Dotes

Dotes

Joined on Apr 19, 2012

Comments

Total: 18, showing: 1 – 18
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III First Impressions Review preview (2979 comments in total)

I wish this had prefocus.
*sigh*

Direct link | Posted on May 16, 2014 at 17:03 UTC as 594th comment
On Red Giant offers subscription to video editing tools article (26 comments in total)
In reply to:

jorg14: I think Adobe is the bellwether. If they succeed, it will open the floodgates and all companies will be asking for a subscription. It's basically apartment renting and car leasing on a smaller scale. Good for business and bad for the consumer.

Good point.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 18, 2014 at 12:45 UTC
On Red Giant offers subscription to video editing tools article (26 comments in total)
In reply to:

jorg14: I think Adobe is the bellwether. If they succeed, it will open the floodgates and all companies will be asking for a subscription. It's basically apartment renting and car leasing on a smaller scale. Good for business and bad for the consumer.

I disagree.
I am shooting narrative as a hobby. I need access to high end video tools 2 months in the year. If I had to by Adobe Production Premium this would set me back ten times the sum I pay for subscription and I would be stuck with the version I've purchased.

Bootom line, good for the consumer in my book.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 18, 2014 at 09:58 UTC

Who do I need to bribe for a 38mm eqv. GR?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 22, 2013 at 11:37 UTC as 27th comment | 1 reply

The Zeiss has a distance scale (can't see it in the picture?). Aaand suddenly I am interested.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 27, 2013 at 09:25 UTC as 27th comment
On Fujifilm X100S Review preview (476 comments in total)
In reply to:

aris14: Ι find it extremely difficult to see the use of these cams anyway...
All these about street photography which needs some peculiar cams is IMO rather a philology.
Street photography as a term/art does not need a certain cam with certain abilities or whatsoever, just something handy and reliable, top IQ is not its main quest.
The only positive thing in these cams is that they explore miniaturization.

@IchiroCameraGuy:

I don't think you truly understand the problem. You don't have 5 seconds to pre-focus when out on the streets. Distance calibation should be possible to accomplish in a moment, whenever I want, preferably without the need to raise the camera to my face.

Besides, there is not always an object available around you at the required distance so that you use it to AF/manual prefocus. So, on top of raising the camera to eye level, you need to move around to get something in this distance. No, thanks. I'll just stick to manual focus lenses with scales.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2013 at 09:03 UTC
On 5 Reasons why I haven't used my DSLR for months article (591 comments in total)

Welcome to the club.
I don't even own a DSLR anymore.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2013 at 23:33 UTC as 172nd comment | 2 replies
On Fujifilm X100S Review preview (476 comments in total)
In reply to:

aris14: Ι find it extremely difficult to see the use of these cams anyway...
All these about street photography which needs some peculiar cams is IMO rather a philology.
Street photography as a term/art does not need a certain cam with certain abilities or whatsoever, just something handy and reliable, top IQ is not its main quest.
The only positive thing in these cams is that they explore miniaturization.

Take the Sony NEX series as an example. There are NO distance scales on the E-mount lenses, not even on the Zeiss e-mount lenses. And there is NO electronic distance scale in software (Fuji's do have one). This means you can't set focus to a predetermined distance, a feature which is needed for shooting without looking at the screen or through the viewfinder, i. e. for waist or hip shooting. Manual focus is not the same as distance pre-focus. Manual focus can't help you if you are not looking thorugh the viewfinder/screen.

The only way to use a NEX camera as a zone focus camera is to use adapted lenses with distance scales on them.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2013 at 23:30 UTC
On Fujifilm X100S Review preview (476 comments in total)
In reply to:

aris14: Ι find it extremely difficult to see the use of these cams anyway...
All these about street photography which needs some peculiar cams is IMO rather a philology.
Street photography as a term/art does not need a certain cam with certain abilities or whatsoever, just something handy and reliable, top IQ is not its main quest.
The only positive thing in these cams is that they explore miniaturization.

Cameras actually DO need certain features for optimal street. Prefocus abilities, auto low limits for shutter speeds, bigger than the frame viewfinders, etc. Many street photographers find one or more of these mandatory for their process. You will be surprised how many otherwise excellent and ergonomic cameras can't be prefocused which makes them useless for hip or waist level shooting.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2013 at 10:39 UTC
In reply to:

Alejandro del Pielago: ... One of the longest and most boring and most snobbish advertising about Fuji and Ricoh cameras...

Might have something to do with Fuji and Ricoh cameras actually being suited for street shooting.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 25, 2013 at 16:11 UTC

Wish there was a 35mm eq. Ricoh GR.
*sigh*

Direct link | Posted on Jul 25, 2013 at 13:15 UTC as 26th comment
On Just Posted: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 review article (306 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dotes: Andrew certainly meant tonal precision and NOT tonal range here: "This can be used to extract maximum dynamic range at the time of recording, at the expense of tonal range."

It is about time reviews start MEASURING the rolling shutter effect and not just demonstrating it. It is not even hard to measure. Also, I fail to see how a clean and almost moire free camera like the d7100 has worse image quality compared to the gh3.

