Dan

Dan

Lives in United States USA, MO, United States
Joined on Oct 1, 2001

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Total: 242, showing: 1 – 20
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The problem with most of these comments is that they come from "enthusiasts" expecting too much. They forget the target audience of this camera. I shoot mainly with a D600, and I after searching for the "best" pocket camera, I ended up buying an HX30V. I love my Sony.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2013 at 19:33 UTC as 17th comment
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I am waiting for a company to just say the heck with it and come out with a camera with a 1/3" sensor and a 20-1000mm F8.0 lens. They know that the average consumers have no idea what the lens specs mean.

The only thing the average consumer knows are megapixels and 50x zoom and that is what Sony, Canon, and Nikon are giving them.

However, Panasonic and Olympus know that eventually people will realize that the most important thing in a small sensor camera is the lens because that can make up for the fact that the sensor is so much smaller and still has way too many megapixels.

This Sony DSC-HX50V has one of the slowest lenses I have ever seen on a really small sensor. Why in the world do people think that they need telescope focal lengths in a pocket camera?

I don't like Panasonic point & shoots. Bought the FZ150 and returned it. Got the HX30V instead, and I'm loving it.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2013 at 19:31 UTC
In reply to:

joe1512: Why so expensive? An SX260 is less than 200 bucks now. This buys you more zoom (30x), more unnecessary pixels and um... yeah I dunno. Wifi maybe?

Oh...but I can totally pay double and put that huge freaking Viewfinder on the top of my compact camera. Score!!
Or maybe that freaking Flash thats bigger than the camera itself and probably drains half the battery. I hear those are really awesome on 30x zoom cameras!

You need to be able to daisy chain the peripherals so I can have a huge flash, a monster microphone AND the gigantic viewfinder all piled on top of my little camera.

No one comes close to Sony as far as video is concerned.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2013 at 19:20 UTC
In reply to:

JackM: there's a sucker born every minute, and someone is going to sell them a superzoom.

I shoot mainly with a D600, and I love my HX30V, so....

No one can beat Sony for video shooting either. That active mode image stabilization is unbeatable.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2013 at 19:15 UTC
In reply to:

heehee62: Looks like this camera will blow all other cameras in it's class away!

I don't know why all the people who complain about the sensor size and pixel count bother. It's obviously not the right camera for them but that doesn't mean it's not right for anyone else.

For me, I want a very light travel camera used primarily for video while traveling, safari photos where I need great zoom, and outdoor adventures where low light isn't a concern - the perfect camera for me and better than any other camera available!

I agree with the OP. I shoot mainly with a D600, and I have an HX30V. The IQ from the Sony is fine. I love that camera! I think people are getting too picky when they complain about the IQ.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2013 at 19:11 UTC
In reply to:

ShutterAttache: Sony has messed up big time. on the out side, it has a lot of features that i would look for in a all around camera that would get used often. however, on the inside. the camera lacks a lot of features that would make this a winner.

Pros:
30x zoom range on a compact body.
physical control dials/buttons.
standard hot shoe.
a proper full featured WiFi mode.
professional look (not having a lot of writing on the front other than the company name and g lens badge)

Cons:
small sensor vs large amount of megapixels.
no raw support.
no noise reduction options.
no built-in standard headphone/mic jack.

so as you noticed. i did not really complain about aperture or price point because the major focus for me is the lack of RAW and NR options. i think if you are paying 400$ and up for a camera, RAW support and noise reduction options for JPEGs should be available at this price point. and this is not limited to Sony. any other major camera company should do this as well.

I have the HX30V, and the only thing I wish for is the ability to save a copy of the original image. Sometimes in the auto mode, it does things I do not like (such as go into HDR mode, making the image look terrible). If I don't use the auto mode, low-light images suffer from camera shake.

RAW would be nice but most of those features you're asking for don't belong to the target audience of this camera. They belong to the $700 point & shoots.

But it's nice to wish and dream.

