Baxter Bad

Baxter Bad

Lives in United States AK, United States
Joined on Sep 17, 2011

Comments

Total: 92, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Ben Raven: HELLO, SONY -- A7r Electronic First Curtain Update !
PRONTO !

Get on this same EFC shutter firmware update for the A7r.
You've already got it in the A7 . . .

Let us say 'Ba-Bye' to shutter shock and clunk-clunk.

Thank you for your prompt attention.

Ben, when the cameras came out, I read or watched dozens of previews and in one of them, the reviewer mentioned the reason as they understood it from a Sony rep. Or maybe it was a Q&A page? Anyway, I just spent half an hour backtracking to find the link for you, but there's so much much noise out there right now over this issue, whatever I saw is buried. I'll keep looking, because now it's bothering me.

There's speculation that the A7R sensor is based on the D800E sensor, which doesn't support EFC. Which makes sense to me, but it's not the reason I recall.

EDIT: I just read Stephen's comment about the speed limit - that's the reason I recall being stated by Sony. (Thanks, Stephen.)

Direct link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 17:33 UTC
In reply to:

Ben Raven: HELLO, SONY -- A7r Electronic First Curtain Update !
PRONTO !

Get on this same EFC shutter firmware update for the A7r.
You've already got it in the A7 . . .

Let us say 'Ba-Bye' to shutter shock and clunk-clunk.

Thank you for your prompt attention.

I believe Sony has explained why they didn't include EFC on the A7R, don't think adding it via firmware is possible.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 16:39 UTC
In reply to:

Michael Ma: No 24p. I guess no one cares.

No one at Olympus.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 16:36 UTC

An extra $50 for the ZS40 nets you 24-720mm, raw, evf, 920k lcd, gps and an all-black color option (as well as panda).

But can Panasonic's OIS keep up with 5-axis Jesus? I don't know, but I have hundreds of sharp photos taken handheld at 1200mm equivalent with my $279 FZ70 that tell me I don't care.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 31, 2014 at 10:35 UTC as 26th comment | 3 replies
On Nikon 1 V3: a quick summary article (597 comments in total)

In an alternate universe, the Ricoh GX100 might have evolved into something like this. No snap focus, but with such fast AF performance it might not matter.

I really miss my ol' GX. I wonder if the UI on this thing can even come close.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 13, 2014 at 21:32 UTC as 93rd comment
On Sony a6000 First Impressions Review preview (899 comments in total)

No silver body for the U.S.? This is very important.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 12, 2014 at 18:45 UTC as 184th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Baxter Bad: All this confusion about the ergonomics. Maybe Sigma polled its customers and learned that 95% of DPs are being used for landscapes and studio portraits, so they decided to make the next versions highly specialized for tripod work.

We get a wide body that lets you change the battery without taking the camera off the tripod. A "reversed" grip with all the controls on the back (including focus) and offset for easy access - we never have to reach for the focus ring. Optical finder only - perfect for landscapes, removable for the studio.

Well, that's my guess about the design rationale. Or maybe all the employees were playing too much Flappy Bird.

@HowaboutRAW - Reading is fundamental. Pass the word to SeeRoy.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 12, 2014 at 18:39 UTC
In reply to:

Baxter Bad: All this confusion about the ergonomics. Maybe Sigma polled its customers and learned that 95% of DPs are being used for landscapes and studio portraits, so they decided to make the next versions highly specialized for tripod work.

We get a wide body that lets you change the battery without taking the camera off the tripod. A "reversed" grip with all the controls on the back (including focus) and offset for easy access - we never have to reach for the focus ring. Optical finder only - perfect for landscapes, removable for the studio.

Well, that's my guess about the design rationale. Or maybe all the employees were playing too much Flappy Bird.

@SeeRoy - It's optional (clips onto the hot shoe). I see you're really interested in this product.

@HBowman - I owned a DP2 Merrill, a DP1s and a DP2. Not all tripod heads are the same or have controls that won't hinder battery access. The width of the Quattros should clear every tripod known to humanity. Or... maybe Sigma plans to introduce an accessory that uses the tripod mount and requires the extra clearance?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 12, 2014 at 12:48 UTC

All this confusion about the ergonomics. Maybe Sigma polled its customers and learned that 95% of DPs are being used for landscapes and studio portraits, so they decided to make the next versions highly specialized for tripod work.

We get a wide body that lets you change the battery without taking the camera off the tripod. A "reversed" grip with all the controls on the back (including focus) and offset for easy access - we never have to reach for the focus ring. Optical finder only - perfect for landscapes, removable for the studio.

Well, that's my guess about the design rationale. Or maybe all the employees were playing too much Flappy Bird.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 12, 2014 at 03:45 UTC as 24th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

MrJabbee: seriously, i think i'm going to throw up

the form factor is absolutely disgusting

ergonomics? in a rectangle? i guess i can only guess, because i never held such a shape before

Aww, Jabbee. You strain your hand so much more in other activities, holding this should be no problem. Man up.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2014 at 23:51 UTC
In reply to:

mike kobal: obviously inspired by old cordless phone receivers, if sigma really managed to improve on image quality, processing and af speed, i will get one, love the foveon output, even if it had a rotary dial.

Probably the best design analogy so far, kudos.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2014 at 23:47 UTC
In reply to:

whtchocla7e: If an external EVF is an option, I'm interested.

