andersf

andersf

Lives in Sweden Sweden
Joined on Aug 9, 2004

Comments

Total: 15, showing: 1 – 15
On Fujifilm X-T1 First Impressions Review preview (1657 comments in total)
In reply to:

Photographer Jonathan: A really nice camera, BUT, every new camera should have a touch screen, and it should be articulating so you can angle it for portraits not just landscape, and for actual photo shoots, it is a must to have a focus point that can be moved in one step, nice and fast, not two steps, and 8000 shutter would of been nice also, and a higher flash sync speed, and a popup flash, I could keep going if a wanted to, but this camera is really nice, now if Canon would make one the same, with there regular lens mount that takes my ff glass, that would be great, but I might have to buy this new fuji along with the 56 f1.2 lens, and the 35 f1.4,,,,,, I am sick of waiting for Canon, and Nikon slightly missed the boat with the DF, it should've been more like this fuji Xt1, ( real digital fusion ) with electronic view finder, focus peaking, video, touch flip screen, 4 years in the making so they could leave out all the new technology, doesn't make sense, go Fuji, kick Nikon and Canon's ass

What happens to a touch screen phone when you press the phone tightly against your cheek to answer? :D

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2014 at 13:38 UTC
On Canon Korea teases new camera, EOS M2 or SL1/100D? article (259 comments in total)

so someone is doing "photoshop forensics" under the assumption that the person making the veiled marketing image would use an image of the new product underneath? Wouldn't you just pick any random body and make the image from that? The whole point is to reveal that it's a canon slr body and nothing more. An image of any canon slr body will do.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 9, 2013 at 20:27 UTC as 104th comment | 1 reply

Still confused about the various lens mounts. If we disregard anything needing an adapter, how many lenses with full image circle do these cameras have available at launch? How many more are announced? I'm surprised they haven't launched it with a pancake 40mm or so, which would have really shown its compactness and offered a cheap kit.

Most importantly, what is the track record of 3rd party manufacturers for providing Sony lenses? I assume that because of the different registration distance, it's not as simple as providing a different mount if e.g. sigma wants to make a 35/1.4 or 25-105/4 for these bodies?

This is what it all comes down to in the end, how fast will we have a broad lineup of good quality lenses at competitive prices (meaning competition required)?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 16, 2013 at 08:04 UTC as 46th comment
On Can computer corrections make simple lenses look good? article (162 comments in total)
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: Interesting.

I wonder how it performs if it is applied to a rather good lens, like an average zoom kit lens?

You just need a psf per aperture and focal length and I believe it could be done with the same algorithms as in the paper.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 30, 2013 at 21:06 UTC
In reply to:

alistairhenning: If the image quality is up to the standard of the previous DP Merrills, this will be a great camera for professionals who need this focal length.

Usability has really improved since the original DP1. I've owned a few DP models over the years, and the DP2 Merrill is the first whose handling and overall responsiveness feels competitive with other brands' recent efforts.

In terms of per-pixel sharpness, the DP Merrills beat any APS-C sensor cameras out there, regardless of price or size.

As for the cost of buying three Merrills? Consider the cost of owning a Fuji X-E1 or X-Pro1 with the three available primes (which happen to be approximately the same effective focal lengths); it's the same, or actually slightly more, in cost plus you're still left with just one camera body.

No, you will have gone through 2-3 bodies in 10 years, to go with those 3 primes. The last couple of years you use them on a body 2 generations better than the current. By that time the three DP bodies look antique.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2013 at 23:07 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (315 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pythagoras: how is this better than picasa? free software integrated with my email and websharing that has allowed metadata (tags) for years. as well as multiple organizing options and simple editing tools.
this is a real question. i haven't used lightroom, and i want someone to explain to me why i should use lightroom instead of picasa.

I believe no canon dSLR has had raw in the auto modes. Have used 350D, 600D and 60D.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 16:33 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (315 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pythagoras: how is this better than picasa? free software integrated with my email and websharing that has allowed metadata (tags) for years. as well as multiple organizing options and simple editing tools.
this is a real question. i haven't used lightroom, and i want someone to explain to me why i should use lightroom instead of picasa.

Agreed, a bit inflammatory. But: if you don't have time to do Raw editing and let the jpeg engine do its job (often better than a quick manual conversion), I still recommend even beginners to shoot Raw+jpeg, whether you touch the Raws later or not. Cards are so cheap these days that it is a non issue. When you get that shot of a lifetime and realize you exposed it two stops wrong, having that raw file is invaluable. That said, if you have this raw+jpeg workflow you can get away with Picasa + any raw converter for the shots that need editing. Bottom line: what I meant was that it is fine to not convert your raw-files, but DO shoot them! For canon at least this means moving past the full auto mode, though.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 13:34 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (315 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pythagoras: how is this better than picasa? free software integrated with my email and websharing that has allowed metadata (tags) for years. as well as multiple organizing options and simple editing tools.
this is a real question. i haven't used lightroom, and i want someone to explain to me why i should use lightroom instead of picasa.

