PIX 2015
NZ Scott

NZ Scott

Lives in New Zealand (Aotearoa) Malaysia, New Zealand (Aotearoa)
Works as a Communications Consultant
Joined on Jul 29, 2011
About me:

Formerly a news reporter for three daily newspapers in New Zealand. I now train English-language teachers in Malaysia - using school holidays for traveling, writing novels/short stories, playing chess and taking photographs.
My latest work of fiction can be viewed here:
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/444160

Comments

Total: 495, showing: 81 – 100
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On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 Review preview (451 comments in total)
In reply to:

thxbb12: That's a shame DPR didn't show a comparison of the EVF size compared to other models (Sony RX100 III, Panasonic LX100 and some other MFT bodies).
It's difficult to gauge how small it is compared to a "regular" MFT body (E-M10, GX7, etc.).

I find the GM5's viewfinder to be adequate for composition. I use it about half of the time when shooting, with the LCD for the other half.

On my Olympus camera I shoot with a VF-4, which is probably the best viewfinder on the market. Coming from the VF-4, the GM5's viewfinder seems like peering down a tunnel at an old TV set. However, it is still "good enough" to do the job.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 30, 2015 at 01:45 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 Review preview (451 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kawika Nui: Maybe good if you have really small hands. The GX7, which I love, is barely large enough to operate without accidentally hitting one of the various buttons. There's a functional limit to small.

It's not just the size of the camera that's important, but the way the controls are designed and laid out.

I have big hands. I own a GM5 and find it easy to operate without hitting the wrong buttons.

I find the GM5 to be more ergonomic than Olympus's E-M5 and E-M10, both of which are significantly larger cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 30, 2015 at 01:39 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 Review preview (451 comments in total)
In reply to:

kpaddler: "Not built for extended use in cold conditions"

As usual, DP doesn't disappoint with its useless points raised.

The camera lasts in cold weather longer than the people who carry it.

@Richard Murdey

Yeah, but that's not the case with the GM5 because, as I pointed out above, the battery life is fine if you switch the camera off when not shooting.

When travelling with the GM5, I can usually get through a day without changing batteries.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 30, 2015 at 01:35 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 Review preview (451 comments in total)
In reply to:

JohnHoppy: This review reads like someone deciding what shoes to wear. I love my GM1 too but it can't be all things to all men. I can see the GM5 improves on it in several ways,how can that be a bad thing? How do you give something a "Silver" then say, Ah but those APSC cams do the job better? Crazy! In one sense, they probably do, but their lenses are still way bigger. GM1 is my "go-everywhere" camera, it gets shots others don't because I don't tote all the bigger stuff , that's the point. Split hairs by all means, but 20x16s from this camera are bloody good. If you shoot black cats in coal cellars, sure, get that SLR. Up to ISO 3200 not much wrong with a GM1. And batteries? Don't you carry spares? - they're tiny!

As mentioned above, I've gotten 456 shots out of my GM5 without recharging so I don't consider the battery to be a problem at all - especially since a spare only costs $12 and weighs 32g (1 oz).

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 10:28 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 Review preview (451 comments in total)
In reply to:

kpaddler: "Not built for extended use in cold conditions"

As usual, DP doesn't disappoint with its useless points raised.

The camera lasts in cold weather longer than the people who carry it.

For what it's worth, I live in a warm climate and managed 456 shots out of my GM5 battery by avoiding chimping too much and switching the camera off between bursts of shooting.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 10:25 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 Review preview (451 comments in total)
In reply to:

BeaverTerror: "The RX100 III does offer something closer to true pocketability, a higher resolution sensor at 21MP, an articulated LCD and a faster lens."

Am I missing something?

GM5: 99 x 60 x 36 mm 281g
RX100 III: 102 x 58 x 41 mm 290g

And a faster lens isn't worth crap if the sensor is significantly smaller, which in this case it is; not to mention the Panasonic is an interchangeable lens camera.

nerd2: I'm sorry, but you are mistaken. The Sony RX sensor is only half the size of a M43 sensor.

This means that Sony's lens is equivalent to an f3.5-5.6 lens on M43 - in other words, it's equal to the Panasonic with its kit lens.

I considered buying an RX100 III and after trying it out in-store I thought it was a great camera. However, the GM5 was greater still, so I went for the Panasonic.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 10:18 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 Review preview (451 comments in total)
In reply to:

SMPhoto: I don't understand why manufacturers (other than increasing gross sales I suppose) come out with ILCs then don't offer them as body only.

The GM5 is available body-only.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 10:12 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 Review preview (451 comments in total)
In reply to:

photo perzon: Olympus E-PM2 weighs the same as GM1 or GM5 and has almost twice the DXO ISO performance and built in IS, and if you want you can put a VF-4 on it

Agree with AdamT.
There's absolutely no way that an E-PM2 has "twice the ISO performance" of a GM5. If there's any difference at all in image quality, it will be much less than a stop.
I shoot with a GM5 and an older PEN camera and the GM5 has much superior image quality.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 10:10 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 Review preview (451 comments in total)
In reply to:

morepix: I don't know if it's just a testing fluke or a real camera difference, but the studio comparisons at high ISO (1600, 3200) look a good deal better for the GM5 than for my LX100. I'm seeing my $900 going down the drain. :-(

Why is your $900 going down the drain? it's one of the best point-and-shoot cameras on the market. Of course the image quality is a bit worse than a system camera, but so what? It should still take great photos most of the time.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 10:08 UTC
On Last Position challenge (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

DENRAM: Has the entry got to be identical to the original challenge entry or is post original result additional processing allowed. For Example if the clarity and colours were improved over the previous entry (if possible) would this be permitted for entry?

