loafair

loafair

Lives in Canada University of Waterloo, Canada
Works as a Aspiring Camera Engineer
Joined on Feb 17, 2006
About me:

*istDL
K10D
MX
DBG2
DA 12-24
DA* 50-135
FA 35 f/2
FA 43 f/1.9 limited
K 50 f/1.4
FA 50 f/1.4
FA 77 f/1.8 limited

AF540FGZ
Vivitar 283

-Future Prospects-

My Degree

Comments

Total: 2, showing: 1 – 2
In reply to:

Anfernee Cheang: I don't see too many hints here. Although pixel-binning technology is applied, it does use a much bigger sensor than the normal phone cameras.

For example, if an 1/2.3" 12MP compact camera changes to a same size 36MP sensor, what's the point of using pixel-binning? I don't see much benefits unless it changes to an 1/1.2" 36MP one and applies pixel-binning. But then what's the difference if it directly changes to an 1/1.2" 12MP one?

"Size matters". That's the only truth till now.

BTW, I also think the IQ is really good from this camera :D

A 2.8 micron pixel will likely be better than a 4 - 1.4 um pixels. Fill factor will be higher with the 2.8 micron pixel as more area within a 2.8 micron square will be allocated to the photodiode or at least theoretically.... The reason being...4 - 1.4 micron pixels will required (assuming 4T pixel) 16 transistors whereas the 2.8 micron will only require 4.

As for noise with a 1.4 vs 2.8 micron pixel.... should be similar assuming the components are using the same process technology. The difference in volume required for the PD may increase certain noises specifically associated with the PD.

It has limitations yes, I agree, but the bigger picture (no pun intended) allows the camera to have greater flexibility when capturing images.

Photography is headed to an area where computational augmented hardware will be commonplace - nokia pureview is one example, lytro is another. The imaging world is quite interesting these days.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 28, 2012 at 04:02 UTC
In reply to:

Anfernee Cheang: I don't see too many hints here. Although pixel-binning technology is applied, it does use a much bigger sensor than the normal phone cameras.

For example, if an 1/2.3" 12MP compact camera changes to a same size 36MP sensor, what's the point of using pixel-binning? I don't see much benefits unless it changes to an 1/1.2" 36MP one and applies pixel-binning. But then what's the difference if it directly changes to an 1/1.2" 12MP one?

"Size matters". That's the only truth till now.

BTW, I also think the IQ is really good from this camera :D

The point of pixel binning is to also increase the SNR coming off the sensor.

Essentially, the intensity values of several pixels can be summed to equal one pixel thereby increasing the amount of signal. Noise level does NOT increase. This allows the sensor to appear to have a higher base-line sensitivity than it actually has.

Relevant: http://www.noao.edu/outreach/aop/glossary/binning.html

Direct link | Posted on Feb 28, 2012 at 01:52 UTC
Total: 2, showing: 1 – 2