GlobalGuyUSA

GlobalGuyUSA

Lives in United States Los Angeles, United States
Works as a International Trade
Joined on Jun 24, 2007
About me:

My business is marketing international trade, not photography. My hobbies are primarily graphic art and then photography. Take comments with a grain of salt. I'll learn as much from you as I hope to share with others.

Comments

Total: 56, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous123Next ›Last »
On Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lab Test Review preview (197 comments in total)
In reply to:

Daniel Clune: I keep seeing the sigma 150-500 compared to the Tamron. The Sigma 50-500-OS is the better lens. Sigmas 150-500 has ALWAYS been a stinker. I tested 3 of them they were ALL sub par even compared against my first gen 50-500 non OS let alone the newest 50-500 OS. BUT it does cost more so maybe thats why but still.

I feel doubtful, because I personally started that rumor 3 years ago or so on NikonRumors. But I guess anything is possible in that time. I really want them to make it.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 18, 2014 at 05:35 UTC
On In photos: Swimming with jellyfish article (20 comments in total)

These things always remind me of Metroid.

And Mother Brain, haha.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 14, 2014 at 23:33 UTC as 1st comment
In reply to:

BJN: I like and use Peak Design's Camera Clips. I also got several of their leashes and cuffs. I've found that their anchor and clip system isn't reliable - at least not consistently so. Some clips I got refused to securely lock the anchor buttons. Since the same clips and anchors are part of this new product campaign, I'm avoiding this one. And since these new straps are targeted at bigger and heavier camera equipment, I advise being careful if you do decide to use them. Check to make sure the buttons engage fully in the clips.

This could be a manufacturing problem, but the metal spring clip's design seems vulnerable to slight variations in the bend of the latch.

I felt like quite a few of the comments being posted on this page are from competitor products. But I wouldn't question someone with hundreds of posts.

Ive seen guys with 4 posts comment repeatedly about an item, and that left a question. But others have made hundreds of comments here, and we can accept at least their experience, even if its not the norm.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 14, 2014 at 21:24 UTC
In reply to:

Jonathan F/2: Another strap? Why the heck would I want to be walking around with a giant camera hanging off my neck? It just screams rob me when walking in shady neighborhoods.

Jon, you should buy a camera more suitable to your neighborhood if that's what you're worried about. Even the street kids have cellphones these days, so a m3/4 is probably what you're looking for.

Anyway, a bag won't help either. Its not like a dude walking around with a big bag wont arise suspicion. (I guess he isn't allowed to take it out of the bag either). Its the risk one takes in any neighborhood. Sometimes you get robbed.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 14, 2014 at 21:19 UTC
In reply to:

nxtiak: The Glide Strap + C-Loop by Custom SLR is so much better.
http://www.customslr.com/products/glide-strap
They did a Kickstarter for both several years ago.

Have you tried this new one yet..?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 14, 2014 at 21:17 UTC
On Vanguard Heralder 51T Rolling Backpack Review article (21 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bowerbird: When I saw that the bags weighed 4.3kg I did not bother reading the main review. As a travel bag it is a fail. I am currently in Africa and had to travel by Emirates who depending on the frontline staff stick strictly to their ridiculously low 7kg limit. This bag, then only allows for another 2.7kg of camera gear.

My lightweight roller bag that I picked up for $40 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia a couple of years ago has one main pocket which I can squeeze in a 15'' macbook, Canon 7D, 300mm F4, Swarovski ATX95 scope, Nikon V1, 8x40 Leica binoculars and another spare lens and bits and pieces all wrapped in socks and other items of clothing + bubble wrap to stop them clattering around. All up 12kg so sometimes I have to wear the camera body or bins under my coat on check-in.

Clearly this bag would be ideal for someone like me if it wasn't for modern airline cabin baggage limitations. As a field bag those wheels would stick in your back if used as a daypack.

