Macist

Macist

Joined on May 3, 2008

Comments

Total: 31, showing: 21 – 31
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On Just Posted: Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX100V review news story (71 comments in total)
In reply to:

Macist: I've had this camera for a few months now and it is the perfect travel superzoom, with one glaring exception: the GPS function is very poorly implemented.

Every time the camera is turned off, the GPS turns off as well, which means that it can take a minute or two after the camera is powered for it to be able to lock coordinates and tag the photo.

The delay means that the majority of the photos taken while traveling will not have GPS coordinates.

This is the only reason I would get rid of the camera (or advise someone not to buy it if they intend to use it as a travel camera).

Otherwise, the PQ quality is very decent (for a superzoom) and the versatile zoom range packed in a relatively compact camera, plus the usable viewfinder and HDR, make this one of the top choices for anyone looking for a superzoom.

If SONY can fix he GPS problem with a firmware (give us the option to keep the GPS On, while the camera is Off, like Panasonic does), this would be the best travel camera, period.

With few exceptions, I have found that the camera does well in intelligent auto mode, so I leave it there for 90% of the shots.

But the GPS is necessary for a travel camera, so that I can remember where a particular shot was taken five+ years from now. When one travels, it's basically:

"Wow, this looks good!" -- turn camera on, take a shot or two, turn camera off and keep going. No time for GPS to lock, so the photo is not tagged, and a few years (or even months) later, you start wondering if this was in village A or village B, plus often you have no idea what the name of the place was anyway.

To boot, with GPS tagging you can plot your trip on a map (virtually every online photo service provides this feature), which is actually kind of fun and cool :)

The mode changing delay has been much less of a hindrance for me.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 24, 2011 at 17:51 UTC
On Just Posted: Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX100V review news story (71 comments in total)

I've had this camera for a few months now and it is the perfect travel superzoom, with one glaring exception: the GPS function is very poorly implemented.

Every time the camera is turned off, the GPS turns off as well, which means that it can take a minute or two after the camera is powered for it to be able to lock coordinates and tag the photo.

The delay means that the majority of the photos taken while traveling will not have GPS coordinates.

This is the only reason I would get rid of the camera (or advise someone not to buy it if they intend to use it as a travel camera).

Otherwise, the PQ quality is very decent (for a superzoom) and the versatile zoom range packed in a relatively compact camera, plus the usable viewfinder and HDR, make this one of the top choices for anyone looking for a superzoom.

If SONY can fix he GPS problem with a firmware (give us the option to keep the GPS On, while the camera is Off, like Panasonic does), this would be the best travel camera, period.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 23, 2011 at 00:51 UTC as 13th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Tee1up: In terms of size, this is so close to that of a DSLR, one has to wonder why you would want this? The x100, x10 makes sense to me but I don't get this.

For those who travel, this can be a versatile camera without requiring you to lug additional lenses and swap them constantly.

So, if it has a good GPS-tagging implementation, it would be something I can get to replace my Sony HX100v (which has a poor GPS implementation -- GPS has to lock anew every time you turn on the camera -- so it's useless for quick travel shots).

Plus it has a larger sensor, so hopefully there will be less of a watercolor effect at larger magnifications.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 13, 2011 at 19:17 UTC

I hope it has usable GPS tagging.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 5, 2011 at 22:23 UTC as 47th comment
On Canon launches PowerShot SX40 HS 35x CMOS superzoom news story (158 comments in total)
In reply to:

Macist: Without GPS, this does not even merit a second look.

Super-zooms are cameras for travel. Nowadays, virtually every photo software and storage site incorporates GPS functionality, so that the user can find out exactly where the photo was taken.

So, without GPS, this super-zoom fails as a travel camera.

Too bad.

cont.

GPS has changed all this. Now I can plot my shots on Google Earth, or on any of the other map services offered by virtually all of the major photo sites.

For instance, I went through Micronesia over Christmas. Canoeing around small islands the names of which I never knew, I took a ton of shots of locations that I would never know how to find on a map. Same for meandering around islands and going through villages the names of which were then unknown to me.

With the photos tagged with GPS coordinates, I can zoom in on the exact location in Google Earth, and actually find out where I've been :)

As to the phone thing, it is absurd to think that I would try to tag 2000 with it, and then enter the coordinates manually into LightRoom.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 30, 2011 at 18:24 UTC
On Canon launches PowerShot SX40 HS 35x CMOS superzoom news story (158 comments in total)
In reply to:

Macist: Without GPS, this does not even merit a second look.

Super-zooms are cameras for travel. Nowadays, virtually every photo software and storage site incorporates GPS functionality, so that the user can find out exactly where the photo was taken.

So, without GPS, this super-zoom fails as a travel camera.

Too bad.

No offense, based on your responses, I would guess that (1) you have never used a camera with a good GPS when traveling, and (2) that you do not travel much.

For me GPS has been a revelation: I do several trips a year, virtually all to multiple locations. Before GPS, I'd come back with a couple of thousand photos and sometimes it would be a while before I get the time to edit them. Many are shots taken while driving or hiking, so the locale is unfamiliar to me. Often I'd be trying to guess where a shot was taken (small islands are the worst :) Even if I remember where a shot was taken, often I remember the name of the location (or never knew the name).

Direct link | Posted on Sep 30, 2011 at 18:23 UTC
On Canon launches PowerShot SX40 HS 35x CMOS superzoom news story (158 comments in total)
In reply to:

Macist: Without GPS, this does not even merit a second look.

Super-zooms are cameras for travel. Nowadays, virtually every photo software and storage site incorporates GPS functionality, so that the user can find out exactly where the photo was taken.

So, without GPS, this super-zoom fails as a travel camera.

Too bad.

Well, you either have an amazing memory, or you don't travel much.

Even a two-week long trip can take you through enough similar locations, to make you wonder if this was in city A or City B, village A or village B, or even what country it was.

Then try remembering all this 5 years (and 15 or 20 trips) later.

Again, the main reason I see for getting a super-zoom is to use as a travel camera, where it is often the best compromise between convenience, features and size.

And what does your smartphone has to do with wondering where that rice field photo you are looking at 5 years from now was taken?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 25, 2011 at 22:10 UTC
On Canon launches PowerShot SX40 HS 35x CMOS superzoom news story (158 comments in total)

Without GPS, this does not even merit a second look.

Super-zooms are cameras for travel. Nowadays, virtually every photo software and storage site incorporates GPS functionality, so that the user can find out exactly where the photo was taken.

So, without GPS, this super-zoom fails as a travel camera.

Too bad.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2011 at 20:30 UTC as 19th comment | 6 replies
On Samsung releases WB750 18x compact superzoom news story (18 comments in total)
In reply to:

Macist: Great specs, but nowadays, without GPS, it fails as a travel camera.

"...Might be a fail for you but as a traveller I can't imagine why a GPS in a camera should be a must for me...."
*******
Seriously?!

Because if you go to several regions or countries during the course of a trip, it is often difficult to figure out what shat was taken where.

Once you've experienced a camera with good GPS implementation, it is tough to go back to one without it. Judging by your statement, I bet you never experienced one.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2011 at 20:44 UTC
On Samsung releases WB750 18x compact superzoom news story (18 comments in total)

Great specs, but nowadays, without GPS, it fails as a travel camera.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 1, 2011 at 15:05 UTC as 6th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

jotor: No mention of GPS--a killer for me.

If you travel, you'd know why a GPS is a must.

Superzooms are naturals for travel. GPS is a must.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2011 at 23:20 UTC
Total: 31, showing: 21 – 31
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