Paul Guba

Paul Guba

Lives in United States Red Bank, United States
Works as a Digital Imaging Professional
Has a website at http://www.gubavision.com
Joined on Nov 5, 2003
About me:

To take over the world

Comments

Total: 210, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Paul Guba: Comparing two cameras with similar sensors is like comparing two cars with V8 engines. The 645Z and the Alpa are two completely different machines. I won't justify the huge price difference but at the same time you can't compare the two as tools. Phase also has better software and years of experience getting the best data from a sensor. There both great cameras but the similarity ends at MP.

There are very few film era lenses I would use on a MF sensor especially wide angles. Did I test all of them, nope. I tested enough though. The difference is like an upgrade in your sensor.
FYI I am not blasting Pentax lenses at least the ones made recently. That test being quoted is what 25-30 years old. I have been shooting digital since the Leaf DCB tri-shot and that is at least 18-20 years ago.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2014 at 14:22 UTC
In reply to:

Paul Guba: Comparing two cameras with similar sensors is like comparing two cars with V8 engines. The 645Z and the Alpa are two completely different machines. I won't justify the huge price difference but at the same time you can't compare the two as tools. Phase also has better software and years of experience getting the best data from a sensor. There both great cameras but the similarity ends at MP.

Leaf and Phase were pretty much pioneers in digital cameras and software. Pentax was late entering the digital market. Phase cameras are made by Mamiya if I am recalling correctly and now its partnering with Alpa the premier technical camera currently. Pentax lenses are great but the old ones really don't compare with modern designs. Back in the day my Fuji A lenses were the best but when I tested them against a modern Schneider Digitar it wasn't even close.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 17, 2014 at 22:10 UTC

Comparing two cameras with similar sensors is like comparing two cars with V8 engines. The 645Z and the Alpa are two completely different machines. I won't justify the huge price difference but at the same time you can't compare the two as tools. Phase also has better software and years of experience getting the best data from a sensor. There both great cameras but the similarity ends at MP.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 17, 2014 at 14:56 UTC as 23rd comment | 28 replies
On BPG image format aims to replace JPEGs article (200 comments in total)

JPEG is not necessarily a very good format. It is HTML that made it universally accepted. It was substantially better then GIF and PING and relatively small so JPEG became the standard. That said without universal acceptance in browsers and HTML its a TIFF or PSD limited to people who edit images.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 17, 2014 at 11:48 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply
On Adobe to acquire Fotolia for $800 million cash article (23 comments in total)

Coming soon: Adobe now owns all the images you uploaded to Adobe Cloud, Behance, and changed or modified with Photoshop, Lightroom or Camera Raw.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 15, 2014 at 17:18 UTC as 5th comment
On WaterWeight rethinks the sandbag approach to stability article (77 comments in total)
In reply to:

Paul Guba: These have been around for years. As for myself I own sand bags but when in a pinch I just brought a couple gallon jugs of water for $.99 and tied a piece of string to them $.02. The price goes down significantly if you happen to save the containers from something else. I guess if I wanted to get fancy I could use one of my dry bags $18 and fill it with water, they also have a "port" large enough to accompany other things. It is laughable how anxious some people are to spend there money.

Because they're an asswhole. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 15, 2014 at 17:11 UTC
On WaterWeight rethinks the sandbag approach to stability article (77 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joe Mayer: Interesting. So once on site, you need a source of water. Or, you fill it before leaving and the benefit is upon going home you can empty it to lower weight. Or, once on site you need to find sand to fill it (or carry it to site full of sand). How is this different from using a cheap canvas bag and filling it with rocks when you get to the site? How is this different from carrying a bag of rocks to the site if there won't be any there with which to fill the bag? The difference is it'll be cheaper to continue to use a bag full of rocks or sand placed lower on my tripod where it belongs. If I had a nickle for every time someone came up with an idea for a problem that doesn't exist......