That being said for local use (wedding photographers, etc), it seems like a good solid product. [I've necro-bumped this topic, because for some reason this article is appearing on the front page of DPR & I happen to be looking for this kind of a rolling backpack; though I'd prefer one carry-on size, I could see how for local use the bigger and sturdier kind can be useful in many situations.]

Direct link | Posted on Jul 12, 2014 at 12:00 UTC
On Vanguard Heralder 51T Rolling Backpack Review article (21 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bowerbird: When I saw that the bags weighed 4.3kg I did not bother reading the main review. As a travel bag it is a fail. I am currently in Africa and had to travel by Emirates who depending on the frontline staff stick strictly to their ridiculously low 7kg limit. This bag, then only allows for another 2.7kg of camera gear.

My lightweight roller bag that I picked up for $40 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia a couple of years ago has one main pocket which I can squeeze in a 15'' macbook, Canon 7D, 300mm F4, Swarovski ATX95 scope, Nikon V1, 8x40 Leica binoculars and another spare lens and bits and pieces all wrapped in socks and other items of clothing + bubble wrap to stop them clattering around. All up 12kg so sometimes I have to wear the camera body or bins under my coat on check-in.

Clearly this bag would be ideal for someone like me if it wasn't for modern airline cabin baggage limitations. As a field bag those wheels would stick in your back if used as a daypack.

Dave -- the Review treated it as a Travel bag:

"While it's convenient to have two bags, I find I have to take them both when I travel, which is not ideal. A design that combines the wheels and telescoping handle of the roller with a backpack offering plenty of storage would be a better fit. That's where the Vanguard Heralder 51T rolling backpack ($299.99) comes into play."

Bowerbird's comment makes sense in context. The article even closed with one Con being that its not carry-on size. Obviously, from front to end the Reviewer was considering it for travel.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 12, 2014 at 11:41 UTC
On What is equivalence and why should I care? article (1825 comments in total)

I APPRECIATE you including the f/stop equivalencies.

As photographers, we don't want light, just for the sake of light -- we want it for the sake of a certain "feel" and "effect." Thus, every bit of more information is always helpful.

It doesn't hurt having too much information, it does hurt having none.

Thanks!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2014 at 21:19 UTC as 105th comment
On Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lab Test Review preview (197 comments in total)
In reply to:

tabloid: f5-f6.3
LOL
Make sure you only use it on a sunny day.

You would think that in this day and age of technology they could do a 150-600 @ f2.8

Wheres my Brownie 127

You cant have a lens revolution in terms of size, you can only gather so many photos at a specific front element. I suppose material science could find some alternative to glass that weighs less, but the plastic used for lower lenses is not the solution and anyway the lenses need to be the same size. Unfortunately, light can not be sucked into the lens like a vacuum picks up dust, so there is no way around this. That is why the focus is on sensor technology, not lens technology. The most you can do with lens technology is improve clarity and reduce scattering. Anyway f stops are in principle a kind of ratio or specific amount of light depending how you think of it, so its not like f/2.8 will mean anything else except that ratio for that much light gathering.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 2, 2014 at 08:47 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 First Impressions Review preview (1282 comments in total)
In reply to:

peevee1: DPR wrote: "The first thing you'll notice here is that a) the Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 is noticeably sharper"

Huh? Check out the brick building near the bottom right corner, and a yellow structure near it. There is no question about which one is sharper - of course it is Panasonic. There is not difference in the center, but FZ1000 clearly wins in the corners, at least at wide end.

You're right -- about that lower right hand corner. But as for the rest of the 3/4ths of the image, the Sony is sharper, including the center.

Which makes me wonder about that lower-right hand corner.

Its a bit weird compared to the rest of the image, isn't it.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 1, 2014 at 23:48 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 First Impressions Review preview (1282 comments in total)
In reply to:

RonHendriks: You can also compare it to a Nikon 1 series camera.

