DtEW

DtEW

Joined on Feb 17, 2012
About me:

Amateur photographer primarily shooting in adventure and urban exploration contexts.

Comments

Total: 53, showing: 1 – 20
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Don't most of the Sony Xperias have heat issues? I guess it makes perfect sense to do this on a ski slope.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 13, 2016 at 01:29 UTC as 7th comment
On article In Fine Detail: Canon EOS 5DS / 5DS R In-Depth Review (668 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike Sandman: A thorough review, but I question the conclusion. How does a camera that has:
Less dynamic range
Noisier Base ISO images
Poorer low light performance
A low ISO cap
Less JPEG detail
Slower AF tracking
Limited video features
No zebra or peaking options
Slow AF in Live View and video

...get an 83 compared to the 90 for the D810 and a7Rii, unless you count the first series of a7 cameras, which have different but significant shortcomings, as contemporaneous competitors.

Given the possibility (from my perspective) that the omission from your original post might have been deliberate... can you blame me for feeling the need to make a blunt, unmistakable point referencing pure evil?

Your follow-up did show that the blunt point was unnecessary, though.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 19, 2015 at 05:35 UTC
On article In Fine Detail: Canon EOS 5DS / 5DS R In-Depth Review (668 comments in total)
In reply to:

noflashplease: This is the first iteration of the Canon 5D that I would have absolutely no use for. I can see the purpose as a medium format substitute for studio use but even a 6D is a better general use camera. At least it's a niche model and Canon maintains alternatives.

noflashplease:

Pretty sure this will go right over your head, but here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_EOS-1Ds_series

The point is that the "s" variant is the "super resolution" designation relative to the 1D III announced at the same time, which was only 10 mpx. The Nikon competitor was 12 mpx.

So of course there was a high res, landscape/studio-focused 1D body.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 19, 2015 at 02:25 UTC
On article In Fine Detail: Canon EOS 5DS / 5DS R In-Depth Review (668 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike Sandman: A thorough review, but I question the conclusion. How does a camera that has:
Less dynamic range
Noisier Base ISO images
Poorer low light performance
A low ISO cap
Less JPEG detail
Slower AF tracking
Limited video features
No zebra or peaking options
Slow AF in Live View and video

...get an 83 compared to the 90 for the D810 and a7Rii, unless you count the first series of a7 cameras, which have different but significant shortcomings, as contemporaneous competitors.

Because it does it at a finer pixel pitch than any of its contemporaries, and is equipped with features that facilitate production of output that can exceed its contemporaries in the hands of a competent photographer who knows what he's doing, by controlling the input to work with the 5DS/SR's known limitations.

Nice job cherry-picking relative deficiencies and excluding the primary feature that this camera was built to excel at.

By your selective framing Hitler was a neat guy and should be up there with Alexander the Great if you just omitted the Nazi party and the Holocaust.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 19, 2015 at 02:03 UTC
In reply to:

sportyaccordy: Very cool. Just goes to show why despite low DxO ratings Canon still remains at the top of the food chain. They know what photographers at all levels need.

vscd & sportyaccordy: concur wholeheartedly about the EF 40mm f/2.8 STM, esp. with the nearest competitive FF-light-circle compact lens (a 35mm f/2.8) going for ~6 times its price. *shakeshead*

Direct link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 22:23 UTC
In reply to:

Koray: BALL BEARINGS!.. AWESOME.

And I just figured out why there are two sets of ball bearings in a helicoid slot: one to engage/roll on one edge of the slot, and the other to engage/roll on the other edge... and tensioned via the springs so that there is no slop in either direction no matter how the helicoid slot wears.

Built to focus accurately... forever, basically.

Awesome indeed.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 09:27 UTC

It's pretty awesome that some companies actually do seem to try hard to bring you good value for your money, and plan for a long-term relationship with the customer.

