was presumably discarded at some point in favour of this relationship with Blurb. So, for the foreseeable future, development on the book module will be up to Blurb. I've tried Blurb's standalone modules and found the one integrated into LR just as good if not better. Yes, it's clunky and constraining, and probably there to satisfy the same demographic as the links to facebook etc. If you want true flexibility, Adobe want you to subscribe to Creative Suite.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 28, 2015 at 20:58 UTC
On Adobe details OS support for next version of Lightroom article (229 comments in total)
In reply to:

sssanti: I hope Lightroom 6 includes a major upgrade to the book module so that the user can define custom page sizes and create custom layouts. The current book module is not usable. It can only create photo books for ordering through Blurb and it does not give the flexibility to modify page layouts.

I suspect that will depend on Blurb rather than Adobe. Having tried a number of photo-book programs, I've found the Blurb module in LR less limiting than the others. Of course, compared to something like InDesign they are all pretty limited.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 24, 2015 at 01:40 UTC
In reply to:

GaryJP: I love the smell of brand wars in the morning.

Point for the Apocalypse Now reference.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 01:08 UTC

I admire Toni's commitment. I could make it a NY resolution to do something like this, but I know me. I'd already be behind by Tuesday next week.

Well done Toni.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2014 at 02:30 UTC as 21st comment | 1 reply
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1933 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: What are we all complaining about? Just 6 years ago we had pathetic burst rates, 12 Megapixels was the Max instead of the min available, Video was non existent, Quiet shutters were almost unheard of, Auto Focus was only slightly better than manual focus, and the cameras cost more than they do today.

If you can't take great pictures and videos with the latest cameras then you really can't blame the camera anymore.

All of the above specs are useless unless both camera and lens have "Pro version" printed prominently on them. It's the only way to be sure.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 20, 2014 at 22:50 UTC
In reply to:

photo_rb: This is a little off topic, but how many think that black and white photography is only valid when it is done with b/w film, or perhaps a monochrome sensor?

@photo_rb, how is it any less "honest" if the photographer had a B&W image in mind when taking the photograph and converts the image to B&W during processing?

Why might it be "dishonest" to take it with the intention of producing a colour work, then deciding at some later time that it actually works better as B&W?

Presented with three B&W images - one taken with a monochrome camera, one in colour with the intention to convert later, and one converted on a whim - but with no insight into the photographer's original intention, how would you detect or quantify the level of "honesty" present in each one?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 12, 2014 at 21:53 UTC
In reply to:

photo_rb: This is a little off topic, but how many think that black and white photography is only valid when it is done with b/w film, or perhaps a monochrome sensor?

Not me either.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 12, 2014 at 05:19 UTC
In reply to:

skiphunt13: So, let's say I had a friend who could spare $7million. I get him to buy one of my prints, generate a bunch of press releases about how "Now there's a new King of the Mountain! Skip Hunt has now beat Peter Lik for the most expensive image ever sold at $7Million!" Or something like that.

Now I bask in all the press glory, read all the articles about how my work isn't worth it, lots gf blogs recycle the story all over the net, different magazines print the story, news programming runs with it, interviews with me on morning programs, and then on to the nighttime talk shows, the value of the rest of my work skyrockets, a new photo-super-star is born, people who don't know better feel like paying $250k for a "Skip Hunt" is a bargain by comparison, etc.

You get the picture.

Meanwhile, somewhere down the trail I quietly "gift" my wealthy friend back his $7mil and a little extra for his trouble.

Jus sayin...

;)

Try the following:
a) Borrow the $7 mil from your friend.
b) Find an obscure artist who produces 'contemporary' work.
c) Pay them $6 mil for one of the pieces. Get them to throw in another 20 as a 'job lot' for the remaining million.
d) Capitalise on the rise of the perceived value of their work by selling the 20 pieces for ten times what you paid for them.
e) Pay your friend back with fair interest.
f) Keep the first piece and market yourself as a sophisticated collector and 'patron'.

It's less work, more money, and you survive being 'flavour of the month.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 12, 2014 at 03:07 UTC

I don't think there's enough veiling flare for it to be considered aesthetically valid. The photographer seems bound by the conventions of contrast, acuity and composition.

He probably hasn't spent enough time agonising over minor design limitations of his camera.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 12, 2014 at 02:45 UTC as 132nd comment | 1 reply
Total: 195, showing: 41 – 60
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