The Nikon 1 is directly comparable (a step-down mirrorless to 1", just as these are step-up bridge cameras from even smaller yet sensors). The field is converging. Nikon has a way to go with 4K -- but they are not focused on that. They are focused on AF. The 4K market doesn't even exist. No one has the TVs, fewer yet can work with the files, and its just not pressing in Photography, except for those with an Audio Video emphasis (which isn't Photography, properly). There are an unlimited number of Audio & Video forums on the web. You might want to check those, if Photography isn't of interest to you? They might have better recommendations and comparisons. In this case, if you're looking for 4K you probably want to compare to Audio-Video equipment and specialised Camcorders -- not Cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 1, 2014 at 20:34 UTC
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III Review preview (724 comments in total)

I would like to see FUJI make a rival to this one.

Sony often forgets how users "feel," but Fuji is doing pretty good there.

When you say the Sony is heavy-handed in its processing -- is it able to be reduced through the software (to a degree whereby its not really heavy handed)?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 1, 2014 at 07:49 UTC as 22nd comment
On Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lab Test Review preview (197 comments in total)
In reply to:

RichRMA: Suggestion: We hear mostly that these lenses perform better on FF sensors than crop sensors, but how about a direct comparison? A 24mp DX like the Nikon D7200 versus a 24mp D610. Same shot, same subject, same distance. Then, crop and upsize the D610 shot and see how it matches up.

Hi Misolo,

That's a good point, but I think you have it correct (edges), and the OP had it backwards. Of course, it all depends how important edges are to you. The middle and even far middle is generally pretty good throughout Fullframe lenses these days, even if edges tend to get rotten. And yet, when you're doing tele work, often the center is the important part, and often you want a smaller f/stop (f/16) when you can get it. So FF helps with diffraction for the reasons you mentioned, and you still get the whole sweet spot within Fullframe as well. I guess it pretty much comes down to whether one needs sharp edges for ones work.

But if you look at the APS-C vs. Fullframe tests (on this page), you can see what Westerner is pointing out -- some Fullframe lenses just seem to work better on Fullframe cameras (and I have no idea why). In this case, there is a significant level of difference between FF and APS-C sharpness, in FF's favor. Again, I'm not sure why this is.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 1, 2014 at 06:36 UTC
On Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lab Test Review preview (197 comments in total)
In reply to:

TTMartin: Very informative.

Just like the Tamron the Sigma 150-500 OS performs much better on a full frame sensor.

Guess it is time to give it a try on my 6D.

I'm not sure that one can compare Fullframe and Cropped bodies directly like that in DxO measurements -- they use different standards, and it varies by body as well.

I think you can more directly compare with other lenses on the same body and to a lesser degree in the same format. But to cross bodies and formats is pushing it.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 30, 2014 at 01:18 UTC
On Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lab Test Review preview (197 comments in total)
In reply to:

RichRMA: Suggestion: We hear mostly that these lenses perform better on FF sensors than crop sensors, but how about a direct comparison? A 24mp DX like the Nikon D7200 versus a 24mp D610. Same shot, same subject, same distance. Then, crop and upsize the D610 shot and see how it matches up.

What Misolo saided. The D7100 in full mode will have more resolution than a D800 in crop mode.

So for "sunny" pictures (where the highest ISOs are not needed), and at apertures like f/8, there is really no one who is saying that Fullframe is better. You'll get more out of a cropped camera, if that's what you're looking for (indeed, this is THE key strength of APS-C other than weight and size). The 600mm end will be a true 900mm, whereas the D800 will be throwing away pixels do get that digital zoom.

By contrast, Fullframe is better at wide angle (in general) and getting a narrow depth of field and at low-light.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 30, 2014 at 01:14 UTC
On Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lab Test Review preview (197 comments in total)
In reply to:

Daniel Clune: I keep seeing the sigma 150-500 compared to the Tamron. The Sigma 50-500-OS is the better lens. Sigmas 150-500 has ALWAYS been a stinker. I tested 3 of them they were ALL sub par even compared against my first gen 50-500 non OS let alone the newest 50-500 OS. BUT it does cost more so maybe thats why but still.

Which is really WEIRD isn't it? Why does Sigma -- who is undergoing significant efforts to increase their brand, allow this to stand?

