Revenant

Revenant

Joined on Jul 29, 2011

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Total: 1188, showing: 21 – 40
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On Canon drops prices on 31 high-end L lenses article (58 comments in total)
In reply to:

riveredger: It's funny that some of these lenses are priced higher than motorcycles. I mean, really!?

It tells you something about the cost and complexity involved in making high quality optical equipment. Also, the really expensive lenses are low volume products, which drives up the prices even more.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 13, 2015 at 17:21 UTC
On Olympus Stylus Tough TG-4 to offer Raw capture article (147 comments in total)
In reply to:

KonstantinosK: Wow. One wonders why it took them so many years to offer the obvious. If I was to buy again a camera in this class it would probably be this. Next, Olympus, please make a rugged version of the XZ-2.

"Lens distortion is not an effect of the raw file."

No, but an uncorrected raw file makes it visible. I think that Ocolon's point was that the makers of tough compacts might not want us to see exactly how severe the lens aberrations are.

The fact that Olympus now offers raw capture could mean that the particular lens used in the TG-4 is actually quite good, and the reason for not offering raw in previous models could be that they didn't think that the target market cared about it.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 13, 2015 at 13:50 UTC
On Olympus Stylus Tough TG-4 to offer Raw capture article (147 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike FL: It would be nice to have PASM, TG-5 may be.

OR PS without AM are fine too, but "Aperture Priority"? No kidding?! get real!!!!

OR, get an real Aperture.

I don't think the manufacturers want to advertise the fact that they use ND filters to simulate aperture changes.

Some high-end compacts have an ND filter as a listed feature, but those models change aperture with a diaphragm, and the ND filter is there for other purposes.

Anyway, I can't seem to find another reference at the moment. Most sites, like Imaging Resource, just mention that it's a three-step aperture, but they don't mention how it works.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 13, 2015 at 13:41 UTC
On Olympus Stylus Tough TG-4 to offer Raw capture article (147 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike FL: It would be nice to have PASM, TG-5 may be.

OR PS without AM are fine too, but "Aperture Priority"? No kidding?! get real!!!!

OR, get an real Aperture.

It has been pointed out in various reviews, like this one of the TG-2:

http://www.neocamera.com/camera/olympus/tg2/review

"Since the aperture is simulated by sliding ND filters, it does not affect depth-of-field, only force the use of faster shutter-speeds or lower-ISO which is still useful."

Using ND filters for this purpose is common in compact cameras, and most low-end models (such as Canon ELPH/IXUS) do it that way.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 13, 2015 at 12:38 UTC
On Olympus Stylus Tough TG-4 to offer Raw capture article (147 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike FL: It would be nice to have PASM, TG-5 may be.

OR PS without AM are fine too, but "Aperture Priority"? No kidding?! get real!!!!

OR, get an real Aperture.

An aperture is an opening, and the lens certainly have one. However, there is no diaphragm to change the size of the aperture, so f-stop changes are accomplished with built-in ND-filters, just like in many other compact cameras.

The TG models have a three-step 'aperture': f/2.0, f/2.8 and f/8.0 at wide angle, and f/4.9, f/6.3 and f/18.0 at telephoto.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 13, 2015 at 09:06 UTC
On Samsung NX1 Review preview (1200 comments in total)
In reply to:

ZeneticX: so many people mistaken this as samsung's FIRST DSLR, shows how much they messed up the styling although I won't say it's a bad move, probably offers better ergonomics compared to most mirrorless out there

impressive camera none the less

Even if it was a DSLR, it wouldn't be Samsung's first. They launched their GX series of DSLRs already in 2006.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 11, 2015 at 23:02 UTC
In reply to:

StefanW: Of course they can't disclose their roadmap and because of culture aspects and not loosing their face they can't confirm they had done anything wrong in the past and would do it differently if they would start all over again.

Even though I typically expect these kind of political answers that don't say anything I am surprised that most of the answers are even more extreme as they sound like Nikon don't need to do much development in the future because their current products match already everything the customers might demand.

Maybe Nikon meets the customer demand of the Japanese market, but looking at the overall declining sales of Nikon, maybe Nikon should rethink their answers ... actually rather rethink their strategy.

