jhinkey

jhinkey

Lives in United States Seattle, WA, United States
Works as a Aerospace Engineering Consultant
Has a website at www.hinkey.zenfolio.com
Joined on Dec 27, 2005

Comments

Total: 240, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

jhinkey: Nice interview and I like the sales rep - seemed down to earth.

No touch screen - that's OK with me as I've turned it off on every camera I have that has one - too many times it's become more of a hindrance than a help for what I do.

No built-iin flash - this is perhaps the most troublesome missing feature for me as for a compact travel camera a built-in flash certainly comes in handy. But I must admit that having a fast lens and OIS will certainly help in this regard.

No swivel EVF - I use it occasionally on my GX-7, but it's not something I'd miss terribly

No tilting LCD - I think this is particularly problematic for me as I use this a lot on my GX-7 and A7R.

The LX100 would be a no-brainer for me if it had the swivel screen (and perhaps built-in flash) as it would replace my GX-7 + 12-35/2.8 for my general compact video rig.

I may sell my 12-35/2.8 and get the LX100 in it's place.
I've been using primes mostly on my GX7 anyways and for general video it's been the 12-35/2.8.

This seems like it would be a great backpacking camera, especially if it had the tilt screen and built-in flash.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 18, 2014 at 17:42 UTC

Nice interview and I like the sales rep - seemed down to earth.

No touch screen - that's OK with me as I've turned it off on every camera I have that has one - too many times it's become more of a hindrance than a help for what I do.

No built-iin flash - this is perhaps the most troublesome missing feature for me as for a compact travel camera a built-in flash certainly comes in handy. But I must admit that having a fast lens and OIS will certainly help in this regard.

No swivel EVF - I use it occasionally on my GX-7, but it's not something I'd miss terribly

No tilting LCD - I think this is particularly problematic for me as I use this a lot on my GX-7 and A7R.

The LX100 would be a no-brainer for me if it had the swivel screen (and perhaps built-in flash) as it would replace my GX-7 + 12-35/2.8 for my general compact video rig.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 18, 2014 at 16:53 UTC as 10th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Kirppu: I'm just wondering how will that complex design (all five groups can move, either together or independently) that has made this lens possible will stand the test of time. Will it last to the end of the warranty period or will it really be enough durable to last more than a year?

Exactly - and how will the centering be? My experience has been that lenses with lots of moving elements tend to either not have the best of centering or the centering can get worse over time.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 15, 2014 at 15:00 UTC

Hopefully the lens IQ does not let it down - otherwise it appears to be a fine camera by the specs and the externals. Looks like the LX7 is on the selling block.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 15, 2014 at 14:58 UTC as 28th comment

If I only could have one system it would be the Fuji - these guys seem to be doing things right (for stills photography).

Direct link | Posted on Sep 10, 2014 at 06:49 UTC as 29th comment
In reply to:

marcio_napoli: Yeah, right.

Just right, Sony, keep them coming, those bizarre, freakish gadgets you're trying to sell.

If one is serious enough for APS-C, yeah, go ahead... show you're tremendously serious about your photography, and plug it to your cell phone, to have the largest sensor-that-makes-zero-sense-plugged-to-your-pocketable-telephone.

Yeah, makes tons of sense.

As long as they can make $$ with these they will or at least if they think they can eventually make $$ with these will keep coming.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2014 at 04:14 UTC
In reply to:

jhinkey: I can see a lot of potential uses for the QX1 - uses where you want a compact imaging device with a big sensor and can use some decent (and potentially fast) glass.
I see a lot of creative types jumping all over this.

Yes there are small cameras, but none with an APS-C sensor and interchangeable lens mount with the diameter of a typical bullet camera.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2014 at 04:08 UTC

Actually, one of the reasons that people don't buy cameras is that the one device they have with them all the time (i.e., their cell phone or tablet) has a camera that's good enough most of the time. Many people hate having to carry around another gadget, even if it's an APS-C or m43-based compact camera.

This device is more compact than a camera to carry around and they can significantly improve their pictures without needing a full blown dedicated camera.

I think it will sell and sell well . . .

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2014 at 23:58 UTC as 33rd comment | 3 replies

I can see a lot of potential uses for the QX1 - uses where you want a compact imaging device with a big sensor and can use some decent (and potentially fast) glass.
I see a lot of creative types jumping all over this.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2014 at 23:49 UTC as 35th comment | 4 replies
On Opinion: Do we really need the Fuji X30? article (305 comments in total)
In reply to:

brownie314: Is this camera so bad that DPreview needed a propaganda piece on it to try and excuse it for not moving to a 1" sensor like all of its competitors?

Hipster - one of the most over-used, mis-used, and mis-understood word these days. Someone using something that has a style that was used 30 years ago doesn't automatically make them a "hipster."

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 23:13 UTC
On Opinion: Do we really need the Fuji X30? article (305 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jogger: We basically don't need any dedicated compact camera that doesnt have a large sensor, isnt a superzoom, or isnt ruggedised. Flagship phones are already using 1/2.3 sensor and some have even larger.