Maybe it appears here because DPR is a press release site for photography merchandise and owned by the largest online retailer in the world.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 10, 2014 at 13:21 UTC
On WaterWeight rethinks the sandbag approach to stability article (77 comments in total)

These have been around for years. As for myself I own sand bags but when in a pinch I just brought a couple gallon jugs of water for $.99 and tied a piece of string to them $.02. The price goes down significantly if you happen to save the containers from something else. I guess if I wanted to get fancy I could use one of my dry bags $18 and fill it with water, they also have a "port" large enough to accompany other things. It is laughable how anxious some people are to spend there money.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 10, 2014 at 13:18 UTC as 10th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Paul Guba: Surprising no one is talking about the use of LED in flash unit. I find that much more interesting then the duration.

The led on your smart phone camera is not a flash. Its a continuous light source that turns on when you take a picture.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2014 at 15:27 UTC

Surprising no one is talking about the use of LED in flash unit. I find that much more interesting then the duration.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 13:46 UTC as 9th comment | 5 replies

Just when you thought they were gone, they drag them back. Just in time for the holidays.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 25, 2014 at 21:23 UTC as 147th comment

That is to bad. Hard to compete with the Chinese manufacturers.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 20:31 UTC as 24th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Paul Guba: Tether support for 810?

Actually not. My friend called me from a shoot asking why his new camera wouldn't tether. I am stuck with a crappy D800 ;-) that tethers fine.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 15:31 UTC
In reply to:

Paul Guba: Tether support for 810?

Capture 1 has it. Guess not a priority for Adobe.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 12:13 UTC

Cool now we can have bad video that is lit.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 11:38 UTC as 8th comment

Tether support for 810?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 19, 2014 at 20:22 UTC as 17th comment | 4 replies
On Pentax 645Z added to studio comparison database article (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

Felix E Klee: In a professional context, for example for fashion photography in a studio, what is the advantage of a medium format camera today?

Today's full frame sensors and optics provide more than enough resolution for even very large printed ads, and dynamic range there is plenty as well. Furthermore, in a studio environment, I expect lighting to be perfect and the pro photographer to frame close to the final result.

For landscape photography medium format is interesting, but that's not my question.

Its not about the camera.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2014 at 13:40 UTC
On Pentax 645Z added to studio comparison database article (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

Felix E Klee: In a professional context, for example for fashion photography in a studio, what is the advantage of a medium format camera today?

Today's full frame sensors and optics provide more than enough resolution for even very large printed ads, and dynamic range there is plenty as well. Furthermore, in a studio environment, I expect lighting to be perfect and the pro photographer to frame close to the final result.

For landscape photography medium format is interesting, but that's not my question.

I shot 8x10 and 4x5 20 years ago. I know that answer and its not resolution.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 17, 2014 at 22:05 UTC
On Pentax 645Z added to studio comparison database article (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

Felix E Klee: In a professional context, for example for fashion photography in a studio, what is the advantage of a medium format camera today?

Today's full frame sensors and optics provide more than enough resolution for even very large printed ads, and dynamic range there is plenty as well. Furthermore, in a studio environment, I expect lighting to be perfect and the pro photographer to frame close to the final result.

For landscape photography medium format is interesting, but that's not my question.

In truth none. There is rarely the need for that kind of resolution in a commercial situation. The resolution is not driven by need but rather a perceived need or status. My experience was this. We all invested in digital gear shot images that went off to the retoucher. As better cameras came on the market a retoucher would say oh these files look better (aka bigger) even if there was no need for the files to be bigger. So Creative Directors hear the files are better but in truth they had little understanding about the process, they just heard this one is better. So the word comes back to the photographer, so and so is using this camera and we heard his files looked better. So you go out and buy or rent the newer camera. Its an image (ego) thing not an image quality thing. With a 22mp camera you can shoot 95% of any professional jobs and not be concerned about image quality.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 17, 2014 at 18:41 UTC
In reply to:

Anastigmat: A good idea the implementation of which has been long overdue. The medium format mirror box is a big obstacle to portability. It is bulky, heavy and it adds vibration by the truck load. Replacing it with an electronic finder makes even more sense than doing the same for35mm FF or APS-C size sensors. Next we may see medium format cameras with a collapsible bellows lens that can be used for street photography.

Its not new. Look at the Hassleblad SWS or the Sinar Handy both of which are over 30 years old.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 16, 2014 at 13:39 UTC
Total: 210, showing: 1 – 20
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