Most of the other manufacturers have official, published lens roadmaps, so why couldn't Nikon disclose theirs?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 11, 2015 at 20:46 UTC
In reply to:

Miki Nemeth: Unfortunately, unlike Sony, Nikon V1 and no other Nikon 1 series cameras are capable of outputting clean HDMI, and they cannot be used with Atomos or any external recorders. I picked the V1 as my very first camera, and I had to learn the sad truth that the Nikon 1 system is practically an abandonned child of Nikon. This made me terribly disappointed with Nikon, and no way I'd buy anything from Nikon again. I kept the V1 and a nice 1Nikkor lens collection, in the hope that eventually Nikon makes at least a half decent Nikon 1 model.
Atomos is terribly important for concert and interview videos to override the 30-minute video recording limitations.

The time limit doesn't apply, as the OP said:

"Atomos is terribly important for concert and interview videos to override the 30-minute video recording limitations."

I only mentioned the time limit to correct the claim that Panasonic cameras don't have a time limit. They do, in the EU.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 11, 2015 at 13:25 UTC
In reply to:

Miki Nemeth: Unfortunately, unlike Sony, Nikon V1 and no other Nikon 1 series cameras are capable of outputting clean HDMI, and they cannot be used with Atomos or any external recorders. I picked the V1 as my very first camera, and I had to learn the sad truth that the Nikon 1 system is practically an abandonned child of Nikon. This made me terribly disappointed with Nikon, and no way I'd buy anything from Nikon again. I kept the V1 and a nice 1Nikkor lens collection, in the hope that eventually Nikon makes at least a half decent Nikon 1 model.
Atomos is terribly important for concert and interview videos to override the 30-minute video recording limitations.

The 30 minute limit is required in the EU to avoid the camera being classified and taxed as a video camera. Cameras intended for the European market always have this limitation, including Panasonic's cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2015 at 22:39 UTC
On Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal article (810 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: Could you define "convergence" as opposed to "Hybrid"please. I fail to see the difference at the moment.

"The FZ1000 and the GH4 both introduced the photo from video mode for Panasonic. That truly is the epitome of a hybrid or converged camera to me."

A true convergence device should offer both the ergonomics and user experience of a stills camera, as well as that of a video camera. The FZ1000 and GH4 are very capable video cameras, but they handle like DSLRs, not like camcorders.
I think it's this ergonomic aspect that DPR is thinking of, when they say that the XC10 is the first true convergence camera.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2015 at 12:49 UTC
On Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal article (810 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dale Baskin: Since there have been a lot of questions/comments about this camera relative to cameras like the FZ1000 we've decided to put together a small addendum to add to the article that may clarify the differences between cameras. (Which is why I'm not hanging out here responding to comments.) I'll post a message as soon as it's up.

I don't know any videographer who thinks that DSLR ergonomics is optimal for shooting video. There is a reason why stills cameras and video cameras/camcorders are designed differently.

The XC10 makes an attempt at offering both types of user experience. If it succeeds, I can't say without using it first.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2015 at 12:35 UTC
On Samsung NX1 Review preview (1200 comments in total)
In reply to:

PerL: As a side note...
Interesting to see that despite over seven years of development the latest most high tech APS-C sensor still can't match the high ISO/low-light sports shooting capability of a FF Nikon D3, introduced in August 2007. (DxO ISO 2303 vs 1363 on the Samsung).

Sensor size have a larger impact on ISO performance than the sensor technology, especially since both sensors are CMOS. I wouldn't expect an APS-C sensor to achieve the same high ISO performance as the D3 sensor anytime soon.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 20:32 UTC
On Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal article (810 comments in total)
In reply to:

Donnie G: What makes the Canon XC10 better or more brilliant than the GH4, A7s, NX1, etc.? Well, instead of building a "me too" version of those other cameras, Canon chose to create the 1st. affordable, purpose built, multi-media device for today's up and coming multi-media professionals. Traditional enthusiasts are not the target audience, although many of the ergonomic and other design elements, such as the clip on viewfinder, will surely find their way into products designed for enthusiasts in the near future. Meanwhile, Canon will sell millions of these new multi-media cameras to those who do see the brilliance and bang for the buck in its design. Great job Canon! Great article DPR! :))

A newspaper journalist I know sometimes uses an old Ricoh GRD III with a much smaller sensor, and the photos are perfectly usable for newspaper print or web use, so a 1" sensor will do just fine.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 8, 2015 at 23:44 UTC
On Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal article (810 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dale Baskin: Since there have been a lot of questions/comments about this camera relative to cameras like the FZ1000 we've decided to put together a small addendum to add to the article that may clarify the differences between cameras. (Which is why I'm not hanging out here responding to comments.) I'll post a message as soon as it's up.

