jhinkey

jhinkey

Lives in United States Seattle, WA, United States
Works as a Aerospace Engineering Consultant
Has a website at www.hinkey.zenfolio.com
Joined on Dec 27, 2005

Comments

Total: 439, showing: 81 – 100
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In reply to:

cph71: i look forward to this. never been a fan of adapters, so great that we have more options

Likely the aperture is still manual. Can't imagine there is room for an aperture actuation motor+mechanism in these compact lenses - just an aperture position sensor I expect.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2015 at 22:19 UTC
In reply to:

mr.izo: only problem with these classical design range finder lenses (beside af obviously), is their short flange distance. this does helps build smaller footprint lenses and all that, but on the other hand shows problems with aberations, corner sharpness etc, which was proved many times using these lenses on mrl ff cameras. yes, they can have super sharp center sharpness, distinctive micro contrast and all that, but for some serious wide angle work (architecture, landscape, interiors..) i would be careful and check things first..
edit:
i forgot: usually, also min. focus distance is bigger on rf lenses, that can be very limited sometimes.

The 15/4.5-III is an all new design that is excellent on my A7RII. You do not know what you are talking about. I hope the 10mm is a modern design, not sure if they have modified the 12mm/5.6 from the current rangefinder design.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2015 at 22:17 UTC
In reply to:

SKPhoto12: Why 3 lenses with such close focal length? I don't understand the brand logic. One step back or two forward will cover that focal length. Why not market one lens with 12mm focal length? Provide all the electronics and I think it would sell better than the almost finished product.

"Why 3 lenses with such close focal length? I don't understand the brand logic."
They are very close in my book, but who cares now you have choices - you don't have to own all 3 after all.
I have the 15mm and would be interested in the 10 as those two are farther apart (closer than I typically like though). If I just had a ~20mm the 10mm would make even more sense.
For what I shoot when I carry primes, I consider "close" to be significantly within less than ~2x FOV of each other. Many other prime shooters like to carry a lot of lenses that are much closer in focal length.
With today's high MP high IQ full frame cameras if I need something in between my two primes I can usually just crop the wider prime.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2015 at 22:12 UTC
In reply to:

falconeyes: @Brittany Hillen:
> Sans an adapter

I read "Sans" is archaic and used by foreign speakers more than native speakers. It is French for without. Also in this thread, I see this word causes quite some confusion.

My question: Did you use this word for a reason, came it natural for you, or thinking about it now, would you use 'without' instead?

Are you a native speaker, US or UK?

I ask because I am curious to learn about the language. My native language is German.

Not unusual to use "sans" at all - I would suspect that those who use it and those who don't are in completely different socio-economic groups here in the USA.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2015 at 15:34 UTC
In reply to:

Francis Carver: Wow, an F5.6 single focal length lens, wow. Good lens on bright, sunny days on the beach and on the ski slopes, though.

Not very bright post. Make these lenses f/4 or f/2.8, etc. and they become large and/or poor corners even wide open. f/5.6 is just fine for a wide angle unless you do some things that need a lot of light in a short amount of time.
They are just fine for what they are.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2015 at 05:12 UTC

So sad that their are so many uniformed comments regarding the lack of AF with these lenses.
These UWA lenses don't need AF for the vast majority of the folks interested in this focal length on a full-frame A7 series body.

They will be perfect w/o AF+ full electronics as you get:
- auto magnify (if you want that)
- EXIF data recorded on the camera
- Auto lens corrections in post - if you want that too
- IBIS works automatically (if you are hand holding a really long exposure shot in low light, like I sometimes am forced to do)

I already have the 15/4.5-III which is fantastic. The 12 is a little too close in FOV, while the 10mm, if it's good, looks very interesting.

Link | Posted on Oct 10, 2015 at 23:19 UTC as 19th comment | 1 reply

Really it's only two very quick button presses on my A7RII to get to full magnification. In theory the ability to just turn the focus ring to get to some level of magnification is fine, but unfortunately Sony's implementation of manual focusing needs to be modified to be more useful (i.e., put a magnified view in the middle of the image in a small box that can be moved around instead of taking up the whole screen!).

Link | Posted on Oct 10, 2015 at 19:07 UTC as 23rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

MikeF4Black: Manual focus? What was Voigtlander thinking?

They were thinking quite smartly. Don't really need AF on such wide full frame lenses. Electronic communication to the camera though is excellent news.