I hope they come out with a simple 2x optical design 300-600/f5.6 that is optically superior to the Tamron and sharp as hell at f/5.6 to replace the 150-500. A 200-600/f5.6 is also acceptable, but honestly, we have so many lenses that go beyond 200mm now that its just not necessary and just adds weight, cost.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 30, 2014 at 01:10 UTC
On Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lab Test Review preview (197 comments in total)
In reply to:

tabloid: f5-f6.3
LOL
Make sure you only use it on a sunny day.

You would think that in this day and age of technology they could do a 150-600 @ f2.8

Wheres my Brownie 127

I would like to see a Sigma 300-600mm OS f/4 or f/5.6 (depending on how the size, weight, price balance out).

Obviously, an f/2.8 is not only completely unrealistic without tens of thousands of dollars -- but I think a shorter zoom range (a simple 2x optical design) and f/5.6 optimized for f/5.6 is possible. I wouldn't want an f/4 that was too expensive.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 30, 2014 at 01:06 UTC
In reply to:

Richard Murdey: I don't feel concept of "early adopter" even holds true with dSLRs. Every new model is always better than the old one. Your only choice, given how the price drops over time, is when to buy it, and the only gamble/risk is whether you are going to be getting a camera that will be replaced with a new model in four years (D700), two years (D800), or just one (D600).

@InTheMist

Production errors vs. Design errors. Against the # of sales, the D800 & D4 did not have significant problems (far less than most consumer electronics), easily resolved with an exchange. The D600 was the only one that had a significant DESIGN flaw, where it did not work as designed. Design flaws are different than production errors, which Canon and Samsung and Sony and Fuji and everyone else suffer from too. 100% of D600s included a shutter with a flawed design, whereas only 1 out of a 100 or more other models have production errors based on tolerances of micrometers (test your gear after you buy it) - very small.

Similarly, the SB900 did not have an overheating problem, it functioned exactly as designed (as intended it shuts down to cool to avoid burning out). What Nikon found is that users didn't like the way that feature functioned, users want it to just slow down as it heats up. So Nikon made a new one that took into consideration when flashes are under stress.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 30, 2014 at 00:25 UTC
In reply to:

Richard Murdey: I don't feel concept of "early adopter" even holds true with dSLRs. Every new model is always better than the old one. Your only choice, given how the price drops over time, is when to buy it, and the only gamble/risk is whether you are going to be getting a camera that will be replaced with a new model in four years (D700), two years (D800), or just one (D600).

D600 was a fluke. Their legal team gave them crappy advice to cover it up with an incremental upgrade, but it was too obvious, because Nikon never worked on a yearly cycle at FX.

The threat of lawsuit set them straight -- which is what lawsuits are intended to do! But I would not count on this happening again in FX.

If anything, this is an extremely blessed time to buy FX, because how messed up the pricing is, thanks to that ridiculous fluke. You can buy a PRO Nikon FX for anywhere between $1000-$3500 dollars: D700(used), D600, D610, Df, D800, D3, D800E, D3S(used), D810, in that pricing order.

ALL EXCELLENT CAMERAS (and the D600 even has a 100% guarantee behind thanks to Nikon owning up finally to the problem). No one has a right to complain in this environment.

Its a wonderful time for FX users.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 28, 2014 at 05:42 UTC
In reply to:

peevee1: "Sometimes we need a gentle polish, a tidy-up and a fix for the things that didn’t work so well the first time. And in the D810, that is exactly what we are getting"

How do you know that? Being an untested Nikon camera, it might have problem with focusing, or with oil, or they managed to invent some new problem. :-)

Besides, being intermediate "almost-non-upgrade" means than the next upgrade will be as big as D700 to D800E. You simply get more value being an early adopter after a significant change than early adopter of basically the same old thing - much more life left in your purchase.

I thought that they have a Hands-On preview already?

If so, that's probably how they know that. Although the author certainly leaves the doubt...

Direct link | Posted on Jun 28, 2014 at 05:36 UTC
Total: 56, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous123Next ›Last »