Hubertus Bigend

Hubertus Bigend

Joined on Sep 13, 2011

Comments

Total: 101, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Artistico: I find this slightly amusing, for what's ethical and sustainable about being a camera business these days? Not much considering that all cameras have - in effect - become disposable cameras, most of which will only be used for a few years before being thrown away. Like most other things it's become a consumable rather than something built to last "forever". Building things to last is bad economy as it doesn't create the imaginary growth of money that people seem to want despite the fact that it is eating its way through finite resources at an alarming pace.

I suppose making a limited collector's edition camera is the only way to keep people from disposing of their cameras. A bit like buying a small patch of the rainforest to prevent it from being cut down... Except the resources going into making the limited edition will never be used for or recycled into something more useful.

On one hand you're right, on the other hand many cameras which become obsolete for their owner will be sold to and re-used by someone else. In contrast to only a couple of years ago, virtually all of today's cameras have reached a quality level many people will be content with for many years to come.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 27, 2014 at 10:15 UTC

Funny that there's only one compact camera I can buy today which would have all these features my Olympus C-70 Zoom had ten years ago: pocketable size, (at least a simple optical) viewfinder, (at least) 1/1.8" sensor, zoom up to (at least) 190 mm: the Panasonic LF1 (or Leica C Typ 112).

Unfortunately, the LF1 doesn't have a tiltable display, which is something I'd really like to see in such a camera, today, even if the C-70 didn't have one, either.

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By the way, on smaller screens, be it a tablet or a smaller laptop, it is a complete nuisance to read these picture story style articles! Why not put everything on one page, like in a normal text and like everyone else does? At least optionally? Bandwidth can't possibly be the reason, given the amount of imagery used everywhere else on this site.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 20, 2014 at 08:17 UTC as 20th comment
On Photokina 2014: Olympus stand report article (75 comments in total)
In reply to:

duckling: Next time you visit an exhibition put a polarizer in your pocket. It might help with them reflections.

That's what I tell myself everytime I visit Photokina, and so I did again this time ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Sep 18, 2014 at 10:00 UTC
In reply to:

ManuelVilardeMacedo: You nay-sayers are tiresome. Want 4K? Buy a dedicated video camera, or the Panasonic GH4. Olympus makes photographic cameras with video as an afterthought to satisfy people who want to make a clip every now and then. And rightly so.
Besides, what part of "photography" did you miss in "Digital PHOTOGRAPHY Review?"

By the way, Olympus makes excellent portable digital audio recorders which can be used alongside a camera.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 15, 2014 at 15:11 UTC
In reply to:

ManuelVilardeMacedo: You nay-sayers are tiresome. Want 4K? Buy a dedicated video camera, or the Panasonic GH4. Olympus makes photographic cameras with video as an afterthought to satisfy people who want to make a clip every now and then. And rightly so.
Besides, what part of "photography" did you miss in "Digital PHOTOGRAPHY Review?"

Not to be "aimed" at something doesn't make _unnecessarily_ leaving basic options out any better. And "aimed" or not, there _is_ an avid group of hand-held-shooting videographers who specifically like the E-M5 and E-M1 for their image quality and, most notably, extremely effective in-body stabilization which works with any lens including legacy lenses of all kinds. Not to offer 24/25/50 fps means deliberately denying European videographers the ability to use the existing potential of the camera.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 15, 2014 at 12:32 UTC
On Week in review: 8 things we learned article (48 comments in total)

Problem with Leica is, they have only one really interesting camera, and that's the Leica S, which is even more expensive than the rest of their offerings and only a case for a very small group of people, and it's not really new, either. If a new Leica S with updated sensor came out (I'm thinking in the lines of the new Sony 50 MP medium format sensor here), that would probably be something different.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 31, 2014 at 07:40 UTC as 7th comment
In reply to:

Peiasdf: Wow, for the price of these adapter, might as well pick up an extra Rebel SL1 when you want to shoot Canon lenses.

Yes, but carrying and using a set of lenses with a Micro Four Thirds camera while simply needing an adapter for some of them is much less of a nuisance than carrying und using those lenses with a Micro Four Thirds camera and having to carry another Canon camera, too, for using some of them.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 29, 2014 at 21:45 UTC

"For now, autofocus is listed as unsupported" – does that mean there are hints that autofocus may be supported in the future?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 29, 2014 at 21:40 UTC as 12th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Easycass: Small issue for some maybe, no Fuji X-Trans RAW support, as far as I can tell...