BTW, I LOVE the HX30V, and I shoot mainly with a D600.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2013 at 18:59 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon D7100 in-depth review article (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

lera ion: lack of low-pass filter greatly reduces maintenance costs in perspective dust and oil spots.
Buffer; 6-9 RAW/ D7100; 30-45 RAW/D300s. Price-quality is OK, but take your time.

How?

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2013 at 18:20 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon D7100 in-depth review article (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

disasterpiece: I'm kind of sorry that I didn't wait for D7100 when I bought a D7000 four months ago, but then again, the differences are not huge. Also, I tend to disagree with the hint that there will be D7000 owners wanting to get the D7100 - for me, it makes no sense to 'upgrade' to the same class and only one generation newer body. Again, for me, the more logical step up is an FX body with the appropriate lenses.

My biggest reason for going with the D7100 over the D7000 is the quickness of the AF system. The D7000 AF system is just unacceptably slow for me, while the AF system in the D7100 is blazing fast. This alone is enough of a reason to want the D7100 over the D7000.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2013 at 18:03 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon D7100 in-depth review article (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

dennishancock: I have recently migrated to the D7100 from the D90 and it's proving a quantum jump in image quality, noise, color rendition, focus response, and features.

What condemns the D7100 to the insanely good category as opposed to the insanely great in my mind is the issue heavily discussed here--the image buffer. I'm not a sports oriented photographer and I'm OK with jpegs, but the thought that skimping on two dollars worth of memory is Nikon technical management's idea of the pursuit of technical excellence is astounding.

I'm getting a burst of 18 jpegs before the frame rate drops by approximately two-thirds. ( DX mode, optimal compression quality, fine image quality, large image size.)

Considering this camera is otherwise a technical tour de force, it appears Nikon technical management wasn't thinking. Marketing should be asking how many sales of the D7100 it will be losing because of this gaffe. Heads should roll. I know they would in America.

P.S. Great review, DpReview!

Purposely crippling a camera in this way is not cool Nikon.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2013 at 18:00 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon D7100 in-depth review article (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

mforbes: You guys crack me up, complaining about the buffer, I make my living taking photos of outdoor adventure events, zip lining, white water rafting etc., I use Nikon gear and have no idea what the buffer size is in any of my cameras, we don't have time to spray and pray and have the guests sort through a bunch of images and pick out the ones they buy, we do that for them by getting one or two good photos of them. If you need a large buffer for Fido running around the backyard, get a V1.

What annoys me are people that accuse others of spraying & praying. What gives you the right to tell me whether or not the buffer is adequate? Do you know exactly what I'm shooting and how I use the camera? If it's big enough for you, congratulations. For others, this buffer size is horribly insufficient.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2013 at 17:56 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon D7100 in-depth review article (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

RichDawson: Been looking for a new dslr and thinking of waiting for the Canon sl1.http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/slr_cameras/eos_rebel_sl1_18_55mm_is_stm_kit

But this nikon camera looks promising.

That's like trying to decide between a Corolla and an Avalon.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2013 at 17:47 UTC

What he should do is clean the sensor and then do another run of 1000 frames. I'll bet most of the junk would be gone by then.

I had debris accumulate on the sensor of my D600 but after I cleaned it, it has remained clean for quite some time. Anytime I notice something, a quick blow with a blower bulb gets it right off. I love my D600.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 6, 2012 at 02:13 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
On Nikon D5200 Hands-on Preview preview (213 comments in total)
In reply to:

jspringer17: Need advice! thinking about purchasing either the Nikon D 7000 or the Nikon D 5200.my question is, is it worth waiting for the 5200 to come out or do you think the 7000 is a better overall camera for the money? Please help!

What do you expect to gain by choosing the D7000?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2012 at 22:10 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon D600 In-depth Review article (499 comments in total)
In reply to:

simon65: The images look soft throughout and are surprisingly noisy above 2000 ISO. On top of this there are some strange colour renditions - the orange autumn leaves in slide 22/35.

