Reg Natarajan

Reg Natarajan

Lives in Canada Vancouver, BC, Canada
Works as a www.esecuredata.com
Has a website at www.regnatarajan.ca
Joined on Nov 9, 2001

Comments

Total: 145, showing: 61 – 80
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In reply to:

Phototaker41: MY dream camera is: small, pocketable, full frame with interchageable lens and low ligh High ISO , very low noise good details at ISO 6400

Pocketable full frame with interchangeable lenses. lol. I want one, too, but I won't be holding my breath. Those pesky laws of physics.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 20, 2012 at 00:00 UTC
On Fujifilm XF1 Preview preview (129 comments in total)

This is shallow of me but I do wish it came in black.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 19, 2012 at 07:13 UTC as 19th comment | 2 replies
On Fujifilm XF1 Preview preview (129 comments in total)

I didn't pay a lot of attention at first, but in retrospect, I think this may be the perfect take-everywhere camera. It appears to be an X10 that fits in my pocket.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 16, 2012 at 08:38 UTC as 22nd comment
On Cameras get 'smart' to stay competitive post (58 comments in total)
In reply to:

jhoff80: I really just wish there was an option like the Toshiba card and like the EyeFi card that just made the camera show as simple network attached storage, instead of needing a specific client like EyeFi, or having to do stuff through the browser like with the FlashAi card.

That's interesting. I've never had a single glitch with the client, myself. I can see the appeal of a wifi NAS mounted as a drive, but if they ever do adopt your proposed method, I hope they also leave the current system alone for those of us who like it. I don't want to do it manually.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2012 at 09:03 UTC
On Cameras get 'smart' to stay competitive post (58 comments in total)
In reply to:

Deleted pending purge: Without having tried it yet, I wonder how the WiFi card works out of all-metal camera casing, since EM waves can't pass through it. At a first glance, it would work as expected only in plastic cameras, and even then, there are sometimes metal-shielded card slots...

Sure, and I'm respectfully suggesting you're inadequately covering the best way to "upload or share when you're away from your computer". Many people get stuck in the workflow they're familiar with, namely "copy files to phone, then email/upload to destination". They don't realize there is a much better way, regardless of where you want the photos to end up.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 14, 2012 at 18:51 UTC
On Cameras get 'smart' to stay competitive post (58 comments in total)
In reply to:

keeponkeepingon: Great subject!

However this article is missing any sort of metric to objectively compare the devices. What we are left with is basically a survey of the companies marketing material and technical specs but we are missing what makes dpreview great: Objective measurements of performance!

For example how long does it take each device to transfer 100 pictures to an iphone? To face book? To my computer?

Also under connectivity you are omitting connectivity to a computer: Do all of these devices allow transfer of full size raw and video files to a computer?

Actually I don't think you mention if all of the devices support transfer of videos? Do they?

Thanks!

To answer your question for the tech I use, EyeFi supports transfer of full size video to your local computer (and therefore to Dropbox), and to Flickr and Picasa (at whatever resolution those two services permit).

I totally disagree on the topic of objective measures, however. They are just not relevant here. Who cares if one takes 20 seconds and the other 25 seconds? That's not relevant at all here. Feature set (such as your video question) is important. Overall convenience, ease of use, reliability and other such intangibles are important. There's a time and place for metrics and this isn't it.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 14, 2012 at 07:55 UTC
On Cameras get 'smart' to stay competitive post (58 comments in total)
In reply to:

jhoff80: I really just wish there was an option like the Toshiba card and like the EyeFi card that just made the camera show as simple network attached storage, instead of needing a specific client like EyeFi, or having to do stuff through the browser like with the FlashAi card.

You may have the wrong idea. EyeFi needs a client to configure the card the first time. That's it. After that, you only need the client running if you want your images copied to that local computer. If you just want them up on Flickr, you can turn off your local computer totally.

Personally, I run the Windows client so I can get my photos into my Dropbox. I also configure EyeFi to upload them to Flickr. I take a photo and I have to do nothing other than turn on the camera when I get home to get them to those two places. This has been working flawlessly for a couple of years, now. I'm amazed more people aren't into it.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 14, 2012 at 07:48 UTC
On Cameras get 'smart' to stay competitive post (58 comments in total)
In reply to:

Deleted pending purge: Without having tried it yet, I wonder how the WiFi card works out of all-metal camera casing, since EM waves can't pass through it. At a first glance, it would work as expected only in plastic cameras, and even then, there are sometimes metal-shielded card slots...

I've been using EyeFi cards in my Fuji X10 (all metal) for roughly a year, and in my Sony DSC-TX100V (all metal) for roughly two years. No issues at all. Works perfectly.

I actually don't think DPReview did an adequate job of communicating just how easy these things make the workflow. I take a picture and when I get home, it's up on Flickr and in my Dropbox. All this talk about photo uploader apps is absurd to me. EyeFi has been doing it the way it should be done for years.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 14, 2012 at 07:41 UTC
On Cameras get 'smart' to stay competitive post (58 comments in total)
In reply to:

Den Lim: what camera is that in the first pic with the articulated screen?

I wondered that, too. Good looking camera.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 13, 2012 at 00:19 UTC
On Cameras get 'smart' to stay competitive post (58 comments in total)

I didn't realize the Toshiba cards have an HTML server built in. Elegant, although less convenient than EyeFi, which I've been using for a few years. EyeFi means I shoot a photo and, when I get home, it's up on Flickr. Tough to beat that.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 12, 2012 at 19:31 UTC as 29th comment
On Announcing connect.dpreview.com article (250 comments in total)

People are people. The mostly-stupid discourse we see in this very comments section won't occur at the new site, of course, but it will be replaced by equally stupid discourse on other topics. The Apple people will say you can't do anything on Android. The Android people will say you can't do anything on IPhone, and that Apple people all hide pictures of Steve Jobs in their underwear. The guys using Android cameras will be snobs about how much better their IQ is, much like the DSLR/Mirrorless crowd here looks down on camera phones. Again, people are people, and they like to bicker.

