HowaboutRAW

HowaboutRAW

Joined on Sep 1, 2011

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On Leica M9 users report sensor corrosion issue article (379 comments in total)
In reply to:

uhoh07: Also, why has the M9, MM or 240 have never, as far as I can tell, received a full review on this site? I did see an M8 review, and M9 preview, and a four page romp "shooting with the M9-P."

Love it or hate them, these are benchmark digital systems and can be easily rented, one has to wonder why such short shrift at DP?

Preferably such review would be done with the help of a working Leica pro, to avoid the all to common DP foible of "I can't get used to where they put such and such button".

The Leica takes practice to use effectively. I bought the M9 solely for the results with RF wide glass, and at first found the focus and framing method difficult real world. But 11 months later I far prefer the M9 to frame and focus over my A7 even at high speed.

Most hysterical is the DXO rating of the M9 sensor, which simply proves their numbers measure values which are irrelevant to many of us, and certainly have nothing at all to do with how sharp an image will be with a lens attached.

RS:

Most who make claims like that can't see well, or have never bothered to look.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 26, 2014 at 14:09 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike FL: Recall? It was OIL_Leaking, and now is FLARE.

Will Nikon recall/fix this D750's FLARE as Nikon did for OIL_Leaking before?

BTW: Leica/Pana need looking into LX100's FLARE problem too to find the cause and possibly fix it in the next batch.

Mike FL:

First paragraph: Define "abnormal" flare. The D610 has this problem so too the 6D, and the 1DX and others. So then it seems pretty normal.

I can't say that Panasonic didn't do some of the design work on the LX100's lens, however the lens sure has the Leica look and colour. See I'm not dismissing the idea that flare may be easy to induce with the LX100, but I've not seen it in my samples. And the LX100 doesn't have an AF sensor placed like a DSLRS's, it also doesn't take interchangeable lenses, so why bring it up?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 26, 2014 at 02:10 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

sandy b: Good articles here:

https://photographylife.com/nikon-d750-flare-shading-issue#more-98857

http://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2014/12/24/nikon-d750-flare-problems-heres-why-and-what-to-do-about-them-its-not-lens

Bottom line? others do it too, perhaps not as, but the shots are still ruined.

Still a gold camera.

Pat Cullinan Jr:

You do understand that it happens under very limited circumstances?

The problem is visible in all of the Imaging Resource examples. Yes strongest in the D750 samples, but if it were in any image it would be a problem. So yes, it's even a problem for the samples from the Canon 6D.

Technological "advances" aren't what you think. Tech regresses all the time, and still people buy music downloads from the iTunes store.

When you buy your D750, don't shoot into strong light with the light source just above, and outside of, the image frame.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 26, 2014 at 01:52 UTC
On Leica M9 users report sensor corrosion issue article (379 comments in total)
In reply to:

plesage: Three sensor changes in the fours years i have owned a M9....
Leica store in Paris blamed it on me because i use my camera in a tropical environment.....and i was warned that I will have to pay for the next sensor change !!!!

Well, now at least you have something from Leica to point to.

And why go through a store? It it required in France that one use a retailer for this kind of repair.

Would seem that contacting Leica Paris directly would be the way to go, particularly if you expect the service under warranty.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 26, 2014 at 00:58 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

WACONimages: Max shutter speed of 1/4000s, Limited buffer capacity affects continuous shooting, Slow AF in live view, no 4K. For a camera this price...

No doubt the sensor and handeling will be top. We live in 2014 at the edge of 2015. The above cons are easy to overcome by Nikon, but for some reason the don't want to..

marc,

I've not seen a lot of distortion at the wide end of the Samsung 16-50 f/2.0-2.8.

Careful Nikon also uses Renesas sensors in full framed cameras, and yes, like the Nikon/Sony combination in say the D750, those are better high ISO sensors than the APSC one in the NX1--not a surprise.