Link | Posted on Oct 10, 2015 at 19:04 UTC
In reply to:

yahoo2u: ....."All three lenses will feature a Sony E-mount for use with full-frame Sony cameras sans an adapter."
.
It is "without an adapter"
.
If you want to throw in french expressions while writing english go to france.

"sans" is a commonly used term here in the USA.

Link | Posted on Oct 9, 2015 at 21:15 UTC
On article What difference does it make? Sony uncompressed Raw (618 comments in total)

At least we now have one option, to some of us it doesn't make a difference, to others it will.

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2015 at 19:05 UTC as 74th comment

Too bad they don't cover full frame . . . .

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2015 at 03:02 UTC as 21st comment | 7 replies
On article Sony brings uncompressed Raw to a7S II, a7R II and... (562 comments in total)

Good start, now can they allow 14 bit ARW files in silent shutter mode . . . . or when using LENR, etc. That would be fantastic.

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2015 at 01:00 UTC as 51st comment

A solution in search of a practical problem.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2015 at 20:19 UTC as 192nd comment

I've long ago switched to Canon inkjet printers precisely due to clogging issues that were the bane of my existence using Epson printers. Maybe they've improved significantly, but I now have 3 Canon printers - one of which gets used once per year and is flawless when I fire it up.

Don't mind the high cost of ink as I just don't print that much or more than 13" wide. High ink usage folks may feel differently.

Link | Posted on Sep 5, 2015 at 17:14 UTC as 13th comment
On article Panasonic confirms Lumix G 25mm F1.7 (206 comments in total)

Great and all, but please give us a 20/1.2 or 25/1.2 - i.e., something truly special, not yet another near-normal focal length lens that's not all that fast by today's standards. The 42.5/1.2 PL is a bit lonely as the only f/1.2 lens in the Panny lens lineup.

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2015 at 04:43 UTC as 33rd comment
In reply to:

alpha dog: It would be really interesting to see a comparison of the same shot on comparable non Sony kit (using similar generation/same resolution sensors). eg Compare Nikon D750 (uncompressed and compressed) v A7ii ('14 bit' compressed and '12 bit' compressed) to see how big a difference is visible - both in the high contrast edges and in pushed shadows.

Since I have the A7RII and a D800 I plan on shooting the same scene, with the same lens at the same exposure settings (aperture, shutter speed, and set ISO) in both 14 bit and 12 bit modes for each and see what the practical differences are, if any. This I need to do for myself - seems like DPR could have already done this.

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2015 at 17:13 UTC
In reply to:

jhinkey: Please shoot the same challenging scene in 12 bit and 14 bit modes and clearly show us the technical (100% pixel viewing super stretched shadows) AND the practical differences (typical viewing sizes and printed output).
Then the readers can decide if this matters to them.

Though I like these articles I find them not as focused/coherent as they could/should be - dpr can do better.

"That would demonstrate the effect of 14 vs. 12 bit but the effect of the "stripe compression" is pretty well demonstrated in the article."
Not for a "practical" use scenario - i.e., small displayed image size and/or printing, etc.

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2015 at 17:10 UTC

Please shoot the same challenging scene in 12 bit and 14 bit modes and clearly show us the technical (100% pixel viewing super stretched shadows) AND the practical differences (typical viewing sizes and printed output).
Then the readers can decide if this matters to them.

Though I like these articles I find them not as focused/coherent as they could/should be - dpr can do better.

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2015 at 16:27 UTC as 286th comment | 6 replies

Actually, this topic IS news if one were to read into the details.
Though NASA has used this kind of technique to image the compressible flow around supersonic aircraft in free flight, that was done by pointing the camera up at the sky and having the plane fly somewhat close to the edge of the image of the sun - which produces nearly parallel rays. This required the sun to be nearly in the frame, the camera to point at a certain location in the sky, and the jet to fly through that location at a certain time. All tricky to do.

This new method, hence "news" (but not for the reasons that the article title is written for, is that the camera is above, pointed downward at the surface of the earth, and a snapshot before and during the plane is in the frame are compared - the resulting distortion calculation gives the image of the density gradient field.

Sometimes DPR articles are too short - just like with most of our news these days..

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2015 at 21:17 UTC as 8th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

HFLM: Really old nows. Even our students were able to use this during their practical courses and it is taught in fluid mechanics course.

Yes, many years ago NASA started doing this. Not sure why it's now newsworthy.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2015 at 01:35 UTC
Total: 439, showing: 81 – 100
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