stefanelf

stefanelf

Joined on Sep 29, 2011

Comments

Total: 8, showing: 1 – 8
On Why make a small-sensor mirrorless camera? article (279 comments in total)
In reply to:

DaveMarx: Sensor size is a non-issue, or soon will be. The inherent technical quality of a 4x5 negative will always beat 35mm. We still moved from Speed Graphics to Nikons. Negative quality was not the pivot point in our decisions. Do you think Nikon doesn't remember? We're at the point of diminishing returns on sensor quality when we have to push bench tests to ISO 800 or 1600 before we see a meaningful difference between sensor sizes. That's like Tri-X vs. Plus-X, man!

10 FPS full-feature shooting? Near-instant AF? A bag full of lenses and bodies half the bulk and weight of today's? One photographer in the right place at the right time, with one camera, one family of lenses, able to sell both stills and motion... We'll see V1s on football sidelines and at news events, and we'll follow. This is how Nikon created the era of the SLR.

They'll keep supporting the legacy format, too. Folks will switch whenever they're ready, and not before. But, flippin' mirror, you're the weakest link. Goodbye!

Perhaps the problem is that most companies have to go where to money is. Nikon is here braving the market with a product that emphasises something the rest of the market doesn't: a bridge between video and still imagery. Totally seamless.
While I'm not in the market for this kind of camera, I will be interested in seeing what kind of reception the market will give this system. If Nikon manages to carve out a new niche in the photography market then I'm also very interested in where this is going to lead. Like watching them launch the D1 all those years ago, which has ultimately resulted in cameras still using a similar system as the D1 did but with IQ that totally beats the pants off the original D1. Very interesting developments!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2011 at 09:28 UTC
On Why make a small-sensor mirrorless camera? article (279 comments in total)
In reply to:

AlexMart: I can't tell if this is going to be a successful system or not but I can find a few problems and I don't agree that the smaller sensor is an advantage or even a good move.
Some problems:
Design - I like it but is very "industrial", don't seem made for the masses.

Sensor size - too close of the compact cameras that can fit a 10x zoom, and are smaller, cheaper and .... eventually with less IQ... will people care?!

Image quality - Nikon is probably the best in their DSLRs but with a sensor of this size they will lag behind.

Timing - too late, Sony and Olympus are leading the way.

Compatibility with DSLR system - put the adapter you want, with a 2.7x crop factor, just seems wrong.

Versatility - People that want a bit more than "point and shoot" knows that DOF control is of great importance.

A flop? Probably.

Just my 0.02

I agree that Nikon will likely have a difficult time making this system stick. Time will tell...

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2011 at 09:01 UTC
On Why make a small-sensor mirrorless camera? article (279 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gorpalm: As its all a roiling sea of speculation right now about the "why" and "wherefores" of developing this size, I'd like to add my 2cents - Firstly well done Nikon for upping the ante for all.

Their decision seems very marketing and sales platform led - producing a distinctive a category as possible to minimise PRIMARY-choice cannibalism of sales from their compacts (Potential purchasers of even top-end compact models would likely see the J1/V1 as too expensive, at least at launch), and their DSLRs (potential downgraders would see it as a step too far in terms of potential IQ, camera control, bokeh capability etc).

Yet its a great Second choice for Nikon fans taking the next step up from their compacts, or back-up "carry-anywhere" alternative to big DSLRs. And it opens up the arena of customers considering mirrorless whatever the brand - Olympus must be bracing for a fight w their mft models when prices settle, and on-the-fringes models like Samsung NX/Pentax Q? Forgeddabouddit.

One thing that I think is interesting is the F-mount lenses can be used with the 1 system. So Nikon at least symbolically stays faithful to their lens mount! This means that at least in theory, you can get excellent optical quality coupled with diminuitive size. Also, the 1 system is likely to be quieter than any DSLR. The big question is going to be IQ - that's what it all boils down to.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2011 at 08:59 UTC
On Why make a small-sensor mirrorless camera? article (279 comments in total)
In reply to:

N13L5: What if DSLR buyers who were not hoping for a cheaper, but simply a less clunky (meaning big and heavy) high quality camera from Nikon will be so disgusted with this type of conniving ploy, they'll go out of their way to buy a different vendor's DSLR next time?

If you base your selection of photography equipment solely on sentiment rather than sensibility and a careful study of your needs and wants, then no technical discussion will help your choice.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2011 at 08:54 UTC
On Why make a small-sensor mirrorless camera? article (279 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nerak50: What is someone who is looking for a camera that takes great pictures to do??? Nearly every comment is negative on most every camera. I come to these sites for help. Is there ANY camera worthy of praise?? I just want to purchase a camera, point and shoot or DSLR that takes great pictures AUTOMATICALLY. I know nothing about aperatures or anything. Please help!!

This forum is supposed to be of assistance to people of all backgrounds and not a turf-war between different brands. I believe that there is no camera in the world that automatically takes good pictures. However, with the Nikon 1 system even a novice is assisted in one crucial area where no other camera system (as far as I am aware) can help: the timing of a shot. With 60fps you can be sure to have caught the moment and if the autofocus indeed keeps up as Nikon says it will you will soon be able to capture moments. What you'll need to learn in that case is foremost framing, composition and lighting. But the Nikon 1 system is a revolution in the photo world - if it will stick!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2011 at 08:35 UTC
On Why make a small-sensor mirrorless camera? article (279 comments in total)
In reply to:

IMI Computer: Can F-Mount lenses be used here?

Yes, F-mount lenses can be used if you buy an additional adapter. This adapter costs several hundred $$$. But at least you're able to use both AF and VR on the F-mount lens!

It would look quite ridiculous to pair a J1 with something like the AF-S 70-200 f/2.8 VRII though.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2011 at 08:30 UTC
On Why make a small-sensor mirrorless camera? article (279 comments in total)

When reading the announcements of the J1 and V1 I was initially disappointed by the small sensor size. But then, like many others, I had anticipated a simple camera rivalling the Leica rangefinders in terms of IQ and sensor size. Instead we get an incredibly fast AF and high fps along with high-res video capabilities. This is simply a new breed of camera, something completely new. A new way of taking pictures - where less depends on the photographer, at least in terms of the timing of the shot. It blurs the line between still images and video.
This camera system cannot be directly compared to any other conventional camera system. Its strengths lie in its speed and ability to capture moments even when used by a total novice. This system is simply a completely new concept and I believe Nikon will have to work hard to make it stick. If they succeed, the camera market will never be the same again!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2011 at 08:27 UTC as 16th comment | 2 replies

When reading the announcements of the J1 and V1 I was initially disappointed by the small sensor size. But then, like many others, I had anticipated a simple camera rivalling the Leica rangefinders in terms of IQ and sensor size. Instead we get an incredibly fast AF and high fps along with high-res video capabilities. This is simply a new breed of camera, something completely new. A new way of taking pictures - where less depends on the photographer, at least in terms of timing a shot.
This camera system cannot be directly compared to any other camera system (as far as I am aware). Its strengths lie in its speed and ability to capture moments even when used by a total novice.
My own photographic development has taken me to wanting a simpler camera with a larger sensor. This is not that camera. This system is simply a completely new concept and I believe Nikon will have to work hard to make it stick. If they succeed, the camera market will never be the same again!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2011 at 08:21 UTC as 93rd comment
Total: 8, showing: 1 – 8