It's not. Just saved you a thousand bucks, you're welcome.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2014 at 23:44 UTC
In reply to:

Kevin Purcell: The Sigma claim that the three layers are blue, green and red is just not true. It's marketing BS along with the 39MPx claim.

The probablility of a photon being absorbed in the top layer is highest for the blue, next most light for greenish and least likely for the red but all three do get some absortion in that layer. It's a desaturated bluish cyan.

In the middle layer a lot of the blue has been filtered (but not all) so that middle layer is a desaturated greenish yellow (some blue, some red and mostly green). The bottom layer is orangish red (mostly red, a little green and a very little blue).

To get to real RGB primaries you have to stick these (noisy) signal though a color matrix to remove the crosstalk between the colors (giving even noisier RGB signal out).

This is the major reason for Foeveon sensors poor high ISO performance (noise goes up quicker than you'd expect) and poor color fidelity (because your original primaries aren't very good).

Chewie, take the professor in back and plug him into the hyperdrive.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2014 at 23:42 UTC

Wild. Looks like it was designed by a Modernist architect, with Sixties build quality to boot. Retro... and futuristic... at the same time! Glad to see something that's not another clone of my grandpa's camera.

If the technology delivers, this could be the one that gets me to break out the tripod and put some time again into slow photography.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2014 at 17:29 UTC as 128th comment
On Fujifilm X-T1 First Impressions Review preview (1657 comments in total)
In reply to:

Photato: The video might be 36mbps but I bet is still using consumer grade chroma subsampling.
Also, when are they going to realize that an articulated screen that can face forward is really usefull for many situations?

When I read about 3 top plate dials I always wonder if someone finally figured out, but is still the same old film paradigm.

Great camera thouh pacaked with lots of features.

What are the "many situations" that an articulating screen is useful on a stills camera? Selfies? What else? The other thing I've heard is "stowing the LCD for transport." Fear-based nonsense.

On the other hand, most articulating screens don't fold out to 180 degrees, so when you try to use them for waist-level/overhead shooting, the screen isn't aligned with the plane of focus and framing becomes wonky. Even when the screen does fold out to 180, it's an awkward user experience.

So, what would most enthusiast photographers rather have? The capability for quick and accurate waist-level/overhead framing, or selfies? I think the camera companies have done some research into the issue and learned the obvious answer, which is why we're seeing less and less articulating screens each year.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 28, 2014 at 17:51 UTC
In reply to:

Baxter Bad: Read the interview with the photographer on 500px. She doesn't claim to be a poor farm woman to whom a fairy gave an enchanted 5D2.

She was an architect who stopped working to raise her kids, but instead of sitting around letting the husband foot the bill for everything, she put her creativity to work and is making money with her camera only a year and a half after discovering photography.

She refers to the location as a cottage, not a farm. She and her family can afford a country home, not incredibly surprising as they seem to be professionals.

She sketches her photo ideas before having her kids pose for them. This is an art project, not a bunch of snapshots.

She doesn't deny manipulating the images. She states plainly that she does a lot of work in post, but doesn't go into the specific techniques, which she covers in her seminars.

If the photographs were presented as some kind of documentary on rural Russian life, that appears to be the press' fault, not hers.

@Antony - For some people, the truth behind the image has everything to do with their ability to enjoy it.

Having done some due diligence, I can now appreciate these images for what they are rather than some pre-conceived idea about what they should be.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 26, 2014 at 16:27 UTC

Read the interview with the photographer on 500px. She doesn't claim to be a poor farm woman to whom a fairy gave an enchanted 5D2.

She was an architect who stopped working to raise her kids, but instead of sitting around letting the husband foot the bill for everything, she put her creativity to work and is making money with her camera only a year and a half after discovering photography.

She refers to the location as a cottage, not a farm. She and her family can afford a country home, not incredibly surprising as they seem to be professionals.

She sketches her photo ideas before having her kids pose for them. This is an art project, not a bunch of snapshots.

She doesn't deny manipulating the images. She states plainly that she does a lot of work in post, but doesn't go into the specific techniques, which she covers in her seminars.

If the photographs were presented as some kind of documentary on rural Russian life, that appears to be the press' fault, not hers.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 26, 2014 at 15:19 UTC as 222nd comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

Baxter Bad: At $750, the world spat on the Pentax K-01 and five people bought it. At $300, giggly impulse buyers fell over themselves to sing its praises, and of course, the design wasn't so bad after all.

When the GH3 comes down to $899, it should be able to resurrect the dead and steal Angelina Jolie away from Brad Pitt.

I wasn't criticizing the K-01 design... I was speaking in the voice of those who did when it was announced, then softened their position after the price dropped. C'mon, don't you guys read any fiction? Step away from those tech manuals!

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2013 at 13:41 UTC
In reply to:

tbaker: Make sense, since it an over priced camera with no real redeeming features.

Go ahead, give us a list of what you consider to be redeeming features in a camera, so we can compare it to the feature list of the GH3. I dare you.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 14, 2013 at 22:10 UTC

At $750, the world spat on the Pentax K-01 and five people bought it. At $300, giggly impulse buyers fell over themselves to sing its praises, and of course, the design wasn't so bad after all.

When the GH3 comes down to $899, it should be able to resurrect the dead and steal Angelina Jolie away from Brad Pitt.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 14, 2013 at 22:07 UTC as 36th comment | 4 replies
Total: 92, showing: 1 – 20
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