It's also great that Roger Cicala can educate and disseminate to the camera-buying-public this sort of insight that is rarely obvious behind all the marketing and ad-copy.

Kudos to Canon and Lensrentals.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 06:08 UTC as 59th comment | 4 replies

I tried to acquire this lens (to replace a Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art), but ended up receiving two consecutive bad copies with optical qualities *far short* of anything that could be considered prime-like, or even that of an excellent zoom. I have posted my findings and aperture series here further down the thread:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3932559

There is also a supplemental post in fredmiranda forums linked within that is a summary of all the FLs.

Granted, it is only a sample size of 2. But I think the community would benefit from 1) seeing what a bad copy looks like, and 2) understand that it is indeed very possible to receive one... or even two.

I also welcome the sharing of results from good copies that may be out there so that people can also see what that looks like.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2015 at 18:36 UTC as 8th comment
In reply to:

Gary Dean Mercer Clark: The red skin tones don't look natural. Using wide angle lenses for portraits doesn't produce the pleasant perspective that normal to telephoto range lenses provide. Can't believe these are the real life examples you chose to represent this lens/camera combination.

Ditto to Preternatural Stuff.

In the realm of a discussion forum/thread, your words and ideas are both your tools and weapons.

Being bullied is defined as being put under unfair threat & coercion by the more-powerful. In the realm of a schoolyard, social and/or physical prowess are the means.

To claim being bullied in a realm purely of words and intellect is to imply that you are outmatched verbally and intellectually, which is the only reason why conducting conflict with you using those means would be unfair. You are calling yourself an imbecile.

Are you being more honest with us than intended? ;)

Direct link | Posted on Nov 7, 2015 at 00:03 UTC
On article 20:20 vision: Hands-on with Sigma's 20mm F1.4 'Art' (146 comments in total)
In reply to:

Valen305: Nice! Can't wait to see how it performs. Especially coma - if any, wide open.

The fact that the Oshimoto photo essay is stopped-down on a crop sensor is seriously scaring me.

http://www.sigma-photo.co.jp/oshimoto_photoessay/2015/img/1022-full-08.jpg

The branches in the background (on the opposite shore of the river) on the far left edge should be within the plane of focus, since you can see in the middle of the frame on the opposite shore the grass/leaf detail in great detail. What I see on this crop-sensor at f/4 is astigmatism and CA. On the edge (not even corner!) of a crop sensor!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 23, 2015 at 20:44 UTC
On article 20:20 vision: Hands-on with Sigma's 20mm F1.4 'Art' (146 comments in total)
In reply to:

sirkhann: Most Nikonians probably think there is no logical reason to choose the Sigma versus 20/1.8G.

And then I promise you - just wait to see the samples from this lens. You can cut your finger o this baby's corners, so sharp!

People who decry the use of a polarizer with UWA focal lengths obviously have never tried it and are speaking out of an orifice other than their mouth.

Sure, a polarizer with UWA focal lengths is just asking for trouble if you shoot involving the sky in landscape orientation.

But they forget that great (aguably, better) UWA compositions can be had involving the sky and the foreground in a portrait orientation, for which a polarizer works just fine. It's the breadth of the included sky that causes polarizer-gradient issues, and you simply don't include a wide span in portrait orientation.

The other thing is that they seem to forget that a polarizer has a functionality in photography other than sky, notably modifying the reflectivity of water and other surfaces (foliage is a common application).

Direct link | Posted on Oct 23, 2015 at 19:01 UTC
On article 20:20 vision: Hands-on with Sigma's 20mm F1.4 'Art' (146 comments in total)

Sure, the bulbous front element can't accept standard threaded filters. That's understandable.

But why make it a fixed hood that sticks out so far that if you want to use square filters (like many/most landscape photogs do), you must go with ≥150mm filters instead of the more-common 100mm filters? Why not short fixed hood, or simply a detachable hood?

