Doug Bale

Doug Bale

Lives in Canada London ON, Canada
Works as a journalist
Joined on Jul 27, 2005

Comments

Total: 8, showing: 1 – 8

As this article's final paragraph says, phase-detection becomes less possible as light levels lessen. It also grows less practicable as cameras get smaller, with less distance between opposite sides of their smaller lenses. Fuji's technology is good news for cameras the size of a half-brick, less so for the subcompacts that are the main challenge to DSLR dominance.

But tiny lenses have their own advantage: they can be made in excellent quality at lower cost (as in smartphones). Why has no camera-maker yet returned to the twin-lens rangefinder paradigm, putting a small second lens 60-odd millimetres to one side of the main one and electronically superimposing part of the image from it onto the central area of that from the prime? — no more difficult to do than superimposing the control display over a Youtube video. Electronics monitoring the view covered by the prime could determine what portion of the secondary's image should be used in the superimposition. Let's hear it for Euclid!

Direct link | Posted on Jan 11, 2013 at 15:59 UTC as 2nd comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

buda1065: Can you filter out users that insist on uploading everything?

It would certainly make the site more congenial. It's not uncommon to see two dozen almost identical photos of the same thing, as if the photographers had set their cameras on 'continuous' and then just uploaded all the results before even looking at them. I wonder if they ever do get around to evaluating and winnowing the stuff.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 14, 2012 at 15:38 UTC
On A Serious Rangefinder Compact Camera article (137 comments in total)

While we're at it — this may be tempting a whole different discussion — I'd suggest that given today's technology the perfect device for focus control is no longer a dial around the lens, but a pressure-sensitive slider. A tap would turn it on, after which nudges forward or back would take you to wide angle or tele at a rate dependent on how hard you nudged it or for how long; steady pressure, as opposed to a light flick, would take you immediately to one extreme or the other.
To prevent focus being changed accidentally, the control would deactivate after a second or so, till the next tap. The interval between tap and deactivation would have to be programmable. And of course you'd want to be able to have the whole control deactivated in favour of auto-focus.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 22, 2012 at 15:04 UTC as 17th comment
On A Serious Rangefinder Compact Camera article (137 comments in total)

The model proposed is big for my taste. Perfection for me would combine the R100’s full-frame sensor with the S110’s size and focal reach and the LX7’s brightness at the long end. I should think that we're not far from seeing that synthesis. Besides these, the perfect camera would need controls constantly under the user's fingers for four essential factors: aperture, shutter, ASA and focus. One shouldn't need to take the camera away from one's eye to adjust any of those.
Also, my perfect camera's shutter would be wirelessly controllable. Of the three cameras cited above, only the S110 appears to have any sort of remote control capability, and it's not wireless. Instead of something the size of a salami and a tangle of wires, I want something like Apple's TV remote.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 22, 2012 at 14:47 UTC as 18th comment
On Canon Powershot S110 Preview preview (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

J D Tranquil: I would love to see a change in IQ rather than the added wi-fi capability. I just want the RX100 so badly.

I never thought the matte-surfaced S95 lacked grip-ability, and putting the front bar grip on the S100 seemed to me to spoil a beautifully clean design for the sake of solving a problem that didn't exist. But for people who needed it, at least it added nothing to the camera's size. The thumb grip, though, does — extending out unecessarily farther than the mode dial. I can't imagine that it will give a better grip. What /would/ do that would be two small roughened patches, back and front, for thumb and second finger, adding no protrusion at all.
For me, the significant improvement, which hardly anyone seems to have noticed, is that remote control is finally available.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 20, 2012 at 14:51 UTC
In reply to:

Doug Bale: The improvement I would most like to see in Flickr is a filter that would catch multiple postings of the same photo, or of photos that are virtually identical. One of the chief pleasures of the site is the ability to seeing what other people are shooting. It's a pleasure severely diminished by people who take forty-seven virtually indistinguishable shots of the same thing and post every last one of them. It would be nice if Flickr had an algorithm that could tell when anyone does that, and if those peopler could then be required to select no more than three or four of images to keep on the site. It's called editing.

No, what I'm proposing would let posters put up as many pictures as they chose, as long as the pictures aren't virtually identical — that is, if you fit one over the other there would be virtually no dissimilarities between them. Post sixteen pictures of your new baby if you must, but vary the angle, the distance, and wait till the kid changes expression.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 25, 2012 at 01:23 UTC

The improvement I would most like to see in Flickr is a filter that would catch multiple postings of the same photo, or of photos that are virtually identical. One of the chief pleasures of the site is the ability to seeing what other people are shooting. It's a pleasure severely diminished by people who take forty-seven virtually indistinguishable shots of the same thing and post every last one of them. It would be nice if Flickr had an algorithm that could tell when anyone does that, and if those peopler could then be required to select no more than three or four of images to keep on the site. It's called editing.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 20, 2012 at 15:34 UTC as 38th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: I still wish someone other than Sigma had taken on Foveon sensors. Tremendous potential but probably not with Sigma behind it. I still use the DP1 and it doesn't need any improvments in sharpness, detail or lens quality. But green corners, magenta blotches, etc are a real drag. And no, I did not get a bad one.

It remains to be seen how compact this 'compact' camera is. The smaller the better, for my money. But isn't the whole purpose of having a compact camera compromised by designing it for interchangeable lenses, rather than a fixed zoom? Having to tote one or two extra lenses lessens the pocketability factor, no?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 9, 2012 at 01:09 UTC
Total: 8, showing: 1 – 8