In the 'compared to' section the D600 is consistently soft against a range of competitors.

Frankly this camera surprises on the downside, something that comes as a bit of a shock to me. I thought it would be a belter. It's not.

All you have to do is turn up the sharpness. That's what I do, and it gets so sharp that I turn it down depending on what lens I use.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2012 at 21:54 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon D600 In-depth Review article (499 comments in total)
In reply to:

aardvark7: I find the start of the conclusion a little 'odd'. Hard to put into words, but it sounds like positively raving over normality: "it matches or exceeds the pixel count of every other full-frame system camera." (in italics to make sure we noticed the stress!) which makes it seem like there are thousands of rivals on the market!
Also, it praises the 'flexibility' as though being so much more than anything else, whereas it just sounds to me what might be expected in a camera of this price. I don't want to be to 'extreme', but I could almost imagine they were on the verge of saying " and it has a viewfinder too and a lovely strap!"
Come on DPReview! I wouldn't for a second think this is not a spectacularly good camera (it is, after all, the latet technology and thousands of dollars), but can we have a more rounded and balanced conclusion, please?

The D600 blew away (exceeded) my expectations when I actually handled it. If you haven't tried it, you should. It truly is an awesome camera.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2012 at 21:46 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon D600 In-depth Review article (499 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dan: I had to return my 1st D600 because of a reappearing spot on the sensor (suspected to be oil). I'm going to be watching the sensor of my 2nd D600 closely.

Still, the quality of the camera (the speed, AF precision & accuracy) is so nice that I'm willing to put up with an occasional wet sensor cleaning. I've invested in Eclipse Type 3 Sensor Swabs along with their cleaning solution.

Also, I'm not saying that the oil/dust problem is acceptable at all. Nikon needs to find a permanent fix for this and repair affected models for free including shipping. But this camera is so much better than my D300 that I just cannot go back to using that thing.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2012 at 21:13 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon D600 In-depth Review article (499 comments in total)
In reply to:

photoac: Shame about the dust.

I'd prefer that the oil stay off of my sensor =)

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2012 at 21:11 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon D600 In-depth Review article (499 comments in total)
In reply to:

IrishhAndy: Happy with my D700. This camera has too many compromises for me and the lens selection is poor.

You can't say you're happy with your D700 until you've actually handled a D600...or have you?

What exactly do you mean when you say that the lens selection is poor?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2012 at 21:10 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon D600 In-depth Review article (499 comments in total)

I had to return my 1st D600 because of a reappearing spot on the sensor (suspected to be oil). I'm going to be watching the sensor of my 2nd D600 closely.

Still, the quality of the camera (the speed, AF precision & accuracy) is so nice that I'm willing to put up with an occasional wet sensor cleaning. I've invested in Eclipse Type 3 Sensor Swabs along with their cleaning solution.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2012 at 20:57 UTC as 127th comment | 2 replies
On Just Posted: Nikon D600 In-depth Review article (499 comments in total)
In reply to:

jonikon: For some inexplicable reason in their evaluation of the AF settings of the D600, DPR fails to understand the advantage of software driven settings that allow the setting to be saved under the User Settings 1,2 on the mode dial, as opposed to hardware controls that would make that impossible. I feel DPR should at least point out the advantage of storing the AF settings that have been moved from a hard control to a software control.

Here is the quoted excerpts from page 11- Handling.:
"This 'simplification' comes at a cost, however. Specifically, it makes switching between AF-S and AF-C, and indeed changing AF pattern mode, slower than it was Nikon's previous generation DSLRs. Using the D300S, for example, a quick flick of the left thumb is all it took to go from single AF to continuous, and a quick flick of the rear lever would switch from single-point AF to multi-pattern. With the D600 (and the D800 and D4) there's an extra step - a button press - in both cases. " - DPReview

I sure do miss those switches that were on my D300. Every time I change settings, I have to look at the LCD to see if I'm turning the wheel the right way. It greatly slows things down.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2012 at 20:53 UTC
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