Picturenaut

Picturenaut

Lives in Frankfurt am Main
Works as a science journalist
Has a website at www.roland-wengenmayr.de
Joined on Jun 1, 2010
About me:

Love to shoot wildlife, birds, animals, macros of insects and spiders, plus street and portrait of people (I like to draw portraits too).

Comments

Total: 125, showing: 1 – 20
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On Canon EOS 7D Mark II First Impressions Review preview (1866 comments in total)
In reply to:

Philip Lanoue: Does this new 7D have in camera HDR?
Even though I have seen that stated, I can't find info on that in spec reviews either here or on Canon's site.

Canon introduced in-camera HDR with the 5D3 into their camera bodies, but having and using a 5D3 since 2012 I can tell you that I have given up using this tool after some trials. If I want HDR I do prefer postprocessing because I can control more parameters.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 13, 2014 at 07:35 UTC
In reply to:

blue hour: - no touchscreen
- no Wifi
- can't record 4K video
- more expensive than the competition (Pentax K3, Sony A77 Mk II,Olympus E-M1)
- all of those competitors feature stabilization built into the body, that works with every lens you attach
- rumours of a hybrid viewfinder (like the Fuji X100 T) didn't make it to the production line- Canon should reinforce their innovation management

@ Rishi: right, that's main flaw I also see in the concept of the otherwise quite intriguing 7D2. Canon sacrifized the tilt- and touchscreen for the heavy duty body of the 7D what seems to be logical. But it is not logical to built-in the new dual pixel AF system without touchscreen capability for video.

To make the package round Canon should deliver the 7D2 with a Wifi transmitter for free in a standard kit (Canon's WFT-E7A is embarassingly expensive) plus a smartphone clip for the camera body, so people can use their phones as additonal touchscreen for video.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 25, 2014 at 10:10 UTC
In reply to:

mais51: At 910 grams it is heavier than a D810 and ways above the D750 and only 40g lighter than the full frame 5D Mark III. What do they put in that body - more focusing sensors ?

@ autochrome: my 5D3 is still doing well, I expose it mostly to the same rough conditions than the 7D, but my 7D has double age.

For me, the lenses are most important, and I stick with Canon because of some great tele lenses plus its legendary king of bokeh, the 85/1.2. This is one of my most used lenses (besides a 500 mm supertele).

For wildlife shooters like me one problem is that Nikon's superteles are aged technology. You rarely get good reviews of superteles, but by luck we had some two years ago in German photozines when we wanted a new 500 mm for our Nikon gear. Both photozines came to the conclusion that the current Nikkor 500/4's resolution isn't up to the high res sensors in current Nikon DSLRs. In one of those reviews, Sigmas 500/4.5 (latest version) outperformed optically the Nikkor, so we decided to forget about VR (IS in Canon world), half a stop of aperture, pay half the price and get the better lens for our Nikon gear. Didn't regret that, the Sigma is great.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 25, 2014 at 09:41 UTC
In reply to:

mais51: At 910 grams it is heavier than a D810 and ways above the D750 and only 40g lighter than the full frame 5D Mark III. What do they put in that body - more focusing sensors ?

It is really heavy, but the original 7D was already a tank. My 7D survived a severe crash, heavy salt & sand storms, and still works flawlessly. The D300 of our Nikon gear with about the same age, same use, was falling literally into pieces and completely died past year (mirror mechanics broken at about 90.000 shutter actuations, repair cost would have overtopped the cameras value). With Canon you pay with additional weight but you get this top mechanical quality you would have expected from Nikon in the old days (our three vintage FM-2's are still in service).

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2014 at 07:56 UTC
In reply to:

KBarrett: I am a huge Sony fanboy, but I still can't let you get away with using the word "translucent" as badly as Sony does.

In particular because Canon invented this technology in the early 1960s...

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2014 at 07:43 UTC
In reply to:

Alpha Channel: The 7D Mk II appears to have been made for me. I love my 5D Mark III and will continue to use it as my primary body for portrait and landscape work. I don't expect that the 7d Mark II will be quite up to the IQ of the 5D Mk III, but if it lives up to Scott Kelby's claim, in his Canon feature, that it has the best high ISO performance he has ever seen on a crop sensor DSLR, it should be a great body for my sports and wildlife photography. I too am a bit disappointed that Canon chose not to put in Wifi, but what they did put in sounds outstanding (hopefully it will live up to the billing). Features I am most excited about:
1. Weight and form factor almost identical to the 5D Mk III. This weight and form factor makes for great control and excellent balance when used with pro lenses
2. Anti-flicker mode - I spend hours in post, correcting for the constantly varying color temp and brightness of the lights in many HS football stadiums
3. New AF system
4. Great value at that price

I have exactly the same thoughts about the 7D2 (I have a 5D3, too): it's an impressive package for sports & wildlife shooting. The only thing that makes me frown is its high ISO noise (I often need to go up to ISO 1600 for tele shooting). First RAW samples on the web really look like the 70D's results, and that's a progress from the old 7D, but not really a huge one. Canon obviously has a chronic noise problem with their electronics (it is not the sensors itself as many people believe).