Even the best cell phones can't touch this 2/3 sensor for IQ. But only the photo buff will care. I have FX and m43 gear that has great IQ, but my wife thinks the images (in good light) that come from her Samsung S5 are more than good enough to share with her friends and family. So it all comes down to if you care enough about IQ to have a camera of this size. For some people the answer is yes, for others no. If I owned a camera like this (I do own a LX7) I'd certainly want to upgrade to the X30, not for the sensor, but for the EVF and lens.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 23:11 UTC
On Opinion: Do we really need the Fuji X30? article (305 comments in total)

"Design is disproportionately important to all X series cameras and I suspect a very large percentage of users are drawn by the way the cameras look and handle before they study the specification and read the test results. There's nothing wrong with that. Retro cool will be a winning factor for the X30 as much as it was for the X10 - and there will always be room for nice looking cameras that make it easy to take good pictures. "

Drivel at best. This article could have been so much better. The reason the shape and form of these cameras end up looking somewhat similar to cameras of decades ago is those film era cameras had great ergonomics for taking pictures and were not concerned with fashion statements. Just because something looks similar to something made in the past doesn't make it "retro" - what works works and will keep on being made that way - seems like all the modern, non-retro camera designs that attempt to be way different fail due to usability/silliness issues.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 16:42 UTC as 93rd comment

That was one of the most incomplete and not very informative articles I've seen in some time. There were more upgrades from the D800(e) than what he even talks about. Half the words are not even about the D810 . . .

Direct link | Posted on Jun 28, 2014 at 00:55 UTC as 74th comment
On Nikon AF-S Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G Lab Test Review preview (76 comments in total)

Disappointing off-center for us landscape-types. What's the impediment to designing a lens that is sharp across the frame when stopped down to f/5.6 or f/8? Wide open I can deal with sharpness fall-off, but at f/8 really?

Lots of lens bloat . . .

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2014 at 16:38 UTC as 23rd comment | 1 reply
On 1939: England in Color (part 3) article (90 comments in total)

Very very cool.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 9, 2014 at 00:06 UTC as 25th comment
On Portfolio: Photography student Luke Evans article (172 comments in total)

Interesting, but nothing that really grabbed me. Same could be said of my photography too I suppose.

Not sure why this guy is featured on DPR - seems like there are more interesting budding photographers out there that likely deserve more attention.

Direct link | Posted on May 28, 2014 at 22:06 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies
On Nikon issues firmware update for D800/D800E article (38 comments in total)

That last bug got me an annoying number of times: "In some rare cases, the memory card access lamp remained lit for longer than usual, and some time was required before any operations could be performed" Turn it on and the yellow light stays on for what seems forever, especially when you are in a hurry.

Just for this alone I'll upgrade the FW.

Direct link | Posted on May 14, 2014 at 18:19 UTC as 3rd comment
On Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R real-world samples gallery article (273 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jogger: Really makes the $1600 Panasonic "Leica" 42.5/1.2 look even less appealing and more of a rip-off. Is it $600 better than the Fuji?

Been loving my 42.5/1.2 for the past two weeks. Is it worth $1600 - perhaps not, but I jumped on one of the white/open box deals and grabbed one for $1299 - just inside my comfort zone.

I now have a lens that I don't hesitate to shoot wide open, even with the subject off to the side of the frame and I know it will be sharp.
AF is extremely fast and accurate. OIS is very very useful for candid portraits/shots in low light when the subject is still enough. OIS in video mode is handy too. Aperture ring a bonus.
It pairs well with my 20/1.7II and 75/1.8 Oly. I only wish the 20/1.7 and 75/1.8 had OIS as well (but my GX7's IBIS somewhat makes up for that).
The 42.5/1.2 is expensive for sure, but I wouldn't classify it as a "rip-off" by any means.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2014 at 15:40 UTC
On Updated: Creating the Leica T article (197 comments in total)
In reply to:

Antisthenes: > The incredible craftsmanship that goes into hand making
> a modern digital camera does not come cheap.

Let’s see:

a) Japanese robotic high-precision NC machining station (Makino)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DehW94gLRKM

b) Probably Japanese CMOS imaging sensor (Sony ?)

c) Probably Japanese lens manufacturing (Panasonic’s wavefront interference optical surface checkers ?)

The Leica T will certainly be a fine camera, but the results of this kind of “craftsmanship” can probably be bought for much cheaper by buying a Japanese camera, methinks ;-)

These cameras will not likely be a high production rate item compared to the competition, thus using CNC machining to cut out the body from blocks of aluminum is likely the cheaper way to go in the end (very little tooling and engineering costs) compared to other processes that require a lot of up front tooling/engineering. Cool, but not a process you'd use for making 100,000 of something like this.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 24, 2014 at 22:03 UTC
On A travel-sized large-format 4x5 camera? article (219 comments in total)

Ah, the sharpest, nicest image I've ever taken was with my 4x5 Toyo and Provia 100 with my beloved Fuji 400/8T . . . . don't miss the size and weight but man the IQ was amazing.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 21, 2014 at 23:40 UTC as 54th comment
Total: 240, showing: 21 – 40
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