Hello Andrew, nice to have you here.
Here is another moire test of the gh3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3VAfRO0yIic&feature=youtu.be

I am sure the gh3 is a much more video oriented camera (I actually used one last month for a shoot). It is a true hybrid. But we are discussing image quality here, not features. For me, moire is the most distracting video image element. It might be ok in a still image, but completeley draws attention to itself in a moving image and destroys shots. Neither rolling shutter, nor "electronic" noise, nor low DR, nor FPN ruin shots in the way moire ruins them.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 16, 2013 at 12:26 UTC
On Just Posted: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 review article (306 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dotes: Andrew certainly meant tonal precision and NOT tonal range here: "This can be used to extract maximum dynamic range at the time of recording, at the expense of tonal range."

It is about time reviews start MEASURING the rolling shutter effect and not just demonstrating it. It is not even hard to measure. Also, I fail to see how a clean and almost moire free camera like the d7100 has worse image quality compared to the gh3.

I don't think you know what you are talking about. I cherry picked a moire test video because we are discussing moire. If we were discussing porn I would cherry pick a porn video for you, geez.

Moire occurs in situations involving fine-line and human made structures, which incidentally are all around us. If you did have any idea about what we were talking about you would know that moire and aliasing artefacts are the single most annoying and (hard to fix in post) problem for low budget/indie filmmakers.

Neither the Nikons d5200 and d7100, nor the Canon 5d Mark 3 exhibit aliasing artefacts comparable to this moire-fest.

Being a property of the unifrom sequency sampling it is actually possible theoretically to fully remove this if your OLPF and downsampling are optimized for the sampling rate of your camera.

And finally, learn to do a proper argument. Your posts are full of fallacies.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 16, 2013 at 12:10 UTC
On Just Posted: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 review article (306 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dotes: Andrew certainly meant tonal precision and NOT tonal range here: "This can be used to extract maximum dynamic range at the time of recording, at the expense of tonal range."

It is about time reviews start MEASURING the rolling shutter effect and not just demonstrating it. It is not even hard to measure. Also, I fail to see how a clean and almost moire free camera like the d7100 has worse image quality compared to the gh3.

Seems pretty moire ridden to me...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcbNJUDMEPY

Direct link | Posted on Apr 16, 2013 at 11:47 UTC
On Just Posted: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 review article (306 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dotes: Andrew certainly meant tonal precision and NOT tonal range here: "This can be used to extract maximum dynamic range at the time of recording, at the expense of tonal range."

It is about time reviews start MEASURING the rolling shutter effect and not just demonstrating it. It is not even hard to measure. Also, I fail to see how a clean and almost moire free camera like the d7100 has worse image quality compared to the gh3.

Well, it is not much use having a better codec when your video is moire ridden.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 16, 2013 at 11:15 UTC
On Just Posted: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 review article (306 comments in total)

Andrew certainly meant tonal precision and NOT tonal range here: "This can be used to extract maximum dynamic range at the time of recording, at the expense of tonal range."

It is about time reviews start MEASURING the rolling shutter effect and not just demonstrating it. It is not even hard to measure. Also, I fail to see how a clean and almost moire free camera like the d7100 has worse image quality compared to the gh3.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 16, 2013 at 09:28 UTC as 45th comment | 10 replies
On Blackmagic Designs announces Blackmagic Cinema Camera article (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

Francis Carver: Great new digi-box, BUT for these few minor issues:

1. Crop factor is anywhere from 2.5x to 3.0x, depending whom you ask. it is major, however. Blackmagic Design had mysteriously "forgot" to mention anything about it in their detailed press release or in the posted specs.

2. You would need native Super 16mm film optics or maybe 1-inch C-mount lenses on it. Then you would need some PL and C-mount adapters to make them fit. Full-frame 135 and even DX sensor lenses would be a serious mis-match.

3. Small chance of being able to record fisheye, UWA, and WA perspective image sequences with this Blackmagic camera, due to the above mentioned lens mis-match issue. Crops, barrrels, etc. They should have announced some dedicated lenses for it as well.

4. You cannot change the battery in this thing. The battery inside the camera is sealed. After you shoot for 75-90 minutes with it, you need to plug camera into the AC adapter for 2 hours, according to the BMD specs. Not too good, is it?

The crop factor is definitely 2.3x.
For video horizontal crop factor is the only thing that makes sense.
Check this article (the last part), for example:
http://www.shutterangle.com/2012/cinematic-look-aspect-ratio-sensor-size-depth-of-field/

Direct link | Posted on Apr 19, 2012 at 13:06 UTC
On Blackmagic Designs announces Blackmagic Cinema Camera article (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

RRJackson: A few things worth mentioning about this. The active sensor size is 15.6mm x 8.8mm. That's a very nice size for shooting moving images.

16mm is 10.26mm x 7.49mm. Super-16 is 12.52mm x 7.41mm. A lot of big-budget films have been shot on 16mm. 'Black Swan' was shot on Super-16 and was nominated for an Academy Award for its cinematography.

It's also not *that* much smaller than 35mm Techniscope, which was the 35mm 2-perf format that Sergio Leone used to use all the time. George Lucas also used Techniscope for 'THX-1138.' At 22mm x 9.47mm it's a little bigger than the Blackmagic, but not all that much.

The point about the EF mount limiting the use of wide-angle lenses is well taken, but wide angle lenses typically involve distortion and in a moving image distortion grabs your eye and won't let go. A little distortion that won't be all that noticeable in a still will cause people and objects to visibly warp and bend as they cross the field of view in motion picture footage.

This discussion is kind of pointless.
2-perf is obviously more suited for 2.39:1 than Super16.
Of course, anyone can shoot any ratio these days with any medium. Digital crop comes for free, after all.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 19, 2012 at 13:03 UTC
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