Otherwise, the 7D is a killer with only one strange feature: dual pixel AF in LV without touchscreen will not allow manual AF selection without shaking the camera when you shoot freehand. I think Canon should add to the standard kit a Wifi dongle for remote control and a mount to clip a smartphone as touchscreen on the camera.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2014 at 07:40 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II First Impressions Review preview (1866 comments in total)
In reply to:

BalasmicVinegar: So checking various UK sites, the 7D MK II is to retail around £1600. The 6D which is full frame retails at £1300. So is the 6D going to be replaced by a 6D MK II? A 5D is 'only' £700 more than a 7D MK II.

Canon seem to have got their pricing a bit messed up.

the 7D II is made for real heavy duty outdoor use. My 7D survived severe crashes (wildlife shooting), and I am pretty sure that a swivel touch screen would have been broken. Canon made the 70D for touchy sviwellers...

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2014 at 11:56 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II First Impressions Review preview (1866 comments in total)
In reply to:

yzhenkai: in short, this is a aps-c 1DX.

exactly, and for a stunningly decent price in a smaller body...

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2014 at 11:45 UTC
On Photokina 2014: Canon stand report article (70 comments in total)
In reply to:

Anastigmat: If I am going to spend $1800 on an APS-C camera, I would definitely scrape together another $500 for a full frame. 10 frames per second is nice but I would take better image quality instead because 100% of my photos will benefit, whereas 10 frames per second is only needed once in a great while.

I use both FF (5D3) and APS (7D) body, and I appreciate that Canon offers such an attractive upgrade with crop sensor e.g. for sports or wildlife tele shooting. They fill in the gap they left open after going FF only with the 1 series. In particular I am excited about the 7DII's AF capability at "f/8" lenses, this will allow use of TC's with superteles for action.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2014 at 11:30 UTC

I use a lensbaby composer sometimes as a mind opener when I get stick with my usual ways of photography. Street shooting with it on FF is a crazy experience, in particular if you try to get moving people into the sharp "sweet" spot. The results can be everything between breathtakingly awful and stunningly beautiful. Using a lensbaby can be an effective cure for creative blocks caused by perfectionism...

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2014 at 07:47 UTC as 3rd comment
On Rare Canon EF 1200mm f/5.6L USM goes on sale in UK article (218 comments in total)

You'll also need an additional budget for paying some sherpas to carry this nice travel lens ;-).

Direct link | Posted on Aug 16, 2014 at 19:18 UTC as 25th comment
On Rare Canon EF 1200mm f/5.6L USM goes on sale in UK article (218 comments in total)
In reply to:

kodachromeguy: "Longest lens in the world?" Maybe the longest physical lens for 35mm format, but Nikon made a 2000mm lens years ago for manual focus Nikon F mount. The Leica R (or M) 800mm f/6.3 APO-Telyt-S may have been almost as long physically because the Leica was not a telephoto lens, it was a long focal length lens.

Canon made a 5200 mm prototype lens for FD mount:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRq18WpQZC0

Direct link | Posted on Aug 16, 2014 at 19:16 UTC
On Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lab Test Review preview (226 comments in total)
In reply to:

Picturenaut: For all birders and wildlife photographers: in Scandinavia, after shooting atlantic puffins, I had a brief talk with a guy using the Tammy with an EOS 7D. Overall he was quite happy with this lens and its IQ, in particular in terms of price-performance ratio. The only drawback is AF performance. He said that he had completely given up to try birds in flight with this lens. I have to add that even with a Canon supertele it is a real challenge to get a good BIF pic of those speedy little puffings (they fly with about 80 km/h), but it is not impossible.

So the AF performance of the Tammy is a limitation at least birders should be aware of. Otherwise this lens is so attractive that I personally still think about getting me a copy for those trips I can't take my 500 mm prime with me/ I want zoom flexibility.

Didn't check this but I guess that the old Tamron 200-500 might have much less lenses included than the new 150-600. I understand that the new construction is quite sophisticated. More optical glass means more weight (the new Tammy has a plastic housing).

Re the Sigma "wide aperture" 300-600 we can only say now: it's all rumors, nothing else...

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 19:12 UTC
On Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lab Test Review preview (226 comments in total)

Yesterday we had the chance to test this Tammy in a shop in Frankfurt (Germany) both with our Canon and Nikon gear and bought a copy with Nikon mount. AF performance with the Nikon (D300S) was quite good out of the box. With our Canons it was a mixed bag. AF performance of the test copy was overall okay with our 7D, but not with our 5D3.