I mean, a 100mm filter system can accommodate a 16mm FoV when it mounts to a threaded UWA. If the fixed hood didn't space-out the front element from the filter holder by an entire centimeter-or-two from the first filter, it should easily accommodate a measly 20mm.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 22, 2015 at 23:44 UTC as 29th comment | 3 replies

ISO 4-million? It's useless without 20-stops of Exmor dynamic range!

;)

Direct link | Posted on Jul 30, 2015 at 04:13 UTC as 121st comment | 5 replies
On article New samples from the Sigma 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens (232 comments in total)

Is it just me or does this Sigma 24mm f/1.4 Art fail (way too strong of a word) to significantly surpass the Samyang 24mm f/1.4? Or are my expectations a little unrealistic?

I mean, I've already got the Sigma 24 on-order. It's just a matter of deciding whether I should sell my Samyang 24. AF is not a major consideration for my usage of a 24mm, and in-fact prefer the longer ring throw of a manual lens. But I do appreciate Sigma's generally-better build quality (have their 35 Art).

Decisions, decisions...

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2015 at 20:09 UTC as 7th comment
On article Sony a6000 Review (878 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kakariki: Hi, I am split between the a6000 and the fuji x-t1. The IQ of the a6000 seems to be a bit better with a decent lens but the weather-sealed body of the x-t1 is quite tempting. I want to take my camera on longer hiking trips in any weather conditions - below freezing, in heavy rain and sweet sunshine. I would be certainly careful with using any camera in bad weather conditions but even when you are careful you can't keep your gear 100% dry when your hands are wet or heavy fog precipitates (i try to avoid falling into rivers these days).
Has anybody got some experience with the performance and durability of the a6000 in somewhat rougher conditions?
Any comments much appreciated, thanks!

(continued)

Nevertheless, the care with which I use the Canon system remains the same, as "weather-sealed" is not weather-proofing, and there are lots of testimonials of people destroying their "weather-sealed" cameras with seemingly normal "weather". Therefore I regard "weather-sealing" as not something that expands the performance envelope, but rather just a better insurance policy.

Remember, you don't hear about a lot of the cases in which people who dunk their "weather-sealed" camera in a stream to clean it, only to find that it doesn't work right anymore. The nature of testimonials is that people will more likely post about their enviable successes, and not so much their over-ambitous failures.

I think this approach might benefit your consideration: weather sealing is desireable as an added insurance policy. But it is not the be-all, end-all. Neither is the lack of it.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 9, 2014 at 21:51 UTC
On article Sony a6000 Review (878 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kakariki: Hi, I am split between the a6000 and the fuji x-t1. The IQ of the a6000 seems to be a bit better with a decent lens but the weather-sealed body of the x-t1 is quite tempting. I want to take my camera on longer hiking trips in any weather conditions - below freezing, in heavy rain and sweet sunshine. I would be certainly careful with using any camera in bad weather conditions but even when you are careful you can't keep your gear 100% dry when your hands are wet or heavy fog precipitates (i try to avoid falling into rivers these days).
Has anybody got some experience with the performance and durability of the a6000 in somewhat rougher conditions?
Any comments much appreciated, thanks!

Can't speak to the A6000 (too new, and my usage of this system is different these days*), but I used to use the NEX-5N (an A6000 predecessor) as my primary camera in all conditions except pouring rain (what's to shoot in pouring rain?). This included a canyoneering trip down Tenaya Canyon (dry-bagged the camera when we had to rap into water), lots of shooting in snow/snowing/windblown snow conditions in Tahoe, and lots more urbex (dust, animal fecal matter, industrial waste). The camera survived unscathed, although I was as careful as was reasonable (i.e. wiping down the camera, not rinsing it off).

* - My E-mount system usage has been shifted to casual/social/tourism photography after I invested in a full-frame Canon system. The Canon system is weather-sealed, and it is the primary camera system I use for more adventurous/challenging activities... and those are the photos I might only ever shoot once, so hence maximal IQ.