PSP never was the tool of choice for a RAW converter, anyway. Before I'd use PSP to develop my RAWs I'd use what came with the camera to produce an intermediate TIFF for further processing in PSP, for those cases the RAW converter itself wouldn't suffice.

(BTW, isn't Silkypix what comes with current Fuji cameras? I'm shooting Olympus and Sony cameras and contrary to the general public opinion I'm quite happy with Silkypix Pro 5 and 6, which I've actually and voluntarily bought ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 29, 2014 at 10:57 UTC
On Olympus PEN E-PL7 First Impressions Review preview (442 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sergey Borachev: There is little need for this model. Same IQ as all other current models. Only about $50 cheaper than the E-M10 which has a nice EVF. Even if its price should fall more and the difference becomes $100, the EVF alone make the E-M10 more worthwhile. Having to mount and dismount an EVF and the flash in this E-PL7 (which means you can only use one of these accessories) is a clear disadvantage in comparison. I suppose there will always be those who love selfies and who would buy this, even though the E-M10 is so much better.

For some, while clearly not for me, either, the E-PL7 being significantly more compact than the E-M10 may be a much more important feature than having a viewfinder. Personally, I'd wish Olympus would try harder to include a viewfinder in their "rangefinder-style" mirrorless cameras, like Panasonic and even Sony with their larger sensor managed to.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 28, 2014 at 08:39 UTC
On Olympus PEN E-PL7 First Impressions Review preview (442 comments in total)

Ok, the one Olympus camera that fits virtually all my needs is the E-M1, and that's what I'll be buying in the foreseeable future. No other MFT camera yet came as close to my highly regarded E-30 for me as to consider buying it, not even the E-M5 or E-M10 or the Panasonic GH3/4 or the GX7, the latter of which I nonetheless find very appealing, it's just that I either need more and faster and better native lenses in the long telephoto range - or, alternatively, the FT compatibility so far only the E-M1 offers.

Nonetheless, with the E-M1 now being on my path, I still keep looking what else there is, as l might very well consider buying a PEN as a second body some time. But would I want a camera without a built-in viewfinder even as a second body? Never!

Furthermore, I ask myself whether Olympus will someday offer a compact, PEN-like body with the PDAF-capable E-M1 sensor, so that I could use my FT lenses on the second body, too, because that' what I'll be using for some time to come.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 28, 2014 at 07:05 UTC as 104th comment
In reply to:

aandeg: Why does the panasonic have so much noise? The A7s raw at iso 3200 looks like the Gh4 at iso 400.

What I see is A7S at ISO 3200 equals GH4 at ISO 800, regarding noise. And that's exactly what is to be expected, since the A7S sensor is four times as large as the GH4 sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 19:04 UTC

These tests are no good. Comparing GH4 and E-M1 in the start-up view, the GH4 image is sharp, whereas the E-M1 image looks extremely blurred. Looking at other parts of the scene (the 20 Schilling bank note), though, the E-M1 is actually slightly sharper than the GH4. Something clearly must have gone wrong here.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 18:59 UTC as 92nd comment | 1 reply
On Ricoh announces Pentax XG-1 superzoom article (195 comments in total)
In reply to:

JamesD28: I think far too many people are forgetting that this camera's aimed at beginners.
Yes, the sensor is tiny.
Yes, the viewfinder is under par in terms of resolution.
No, the pictures aren't going to be brilliant above ISO 400.

But are beginners really going to care about this?

@Andy Crowe: (1) Yes, but does it? (2) Even if it does, there still is the question why they don't use a slightly larger sensor (it wouldn't even need to be a full 1") and a slightly shorter zoom range (rather than 52x which noone, let alone the beginner, can make sensible use of anyway) to make the difference in image quality and the money spent worthwhile.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 15, 2014 at 14:36 UTC
On Ricoh announces Pentax XG-1 superzoom article (195 comments in total)
In reply to:

JamesD28: I think far too many people are forgetting that this camera's aimed at beginners.
Yes, the sensor is tiny.
Yes, the viewfinder is under par in terms of resolution.
No, the pictures aren't going to be brilliant above ISO 400.