The 85mm lens for the NX system is optically better than at least the shorter "S" zoom, I've not tried the other longer zoom.
And the S 16-50 is amazing. So misleading about the count of the best Samsung lenses, then there are other very good NX lenses, like the 45mm.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 26, 2014 at 00:47 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

sandy b: Good articles here:

https://photographylife.com/nikon-d750-flare-shading-issue#more-98857

http://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2014/12/24/nikon-d750-flare-problems-heres-why-and-what-to-do-about-them-its-not-lens

Bottom line? others do it too, perhaps not as, but the shots are still ruined.

Still a gold camera.

V:

Right, the D750 is more extreme, but those others (both Nikon and Canon) are easy enough to see.

The problem is that the "fall off" looks stepped.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 26, 2014 at 00:25 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike FL: Recall? It was OIL_Leaking, and now is FLARE.

Will Nikon recall/fix this D750's FLARE as Nikon did for OIL_Leaking before?

BTW: Leica/Pana need looking into LX100's FLARE problem too to find the cause and possibly fix it in the next batch.

M:

And as you know I was referring to the flare issue.

You can read up on the details of how to reproduce it here, at this Imaging Resource link:

http://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2014/12/24/nikon-d750-flare-problems-heres-why-and-what-to-do-about-them-its-not-lens

You should know that other full framed DSLRs suffer similar problems for similar reasons, so no Canon 6D for you.

As for the LX100, and flare, TechRadar mentions it. But that's not a Nikon camera, FYI.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 21:14 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

Carlos Loff: Nikon has become overpriced on its top cameras - If Nikon does´t care about that it will run down hill - The Market is Out There !!!

Carlos,

That's preposterous:

Looking at the whole market of 2014 DSLRs, there aren't many close to the specifications of the D750, and many that that are cost more--the 5DIII, which doesn't have the ISO performance of the Nikon. There ones that cost less, say the D610 or Canon 6D, and they lack significant features.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 20:20 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

Carlos Loff: Nikon has become overpriced on its top cameras - If Nikon does´t care about that it will run down hill - The Market is Out There !!!

f8BeThereToo:

That's not an original point. And doesn't have much to do with my comment.

For lower ISOs, and with a good lens, a 2005 APSC DSLR is very capable of making excellent images, as is my 2001 Canon G2.

A 1981 IBM PC is useless for almost all computing purposes in 2014. (Albeit you could use it as a platform to write some code in BASIC.)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 20:14 UTC
On Medium well done: Two takes on the Pentax 645Z article (245 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dougbm_2: Then again a Sigma merrill seems to resolve as much. 3 for $3000?

EcoPix:

Don't ever go by Sigma/Foveon jpegs.

Get the XF3 files and extract with Sigma Pro Photo 6.1, or if you have a Mac you can try Iridient.

The Pentax 645Z is a better high ISO camera than any Sigma, but at ISO 100, say a Sigma Quattro, is easily a resolution rival to the Pentax--and the Quattro has an optically better lens.

I wouldn't want to use a Quattro to capture even slow moving things.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 18:30 UTC
On Lytro software update introduces Focus Spread feature article (104 comments in total)
In reply to:

Timmbits: In a world where everything is done via digital editing effects, there are many features I see advertised that can simply be accomplished with a small aperture, and defocusing effect in Lightroom or whatever.

As mentioned by HenryT macro might be the killer app for this technology.

T:

Right you can go through the effort of painting in blur with a normal image file. (It takes a while and requires skill.)

But you can’t paint in sharpness the way Lytro can process the already existing sharpness into a sharp image.

Also if you were to start with images captured with a small aperture, then in many cases you’d have to lower the shutter speed or increase the “ISO”.

There are huge possibilities you’ve ignored with this tech. There are huge limits to your proposed substitutions.

Lytro may not be the final word, or final party to come up with advances in this gear, but this Illum is a serious start. (I realize the DPR note is about software improvements.)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 18:20 UTC
On Lytro software update introduces Focus Spread feature article (104 comments in total)
In reply to:

threed123: Lytros are currently being dumped on sites like Yugster.com for $70. That said, back in the day of film I always had to select depth of field range with all my lenses. Today, I simply ignore it since digital cameras have smaller sensors and f/stops. I can easily post process parts of the image to be out of focus. Can't bring out of focus in focus though. But so what if I have good depth of field I rarely have anything out of focus. This camera remains a head scratcher for me.