"Those measly "hybrid" cameras which so far provided only the "low-end video capture" definitely can't measure up to this glorious device."

That's your words, not DPR's. No one said that current hybrid cameras aren't capable of high-end video capture. But in terms of ergonomics and body design, they are stills cameras first and foremost, while the XC10 is designed for both stills and video.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 8, 2015 at 23:21 UTC
On Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal article (810 comments in total)
In reply to:

JapanAntoine: It doesn't feel like a significant step toward convergence: it's a video camera with stills capacity.
I am sure most people will agree that it wasn't really designed with still shooting in mind. Or if it was, then it's quite underwhelming on that side.

Still a very interesting video camera, though :-)
Will it win over a GH4, A7s or a 5D? mmm, not sure...

It was designed for people who need to create both photos and video from the same device, and the ergonomics reflects that need.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 8, 2015 at 23:17 UTC
On Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal article (810 comments in total)
In reply to:

Donnie G: What makes the Canon XC10 better or more brilliant than the GH4, A7s, NX1, etc.? Well, instead of building a "me too" version of those other cameras, Canon chose to create the 1st. affordable, purpose built, multi-media device for today's up and coming multi-media professionals. Traditional enthusiasts are not the target audience, although many of the ergonomic and other design elements, such as the clip on viewfinder, will surely find their way into products designed for enthusiasts in the near future. Meanwhile, Canon will sell millions of these new multi-media cameras to those who do see the brilliance and bang for the buck in its design. Great job Canon! Great article DPR! :))

"XC10 is a camcorder, not a "convergence" device - a title far more suitable for cameras like FZ1000, RX10 or LX100."

Except that those cameras have stills camera ergonomics, while the XC10 has ergonomics suitable for both stills and video, which is what DPR is referring to when they talk about 'convergence'.

And about the lack of raw, that's not really necessary when you need to get photos onto a website or into a newspaper as quickly as possible. Many PJs shoot only JPGs.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 8, 2015 at 23:10 UTC
On Nikon 1 J5 offers 20.8MP BSI sensor and revamped look article (152 comments in total)
In reply to:

zodiacfml: Interesting. Finally, a 1inch sensor without the filter as it doesn't need it. FHD video specs are nice too. Price at launch is sensible, selling at a price of a Sony RX100.

This is nothing new. The earlier Nikon 1 models didn't have AA filters either, and practically all small sensor cameras lack an AA filter, because diffraction makes it unnecessary.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 3, 2015 at 20:09 UTC
On Fujifilm X100T Review preview (649 comments in total)
In reply to:

FodgeandDurn: Apologies for putting this here instead of the 'report issues' button wherever that is - the intro says this has a "23mm f/2 lens". This actually got me excited, but unfortunately it is an error. If you've divided 35 x 1.5 to give some 35mm equivalence wouldn't it be 50mm equiv?

If you don't want to get into equivalency, then it's a 23mm lens, and nothing else. That's the physical FL, and it's printed on the lens. A 23mm lens on an APS-C camera will give you the same field of view as a 35mm lens on a FF camera, since the crop factor is 1.5x. The specs for compact cameras usually mention the FF equivalent FL (but not the FF eq. f-number), and that's why the camera is marketed as 35mm.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 25, 2015 at 12:55 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M5 II Review preview (757 comments in total)
In reply to:

thx1138: Why not down sample the 64MP RAWs to 40MP rather than post them at 64MP?

While I can many improvements over the original E-M5, IQ has barely budged and this is my main bugbear with the m4/3 sensors, they seem stuck in a time warp. While I love my E-M5 going forward I'm not sure I'll stay in that ecosystem unless there is a genuine breakthrough on the sensor front soon. But I do love the lenses so hard to give those up.

Also disappointing to see the woeful menu system still in place by Olympus and I guess the manual is still as bad as ever.

"there has been no progress in DR, low ISO shadow noise, high ISO noise since the E-M5 came out."

That's because Sony hasn't really made any significant progress with their Exmor sensors (which is what the E-M5 uses).

Direct link | Posted on Mar 20, 2015 at 09:21 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M5 II Review preview (757 comments in total)
In reply to:

Eugene232: don't understand all buzz about this camera.
I had an EPL5 which has a the same outdated sensor,
IQ is a mediocre

The sensor is not outdated. It's a Sony Exmor sensor, and they basically used the same technology three years ago as they do today. The reason why APS-C and FF sensors offer better IQ is simply because they are larger.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 20, 2015 at 09:17 UTC
Total: 1188, showing: 21 – 40
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