I wouldn't think so.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 28, 2015 at 13:14 UTC
On Beautiful Dreamer: Garret Suhrie's moonlit landscapes article (57 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stitzer23: Nice pics. So, can these photos be taken with a cameraphone or a basic compact? No i didnt think so. The tool does matter. I wish people could just stop with the notion that the equipment is not important.

High ISO long exposures look rubbish from a smartphone even at normal viewing sizes.

There's also the fact that most of these shots were taken with ultrawide lenses / telephotos, whereas smartphones have fixed lenses.

Decent gear is essential for such images.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 23:55 UTC
On Beautiful Dreamer: Garret Suhrie's moonlit landscapes article (57 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stitzer23: Nice pics. So, can these photos be taken with a cameraphone or a basic compact? No i didnt think so. The tool does matter. I wish people could just stop with the notion that the equipment is not important.

happypoppeye: perhaps you could share some tips on how to take presentable long-exposure and high-ISO night shots with a smartphone?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 5, 2015 at 04:23 UTC
On Beautiful Dreamer: Garret Suhrie's moonlit landscapes article (57 comments in total)

Great shots - and an interesting tip on making snowfall look like mist.

Thanks for posting.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 5, 2015 at 04:20 UTC as 14th comment
On 1939: England in Color (part 1) article (222 comments in total)

Interesting shots. Thanks for posting.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 31, 2014 at 15:15 UTC as 3rd comment
On Happy Holidays from dpreview article (125 comments in total)

Thanks, DPReview, for providing this website, which I access most days.

I'm glad to hear that you're back to full strength and that more reviews are in the offing - I look forward to your full reviews of Micro Four Thirds gear, in particular.

Regards,
Scott

Direct link | Posted on Dec 26, 2014 at 11:17 UTC as 38th comment
On All-in-one: Ona Capri bag review article (168 comments in total)
In reply to:

NZ Scott: For the same price you could buy two Billingham Hadley Small camera bags that are stylish, tough, weatherproof, weigh 30 per cent less, are made of canvas, leather and brass and are made in the UK (rather than the Dominican Republic).

The Billingham Hadley Small holds much more than an ONA Bowery. Into my Billingham Hadley Small I can fit the following: An E-P3 camera body, a GM5 camera body, 12-32, 40-150, 12-35 pro, 17/1.8, 7-14 pro, numerous filters, three spare batteries, a battery charger, white card, etc. That's a fair amount of kit. If you Google-search "Hadley Small versus Bowery" you'll find a Fuji forum comparitive review from a guy who owns both showing just how much more utilitarian the Hadley is over the Bowery.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 26, 2014 at 09:56 UTC
On Starstruck: Adam Woodworth's nighttime photography article (60 comments in total)

Great shots and some interesting tips.

I've been meaning to try astrophotography upon my return to New Zealand next October (currently living in smoggy Malaysia). It's disappointing to hear that you need f2.8 ultrawide and a big full frame sensor for this kind of photography - I'm shooting Micro Four Thirds and an f4 ultrawide, which is a total of about three stops behind.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 24, 2014 at 05:57 UTC as 7th comment | 2 replies

I like it.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 13, 2014 at 00:11 UTC as 81st comment
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 First Impressions Review preview (301 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gesture: Smaller sensor. Smaller, less complicated camera than DSLR. $500 would be appropriate.

I paid the equivalent of USD $690 for mine and feel that it was worth it.

It's the best camera I've ever owned.

S

Direct link | Posted on Dec 11, 2014 at 13:15 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 First Impressions Review preview (301 comments in total)
In reply to:

JohnnyRC: I am liking the fact panasonic is focusing on expanding the range of these compact system cameras. I am surprised that there doesn't seem to be a lot of compact extreme wide angle cameras on the market (i.e. 14mm equiv.) This makes these models all the more handy and a lot lighter than a full frame DSLR with 14mm lens. Hats off to Panasonic for their wide angle 4/3 lenses. If you want to make this camera perfect, add aperture and exposure comp. dials and GPS and weather seals. GPS is high on my hit list. I use my camera for cataloging architecture, especially when travelling. There are many places that do not have easy street addresses and GPS provides me with a quick ability to Geolocate buildings and other features for future research purposes. Saves having to pull out notebooks and/or use phone to duplicate shots.

This camera already has aperture and exposure compensation dials. The main thumbwheel controls both of these functions. You simply press it into the body to toggle between the two.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 11, 2014 at 13:13 UTC
Total: 495, showing: 81 – 100
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