If it gets us closer to holographic imaging, then I say--heck yeah.

Yugster.com, a website without a search box on the main webpage.

You've likely confused the company Lytro, which shipped other cameras, and this new Illum by Lytro.

Bet you can find a jpeg only Canon from 2012 on Ebay for $70.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 18:12 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

sandy b: Good articles here:

https://photographylife.com/nikon-d750-flare-shading-issue#more-98857

http://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2014/12/24/nikon-d750-flare-problems-heres-why-and-what-to-do-about-them-its-not-lens

Bottom line? others do it too, perhaps not as, but the shots are still ruined.

Still a gold camera.

sandy,

Thanks, those are very interesting links.

And helpful to learn how to repeat, and avoid, the issue.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 16:25 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike FL: Recall? It was OIL_Leaking, and now is FLARE.

Will Nikon recall/fix this D750's FLARE as Nikon did for OIL_Leaking before?

BTW: Leica/Pana need looking into LX100's FLARE problem too to find the cause and possibly fix it in the next batch.

Oh, no cameras have flare.

This D750 flare issue sure looks to be uncommon, even in shooting situations known to generate flare.

So way to over react.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 15:30 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

calson: What was overlooked is how when changes are made to camera settings such as aperture, shutter speed, ISO, etc. the entire rear LCD screen displays everything and uses a very large font that is more than 10x what one would usually see on a rear or top display on a Nikon camera.

It is interesting that Nikon put the tilt LCD screen on the D750 but not on the premier landscape photography camera from Nikon, the D810. With landscape shooting and in particular when using live view and a PC-E lens the ability to tilt the display with the tripod mounted camera is a tremendous benefit. Somebody's ego got in the way of adding this feature and functionality to the D8xx cameras.

steelhead3:

Not part of the original point.

And the D750 is a much better high ISO camera than the A77II, as is the D5300, which uses the same sensor as the A77II.

The Sony A77II has washed out raws at higher ISOs, this may be a compressed raw issue.

Right, the EVF on the A77II is nice, some still want an OVF, and will for years.

Turntables still sound better than CDs--and CDs have made some progress, finally. So drop the 1950s claims, it shows real ignorance. (Also SLT cameras, like the A77II, are 1960s era tech, with the addition of an EVF--irony.)

The A77II is a fine camera, it's not as tough as the Canon 7DII. And it has body build weakness the Nikon D810 doesn't.

But your constant defense of the A77II isn't doing that model any favors.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 14:35 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

calson: What was overlooked is how when changes are made to camera settings such as aperture, shutter speed, ISO, etc. the entire rear LCD screen displays everything and uses a very large font that is more than 10x what one would usually see on a rear or top display on a Nikon camera.

It is interesting that Nikon put the tilt LCD screen on the D750 but not on the premier landscape photography camera from Nikon, the D810. With landscape shooting and in particular when using live view and a PC-E lens the ability to tilt the display with the tripod mounted camera is a tremendous benefit. Somebody's ego got in the way of adding this feature and functionality to the D8xx cameras.

steelhead3:

And the original point was NOT about the advantages of EVFs, or disadvantages, anyhow most OVFs, for DSLRs, have a good bit of information.

The original point was about there being no folding screen on the D8xx.

Then, once it was explained to you why a folding screen isn't particularly tough, you raised a different issue.

And again, even when a folding screen is flat on the body, there are many more body penetrations for grit and water to enter the body through than with say the D810 or Canon 7DII.

Grit and water don't wait for you to fold the screen out. Both are a constant threat with the screen folded flat on the body.

You really don't know of what you write.

Also if you can't expose/focus correctly, even manually, with a current DSLR, and have to check every shot on the LCD, you're not familiar with your system.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 14:15 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

calson: What was overlooked is how when changes are made to camera settings such as aperture, shutter speed, ISO, etc. the entire rear LCD screen displays everything and uses a very large font that is more than 10x what one would usually see on a rear or top display on a Nikon camera.