Checking the test images I noticed that the lens was heavily backfocusing on the long end with the 5D3 and would have needed severe microadjustment. I remembered that Bryan Carnathan reported the same issue in his great review:
http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Tamron-150-600mm-f-5-6.3-Di-VC-USD-Lens.aspx

Overall I agree with Brian's findings after this brief test. The Tammy is no match for a good prime supertele on the long end, but delivers surprisingly decent IQ in the 200-500 mm range. One big plus over the Bigma: f = 5.6 already @ 400 mm available. If AF issues can be solved it is definitely a great travel zoom for wildlife shooters.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 3, 2014 at 10:15 UTC as 14th comment
On Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lab Test Review preview (226 comments in total)
In reply to:

Picturenaut: For all birders and wildlife photographers: in Scandinavia, after shooting atlantic puffins, I had a brief talk with a guy using the Tammy with an EOS 7D. Overall he was quite happy with this lens and its IQ, in particular in terms of price-performance ratio. The only drawback is AF performance. He said that he had completely given up to try birds in flight with this lens. I have to add that even with a Canon supertele it is a real challenge to get a good BIF pic of those speedy little puffings (they fly with about 80 km/h), but it is not impossible.

So the AF performance of the Tammy is a limitation at least birders should be aware of. Otherwise this lens is so attractive that I personally still think about getting me a copy for those trips I can't take my 500 mm prime with me/ I want zoom flexibility.

A Sigma 300-600mm with wider aperture would be quite a beast (depending on the aperture of course) and surely located in a different market in terms of size, weight and price, more like Canon's and Nikons 200-400/4. The "Sigmonster" 300-800/5.6 e.g. is a lens that you can't compare with the Tammy 150-600, it costs about 5 times the Tammy's price (in Europe). Past yr I had the occasion to test a Sigma 300-800. This is really a monster lens, heavy like a truck, you always need to carry a good tripod with it. I shoot my EF 500/4.5 quite often handheld, but with the Sigmonster - no chance.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 3, 2014 at 09:59 UTC
In reply to:

xlynx9: This is the most interesting news I've seen here in years.

yepp, IQ might need a decent improvement within the first generations, but surely this is very interesting.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 29, 2014 at 08:30 UTC
On Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lab Test Review preview (226 comments in total)
In reply to:

Picturenaut: For all birders and wildlife photographers: in Scandinavia, after shooting atlantic puffins, I had a brief talk with a guy using the Tammy with an EOS 7D. Overall he was quite happy with this lens and its IQ, in particular in terms of price-performance ratio. The only drawback is AF performance. He said that he had completely given up to try birds in flight with this lens. I have to add that even with a Canon supertele it is a real challenge to get a good BIF pic of those speedy little puffings (they fly with about 80 km/h), but it is not impossible.

So the AF performance of the Tammy is a limitation at least birders should be aware of. Otherwise this lens is so attractive that I personally still think about getting me a copy for those trips I can't take my 500 mm prime with me/ I want zoom flexibility.

That's good news as they might be able to improve a Tammy's AF performance step by step with this and future firmware updates. Tamron like Sigma and other 3rd party lens makers have the problem, that they have to re-engineer Canon's and Nikon's AF systems. Otherwise they would have to pay them a lot of money to use their native AF control parameters.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 28, 2014 at 08:09 UTC
On Mountain Magic: Shooting in the Lofoten Islands article (73 comments in total)

Good images, nicely captured atmosphere. I personally like the composition of most of them, Erez has good eye for structures.

I read the critics of some posters here with great interest. If bford & Co. think that they are more skilled landscape photographers, they really should come up with own examples. C'mon bford & Co., show some of your fantastic images! I think most of the readers here are happy to learn...

Direct link | Posted on Jul 28, 2014 at 08:04 UTC as 12th comment
On Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD Lab Test Review preview (226 comments in total)

For all birders and wildlife photographers: in Scandinavia, after shooting atlantic puffins, I had a brief talk with a guy using the Tammy with an EOS 7D. Overall he was quite happy with this lens and its IQ, in particular in terms of price-performance ratio. The only drawback is AF performance. He said that he had completely given up to try birds in flight with this lens. I have to add that even with a Canon supertele it is a real challenge to get a good BIF pic of those speedy little puffings (they fly with about 80 km/h), but it is not impossible.

So the AF performance of the Tammy is a limitation at least birders should be aware of. Otherwise this lens is so attractive that I personally still think about getting me a copy for those trips I can't take my 500 mm prime with me/ I want zoom flexibility.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2014 at 10:41 UTC as 20th comment | 6 replies
On Nikon D810 Preview preview (1544 comments in total)

DSC_8558 impressed me most: looks like the D810 is the sweetest pastry-shooting DSLR in the world. Good news for pastry shooters!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2014 at 10:14 UTC as 130th comment
Total: 125, showing: 1 – 20
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