(continued)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 9, 2014 at 21:50 UTC
On article Sony a6000 Review (878 comments in total)
In reply to:

DPJoe2: I can't find the lock out option to prevent the camera from taking a shot when there is no memory card in the camera. Yes, I am brain dead and old. Yesterday I took about 5 shots of my sister-in-law. Then, last night I went to import them into LR. Surprise, no card in the camera. How dumb. Help!

I just utilize the policy that I don't close the battery/card bay hatch unless I have a card in there.

The policy has a dual effect:

1) It indicates at-a-glance that you don't have a card in the camera.

2) If leaving the hatch open bothers you (it does for me), it incentivizes you to transfer your stuff quickly, and return the card to the bay quickly so that you can close the hatch.

This policy also addresses the brain fart of running out somewhere with the camera without a bag (which is presumably where you might keep an extra card). The electronic lock-out you are seeking will do nothing for you (aside from thwarting you early) when you don't have a card somewhere on you, right?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 8, 2014 at 01:30 UTC
On article Sony a6000 Review (878 comments in total)
In reply to:

mosc: I want an A-mount version of the A6000 with a proper grip, preferably in a $999 package with that 16-50 f2.8 lens of theirs. Who's with me? SLT be damned, just rip it out and let the chip do the work.

@Miwok: it probably doesn't matter in most circumstances, but I would rather have it than not, esp. when OSPDAF has progressed to the point where SLT doesn't offer any particular performance advantage anymore.

Yes, I would think long-and-hard between a dSLR and dSLT for the light loss vs. AF/EVF performance advantages. But it is a short consideration when you can have the same advantage as dSLT without light loss with this newest version of OSPDAF.

As an aside, I don't think one needs to fear the decline of A-mount. You will always need a bigger body for IBIS with sensors of this scale (and bigger), and there are definitely handling advantages to full-sized grips/buttons/levers/etc. Plus there is a more-developed lens catalog, plus the Minolta legacy.

MILCs are the most obvious and flashiest implementation for OSPDAF. But its advantages will go everywhere.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 6, 2014 at 21:19 UTC
On article Sony a6000 Review (878 comments in total)
In reply to:

mosc: I want an A-mount version of the A6000 with a proper grip, preferably in a $999 package with that 16-50 f2.8 lens of theirs. Who's with me? SLT be damned, just rip it out and let the chip do the work.

@tkbslc: No. Not in a way that preserves the functionality of the A6000 OSPDAF.

The LA-EA3 will only enable CDAF.

The LA-EA4 adds its own PDAF, but that necessitates a pellicle mirror, which takes away 1/3-stop of light. Even that isn't quite as fast as the A6000's OSPDAF w/native lenses.

In addition, when you talk about A-mount, it is the norm to have IBIS, as the vast majority of A-mount lenses do not have OSS. Adapting the A6000 to use with A-mount lenses would leave you with a setup that features no image stabilization for just about all lenses.

This is why adding an A-mount body sans SLT, and instead using the A6000 OSPDAF, makes total sense, assuming it is technically possible. The A-mount has more lenses on the long end. The bigger, dSLR-like body enables the incorporation of IBIS and weather-sealing, and a full grip also helps handling those big lenses.

A common use of crop bodies like this is an addition to an existing FF system in lieu of a tele-extender.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 6, 2014 at 19:09 UTC
On article Sony a6000 Review (878 comments in total)
In reply to:

mosc: I want an A-mount version of the A6000 with a proper grip, preferably in a $999 package with that 16-50 f2.8 lens of theirs. Who's with me? SLT be damned, just rip it out and let the chip do the work.

I think with a few tweaks to the tracking algorithm, and an even bigger buffer, such a camera can be a serious contender against the Canon 7D and its upcoming successor.

It could conceivably become the killer app for birders.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 6, 2014 at 18:29 UTC
Total: 53, showing: 1 – 20
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