It is interesting that Nikon put the tilt LCD screen on the D750 but not on the premier landscape photography camera from Nikon, the D810. With landscape shooting and in particular when using live view and a PC-E lens the ability to tilt the display with the tripod mounted camera is a tremendous benefit. Somebody's ego got in the way of adding this feature and functionality to the D8xx cameras.

steelhead3:

You don't know of what you write; in comparison to the Canon 7DII few cameras are particularly tough.

It is way simplistic to think that the problems with folding LCDs are only about the hinges, and that being able to flip some LCDs over for flat storage makes cameras tougher.

I'll spell it out:

With a folding LCD, of any type, there are many more body penetrations where grit and water can enter the body.

Then: With any type of folding LCD the hinges are points of weakness.

So you are wrong about folding LCDs ever being a way of toughening a camera.

There are easy and inexpensive ways of protecting a fixed LCD from breakage--these would be in addition to anything the manufacturer has already done.

Right, for a camera with a folding screen, the A77II is tough and well sealed.

Built-in flashes also constitute a point of body weakness, that's one reason that pro bodies like the D4S don't have them.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 13:50 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

HFLM: On Nikonrumors a response of Nikon can be found to one commentor:
"I am sorry to learn about your disappointment [...] however that we are aware of the this effect and Nikon considers it to be within the quality standards. When photographing scenes with an extremely bright light source (such as the sun or high intensity lighting) is at a certain position along the top border of the frame, this sort of visual effect is common and may occur when shooting using any digital SLR camera.Therefore it does not indicate a problem with the camera's design and we do not plan to implement any measures to address this."
http://nikonrumors.com/2014/12/22/nikon-d750-reflectionflare-issue-possible-solution-found.aspx/#comments

lcf:

Interesting to learn that there are claims the problem can indeed be reproduced with a bare light bulb and different lenses.

So what am I to think when I've very consciously shot into fluorescent bulbs and seen no problem?

Don't misunderstand, I do think people are describing a real problem, it just doesn't seem real frequent.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 02:23 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

HFLM: On Nikonrumors a response of Nikon can be found to one commentor:
"I am sorry to learn about your disappointment [...] however that we are aware of the this effect and Nikon considers it to be within the quality standards. When photographing scenes with an extremely bright light source (such as the sun or high intensity lighting) is at a certain position along the top border of the frame, this sort of visual effect is common and may occur when shooting using any digital SLR camera.Therefore it does not indicate a problem with the camera's design and we do not plan to implement any measures to address this."
http://nikonrumors.com/2014/12/22/nikon-d750-reflectionflare-issue-possible-solution-found.aspx/#comments

lcf80:

But does every D750 photo with a strong front light source have this problem? Or is this issue limited to some lenses in combination with that body?

Clearly the dozens of sample photos I've shot into strong fluorescent lights don't create this problem, so does that limit the problem to spot lights? And if so which kinds, including the sun?

The Flickr link you posted: Are you sure the D750 would fail you in that situation, have you tried one?

I'm sorry but it looks to be a very limited problem, possibly only in combination with some particular lens and lens setting. And it may not even be every D750 body that has this problem.

Cars, cameras, computers, table saws, etc have oddities, including weaknesses. I can think of a flaw, very real and very easy to find if you know what you're doing, in the amazing Festool rail saw system.

Web search: "2006 Honda Civic engine block"--I guess Honda did take responsibility. Unlike VW in 2001ish with Golf ignition coils.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 01:29 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1893 comments in total)
In reply to:

calson: What was overlooked is how when changes are made to camera settings such as aperture, shutter speed, ISO, etc. the entire rear LCD screen displays everything and uses a very large font that is more than 10x what one would usually see on a rear or top display on a Nikon camera.

It is interesting that Nikon put the tilt LCD screen on the D750 but not on the premier landscape photography camera from Nikon, the D810. With landscape shooting and in particular when using live view and a PC-E lens the ability to tilt the display with the tripod mounted camera is a tremendous benefit. Somebody's ego got in the way of adding this feature and functionality to the D8xx cameras.

Likely the reason Nikon avoided a tilt screen in the D810 is to make it more weather resistant and generally tougher. (All helpful if the landscape involves things like rain and ocean surf.)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 00:46 UTC
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