Picasa doesn't do Raw. It appears as though it does, but it really doesn't. Until it does that, it can't really compete with LR/Aperture and similar tools. If you shoot 100% jpgs then you either have a P&S camera (nothing wrong with that but you aren't going to many dollars on software, before you spend on a more expensive camera), or you own a mirrorless/dSLR camera that can shoot Raw, but you don't. And there just aren't any excuses for that.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 12:58 UTC
On Nikon announces D600 24MP enthusiast full-frame DSLR article (235 comments in total)

how does the sensor compare to the 5D II? If it "only" has the dynamic range and noise properties of the 5D II then canon already has a similar (cheaper) model. If, however, this is essentially a 5D III-generation sensor then canon quickly needs to make 6D to match Nikon in this segment.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 14, 2012 at 15:24 UTC as 20th comment
On Lightroom 4 Review article (480 comments in total)
In reply to:

gnewsch: Does it also do distortion correction natively, or do you still have to resort to plugins like PTlens etc?

Lens profile corrections (with a large library of lense profiles) has been available in LR since Version 2 I believe. It corrects distortion and vignetting, I'm unsure if it also tries to correct CA but I'd think so.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 6, 2012 at 08:53 UTC

Did I miss something? "Excellent response"? The response actually just confirms her suspicion?

The photographer does 20 weddings (that is 20 days at the most, in other words not a full time job by a long stretch, rather a side income as a semi-pro enjoying a hobby), and then goes on to motivate the cost with *living expenses*? I understand the reasoning behind the costs of gear/software, transportation to/from the shoots and so on. But living costs?

If I just made one wedding per year, I could motivate a price of $50k then, using the same logic?

That said, I don't care if a photographer wants to charge $3k or $10k, I'm free to choose not to hire them, and I'm sure there are cheaper options. But I'd prefer motivation to be an honest "because I can", or "because I don't want to work more than 20 days per year"...

Direct link | Posted on Jan 27, 2012 at 13:10 UTC as 195th comment | 1 reply
On Preview: Canon PowerShot G1 X large sensor zoom compact article (791 comments in total)

Looks awesome. What I don't understand is why they decided on a 4:3 sensor? 3:2 or even 16:9 would have made more sense.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2012 at 14:04 UTC as 265th comment | 12 replies
On Adobe announces Photoshop Elements 10 article (24 comments in total)
In reply to:

andersf: If both elements and Lightroom are organizers/editors and handle RAW images, what sets LR apart as a pro application (and motivates the price difference)? Is there a substantial difference in operation between elements and lightroom? Is there a feature matrix somewhere so one can compare LR3 with Elements 10?

George: I know and use LR, but I have long been looking for a simpler alternative. Only requirements: "real" raw processing, non destructive editing, and good/simple organizer for the amateur dslr shooter on a budget. No "selection" editing or other bitmap based tools required other than simple red-eye removal or simple sharpening brushes. So what I need is an iPhoto clone, and I'm surprised that the giants don't produce one (Microsoft, Adobe, Google don't have an option). Picasa ticks all the boxes but does not do raw (only a dumb conversion from raw to 8 bit, then works non-destructively on the 8bit image, which is stupid!). Iphoto on the other hand appears to be simple, non destructive and keep all the bits of the raw image so I can correct a 1-2 stop overexposure later on, which is all I want. But iPhoto is mac only!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 20, 2011 at 20:19 UTC
On Adobe announces Photoshop Elements 10 article (24 comments in total)
In reply to:

andersf: If both elements and Lightroom are organizers/editors and handle RAW images, what sets LR apart as a pro application (and motivates the price difference)? Is there a substantial difference in operation between elements and lightroom? Is there a feature matrix somewhere so one can compare LR3 with Elements 10?

I thought non-destructive editing was par for the course (and really the only way to do it since editing a raw image makes no sense for the most part). Importing to jpg and editing that (picasa) can't be what PSE10 does can it? Presets/multiple editing also feels like a glaring omission even for an amateur tool, or perhaps especially for an amateur tool. I have been looking for an easy alternative to iPhoto for windows, but still found nothing (I.e. easy organizer, decent raw processing). I'll try the evaluation.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 20, 2011 at 11:33 UTC
On Adobe announces Photoshop Elements 10 article (24 comments in total)

If both elements and Lightroom are organizers/editors and handle RAW images, what sets LR apart as a pro application (and motivates the price difference)? Is there a substantial difference in operation between elements and lightroom? Is there a feature matrix somewhere so one can compare LR3 with Elements 10?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 20, 2011 at 10:21 UTC as 9th comment | 10 replies
Total: 15, showing: 1 – 15