But are beginners really going to care about this?

Compared to 1/2.33", better sensors are inclined to produce visibly better images under almost all imaginable circumstances, completely regardless of whether someone knows what they're doing or not. Trying to sell beginners an extreme and hardly handleable zoom range plus bad image quality instead of a sensible zoom range with at least acceptable image quality is nothing but bogus. Why should beginners have to start with a crappy camera just to find out later what they could have known (or could have been told) right from the start?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 15, 2014 at 10:59 UTC
On Ricoh announces Pentax XG-1 superzoom article (195 comments in total)
In reply to:

JamesD28: I think far too many people are forgetting that this camera's aimed at beginners.
Yes, the sensor is tiny.
Yes, the viewfinder is under par in terms of resolution.
No, the pictures aren't going to be brilliant above ISO 400.

But are beginners really going to care about this?

But do beginners really need bad cameras? Most beginners would profit from a camera design that would have traded some of the extreme zoom range for better overall image quality, too, even if they might not know enough yet to care.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 15, 2014 at 09:23 UTC
On Ricoh announces Pentax XG-1 superzoom article (195 comments in total)

With all the effort they put into making such a camera (which I find nicely designed, by the way), I wish they'd strive more to find a more useful balance between versatility (i.e. zoom range) and compactness on one hand and image quality and low-light capability on the other, until by some miracle someone invents a 1/2.33" sensor with acceptable image quality some day. With a slightly larger sensor and a slightly smaller zoom range I might even become interested in a camera like that XG-1. As things are, I'd rather use this older camera that was named XG-1, too: http://www.rokkorfiles.com/photos/XG-1-image.jpg (via http://www.rokkorfiles.com/XG%20Series.htm).

Direct link | Posted on Jul 15, 2014 at 07:01 UTC as 46th comment | 1 reply
On Nikon 1 V3 First Impressions Review preview (432 comments in total)

Modular or not, I really cannot see how a camera that can only be used with EITHER a viewfinder OR a decent flash "would appeal to enthusiasts". I will never understand why every manufacturer in the world seems to feel obliged to copy that incredibly stupid idea from whoever it was who originally devised it (Ricoh?).

Direct link | Posted on Jun 30, 2014 at 17:14 UTC as 135th comment
On Sony a6000 Review preview (740 comments in total)
In reply to:

Hubertus Bigend: I wonder how a smallish EVF with 462 x 346 effective RGB pixels can be "respectable" for a camera that offers 24 MP, let alone so many years after the first mirrorless camera has appeared on the market. Even the best EVF available today still lacks the clear image of a good optical SLR finder that allows precise manual focus without the nuisance of having to switch into a zoom-in mode. But an EVF like the current Olympus finder and probably the Fuji X-T1 finder, too, is at least a step in the right direction. New electronic finders should improve on that, not deteriorate.

@Scott: I see the point, and the A6000 probably is a capable camera if you don't mind using zoom-in with manual focus. The problem, though, is, that having to zoom in makes it near-impossible to use legacy lenses for snaphots.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 3, 2014 at 11:55 UTC
On Sony a6000 Review preview (740 comments in total)
In reply to:

Hubertus Bigend: I wonder how a smallish EVF with 462 x 346 effective RGB pixels can be "respectable" for a camera that offers 24 MP, let alone so many years after the first mirrorless camera has appeared on the market. Even the best EVF available today still lacks the clear image of a good optical SLR finder that allows precise manual focus without the nuisance of having to switch into a zoom-in mode. But an EVF like the current Olympus finder and probably the Fuji X-T1 finder, too, is at least a step in the right direction. New electronic finders should improve on that, not deteriorate.

@quezra: I've actually used the NEX-7 and NEX-6 EVFs and found them too low-res for my demand. I'm quite sure I don't need to actually use an A6000 to find out that less pixels lead to even lower resolution.

@Zeisschen: Using old manual focus lenses of all kinds is one of the most important application for mirrorless cameras. The worse an EVF is, the less a camera is fun for that purpose, because the more often you need zoom-in to get the focus right. With a good finder, you shouldn't need zoom-in.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 3, 2014 at 11:19 UTC
Total: 101, showing: 1 – 20
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