It won't be perfect but I'll take it. I'm happy the new site exists, and I'm happy they're splitting mobile/connected photography out of the main site. For me, the best part is that, over there, I presumably won't have to read a bunch of old fuddy duddies being fuddy duddies while writing that it's nothing about being a fuddy duddy.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 11, 2012 at 03:08 UTC as 32nd comment | 2 replies
On Announcing connect.dpreview.com article (250 comments in total)
In reply to:

HubertChen: I wonder why two sites instead of one? By this choice you emphasize how different mobile photography is from what you refer to as "serious" photography. I believe this is an opportunity lost for dpreview to grow as a community. By your choice of two different sites you are promoting the focus on technology rather than photography. It is a subtle difference if dpreview a) focus on the technical aspects of photography to be complimentary to other websites who focus on the artistic side or b) focus on the technical side of photography because this is all what you can see. This difference of view is shaping attitude. Where readers of type a) would embrace mobile photography and look for things to learn from this new exciting community, readers of type b) would alienate. I am afraid for dpreview that your choice of two sites will attract more readers of type b) and repel more type a), making dpreview a less attractive place for me to come back to.

Hubert, you seem like a good guy, but you're off base on this. There's no learning from each other going on here. There are just two groups insulting each other. There's one group that fancies themselves "serious photographers", and they worry a lot about IQ and lenses and manual controls. There's another group that values mobility, connectivity, spontaneity and community over IQ. The two groups don't like each other, and they don't respect each other.

I'm guilty of this behaviour. Personally, I want to regurgitate every time I see another blurred background flower or insect macro or other such photographic cliche from some guy who shoots four times a year with a DSLR rig. I have no doubt at all that guy feels the same about my photography. I'm not going to convince him that his photography has no relevance. He's not going to convince me that mine has no beauty.

Sometimes, divorce is the right answer. I'll still come back here for a booty call now and then, though. :)

Direct link | Posted on Oct 10, 2012 at 08:06 UTC

Typo in the Nexus 7 specs: Android 7.1 (Jelly Bean) should be 4.1.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 10, 2012 at 04:54 UTC as 92nd comment
On Apple iPhone 5 Review post (16 comments in total)
In reply to:

vlad0: I've been taking pics with my iPhone 5 for the past week.. it does very well for it's sensor size, but when I put it up against my Nokia 808.. things don't look so good, especially at night..

Here is my little test from couple of days ago:

skydrive gallery: http://sdrv.ms/QOzrHB

Great gallery. Nothing beats seeing back to back comparison results, and you're right, the Nokia is vastly better.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 10, 2012 at 04:53 UTC
On Announcing connect.dpreview.com article (250 comments in total)

If I can make a suggestion: at the top right of the new site is a handy link to this site. If you matched that with a link here to the new site, it would be easy to switch back and forth.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 10, 2012 at 03:54 UTC as 65th comment | 1 reply
On Announcing connect.dpreview.com article (250 comments in total)
In reply to:

HubertChen: I wonder why two sites instead of one? By this choice you emphasize how different mobile photography is from what you refer to as "serious" photography. I believe this is an opportunity lost for dpreview to grow as a community. By your choice of two different sites you are promoting the focus on technology rather than photography. It is a subtle difference if dpreview a) focus on the technical aspects of photography to be complimentary to other websites who focus on the artistic side or b) focus on the technical side of photography because this is all what you can see. This difference of view is shaping attitude. Where readers of type a) would embrace mobile photography and look for things to learn from this new exciting community, readers of type b) would alienate. I am afraid for dpreview that your choice of two sites will attract more readers of type b) and repel more type a), making dpreview a less attractive place for me to come back to.

This site is full of old fuddy duddies who think anything innovative is stupid and who think anyone who likes mobile/connected photography is not a serious/skilled/talented photographer. The new site lets you explore that booming market without having to listen to a bunch of geriatrics whine that their kids' iPhone doesn't have interchangeable lenses. Great idea. Good move. I have just changed my bookmarks to go to the new site first, and will come back here to read news now and then.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 10, 2012 at 03:45 UTC
On Announcing connect.dpreview.com article (250 comments in total)

Looks great. Actually looks better than this site.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 10, 2012 at 03:40 UTC as 68th comment | 4 replies

Reading these comments shows me just how disconnected from the new world many DP Review readers are. Connected devices are where the world is going. Sending my images instantly, from anywhere. Checking my email on any device I have handy. If you don't value it and don't see what the fuss is about, well, fine, but my opinion is you better get used to it. Me? I love the new world that's emerging.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 5, 2012 at 05:01 UTC as 27th comment

A bit more miniaturization and this thing could be integrated into a pair of glasses.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2012 at 20:29 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

samhain: You know what's really funny?
Photographers are supposed to be the 'creative types', working in a creative industry.
Yet all I see are a bunch of fuddy duddy negative comments that sound like something close-minded grandparents would say.
This product is extremely unique, interesting and so far outside of the box it isn't even funny.
You would think people would be more supportive of this kind of thinking, even if they aren't interested in buying one.

I for one applaud Sony/Hasselblad for their weird, funky new camera.
Bravo Hassony, bravo!!

Creative? Unique? Out of the box? No, it's none of these things. People have been gilding the lily for as long as there have been rich people looking to show off their wealth. I'm surprised they didn't slap a designer name on it.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 06:28 UTC
Total: 145, showing: 61 – 80
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